Sunday, August 6, 2017

Mooney M20TN Acclaim Type S, N608MR, Premier Aircraft Sales Inc: Accident occurred April 20, 2015 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida

Similar Previous Accident
A review of the NTSB database revealed an accident involving a similar airplane and engine that occurred on May 10, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas (NTSB accident number CEN14LA234). In that case, the pilot also advanced the throttle lever while operating in the airport traffic pattern and the engine stopped producing power. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no anomalies, and the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 10, 2014 in San Antonio, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2014
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRPLANE CO INC M20TN, registration: N563JK
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he intended to practice takeoffs and landings, and he completed the first takeoff and landing without incident. While on the base leg of the landing pattern after the second takeoff, the pilot pushed the throttle forward, and the engine stopped producing power. He was unable to regain engine power, so he made a forced landing into a small clearing, which resulted in substantial damage and a serious injury. The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The fuel-injected engine was shipped to the manufacturer for further examination and an engine run, during which the engine demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination and testing of the engine revealed no anomalies.





The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Mooney International Corporation; Kerrville, Texas
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio
Orscheln Products; Moberly, Missouri

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Premier Aircraft Sales Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N608MR





NTSB Identification: ERA15FA191 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 20, 2015 in Lakeland, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: MOONEY M20TN, registration: N608MR
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot fueled the airplane with 20 gallons of fuel before departing on the 1-hour cross-country flight. While on final approach to the destination airport, the pilot advanced the throttle lever; however, the engine did not respond. The pilot attempted to restore engine power but was unsuccessful and subsequently conducted a forced landing to a small clearing. The airplane impacted terrain, trees, and a gate before coming to rest about 1 mile short of the runway and was largely consumed by postcrash fire.

Based on the minimal rotational damage to the propeller and propeller assembly, it is likely that the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power before impact. Due to the significant postcrash fire it was unlikely that the loss of engine power was the result of fuel exhaustion.

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine, including the fuel and ignition systems, revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or abnormalities that would have precluded normal operation. Although functional testing of the engine-driven fuel pump and the throttle body was precluded due to thermal damage, disassembly of the units revealed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined due to thermal damage and because postaccident examination of the engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 20, 2015, about 1440 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20TN, N608MR, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power on approach to Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was owned by Premier Aircraft Sales, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and an instrument rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Stuart Airport (SUA), Stuart, Florida about 1340, with the intended destination of LAL.

In a written statement, the pilot stated that the airplane was on final approach with the landing gear and flaps extended, and that the engine's manifold pressure was indicating about 12 inches. As he advanced the throttle, the engine did not respond. The pilot attempted to troubleshoot the problem to restore engine power but was unsuccessful and subsequently conducted a forced landing to a clearing. The airplane impacted terrain, trees, and a gate about 6,000 ft from the runway 27 threshold at LAL; the forward fuselage, including the cockpit area, was consumed by a postcrash fire.

A fuel receipt indicated that, on the morning of the accident, the airplane was fueled with 20 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel before departure from SUA.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate issued August 25, 2003, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane; and a private pilot certificate with a rating for glider. He held a third-class FAA medical certificate, which was issued in May 2013, with the restriction, "must have available glasses for near vision." His most recent flight review was conducted in May 2014. According to the pilot's logbook, he had 5,735.4 total hours of flight experience, of which 32.7 hours were in the 90 days preceding the accident, and 12.4 hours were in the 30 days preceding the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane, serial number 31-0132, was issued an airworthiness certificate on March 2, 2015. It was powered by a Continental Motors TSIO-550-G5B, 310 hp reciprocating engine, serial number 1010446, which drove a Hartzell PHC-J3YF-1RF three-blade-model F7498 propeller. The airplane was new and had not yet received a 100-hour or annual inspection; however, it had undergone a new airplane inspection as required by the manufacturer.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1433 recorded weather observation at LAL included wind from 280° at 8 knots, visibility 5 miles, thunderstorms and light rain, scattered clouds at 1,600 ft above ground level (agl), overcast clouds at 2,600 ft agl, temperature 22°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.88 inches of mercury.

The 1450 recorded weather observation at LAL included wind from 360° at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, thunderstorms and light rain, scattered clouds at 1,600 ft agl, overcast clouds at 3,300 ft agl, temperature 22°C, dew point 21°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.89 inches of mercury.




WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was moved before the investigative team's arrival; however, photographs revealed that the airplane was engulfed in flames shortly after impact. A video taken by the pilot immediately after he exited the airplane showed fire beginning predominantly forward of the wings but engulfing the wings within a few seconds of the start of the recording.

The initial impact point was indicated by three tire markings in the grass, corresponding to each of the airplane's three landing gear, which extended about 20 ft. The tire marks ended, and the airplane subsequently impacted a palm tree about 5 ft agl, then a 15-ft-tall archway over an entrance gate before impacting another tree and the ground. The debris path extended about 200 ft on a heading about 060° from the initial impact point, and the airplane came to rest on a heading about 260°.

The forward fuselage exhibited extensive thermal damage. The empennage was intact and not affected by the postcrash fire. The engine remained attached to its mounts and the firewall; however, all of the mounts displayed varying degrees of impact damage.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange and the propeller spinner was secured to the hub. The spinner exhibited no rotational scoring or signature marks around its circumference. The three propeller blades remained attached to the hub. One blade exhibited leading edge gouging, one blade tip was bent aft, and the other blade exhibited chordwise scratching and was bent aft about midspan.

Engine Observations

Examination of the engine revealed extensive thermal damage to the rear accessory pad and top of the engine. The turbo controller was not observed and was presumed to be destroyed by the postimpact fire. The No. 5 cylinder exhibited impact damage on the cooling fins. All spark plug leads remained attached to their respective plugs and to their respective magnetos. The fuel injector lines remained attached. Portions of the lubrication line system were thermally destroyed. No external anomalies were noted.

The crankshaft was rotated by hand at the propeller flange, and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders except No. 5 as a result of impact damage that restricted movement of the valves. Crankshaft continuity was observed from the propeller flange aft to the crankshaft gear bolts and the accessory end. Camshaft continuity was also confirmed. Removal of the oil pump housing cap revealed that the oil pump gears were intact with no signs of hard particle passage throughout the housing. The oil filter was in place and safety-tied. The oil filter was removed and cut open for examination. The filter element was thermally damaged but otherwise unremarkable.

The engine oil dipstick was present; the oil level was about 7 quarts, within the normal operating range, and the oil appeared normal in color and was free of contaminants. The propeller governor remained attached to the front side of the engine, and the cable remained secured and attached to the propeller lever.

Ignition System

The ignition wiring was thermally destroyed. The magnetos were secure on their mounting pads. The pressurization lines to the magnetos were secured in place but were destroyed by fire. The ignition harness was destroyed; however, the terminal leads to the sparkplugs were secured and in place. All spark plugs were secured and in place. The top spark plugs were removed and the cylinders were inspected with a borescope. All cylinders appeared normal in color and no abnormalities were noted within the cylinder barrels, intake valves, or exhaust valves. The sparkplugs appeared to be in new condition with little-to-no combustion deposits on the electrodes or insulators. During crankshaft rotation, the magneto impulse couplings were audibly observed. Removal of the vent plug on each magneto revealed the distributor gears were intact and the left magneto showed signs of thermal distress. The magnetos were removed for further testing. The shafts and gear rotated freely by hand. Removal of the ignition harness from the distributor towers did not show any signs of arcing or cracking.

Turbocharger System

The left and right turbochargers were manufactured by Hartzell. The slope control was not located during the examination and was presumed to have been destroyed by postcrash fire. The manifold pressure, upperdeck, and oil lines remained in the area of the slope controller. The wastegate actuator lines were secured to their respective locations. The wastegate actuator operated as intended with no anomalies noted when compressed air was applied. No foreign object debris-related damage was noted on either turbocharger's impeller, and the impellers could be rotated by hand. The oil lines to and from both turbocharger bearings were intact and secured to their respective fittings.

Engine Fuel System

The supply line to the fuel pump was attached and secured to the inlet. The inlet, outlet, and vapor return lines were attached and finger-tight, with numerous threads engaged. The upper-deck reference was also secured to the fuel pump. The mixture control remained attached to the mixture lever and the lever remained secured to the mixture shaft, at the full-rich position, as found. The engine-driven fuel pump remained attached and secure and the drive coupling was intact. The housing bolts were intact and safety-wired; however, there was considerable thermal distortion of the housing.

The throttle body was intact and attached to the intake plenum, and the throttle control cable was attached to the throttle lever, which was attached to the throttle shaft. There were no signs of binding. The manifold pressure lines and upper-deck pressure lines remained secured to the throttle body. The inlet fuel line and the fuel line from the fuel metering unit to the manifold valve were secured.

The fuel manifold valve was in place and sustained thermal damage; all fuel injector lines remained attached to the fuel manifold valve. The fuel injection lines remained secured to their respective fuel injection nozzles. The upperdeck reference lines were in place around the fuel injection nozzles. All fuel injection nozzles were free of debris.

The fuel selector valve was found in the left tank position and the fuel gascolator stem was down. The selector valve was removed and air was blown through the engine line; the valve operated normally through all settings. The fuel supply lines remained attached to the firewall. The fitting on the inlet and outlet lines to the boost pumps remained secured and in place. The electrical wiring was thermally destroyed. The engine controls were located, and the throttle and mixture levers were in the full forward position. The gascolator was removed and exhibited extensive thermal damage. The unit was disassembled and the screen was unobstructed.

Right Wing

The right wing exhibited impact crush damage and thermal damage outboard of the landing gear well. The flap was impact separated and segmented into two pieces, and the thermal damage extended from the root outboard to 70 inches from the wing tip. The aileron remained attached at its attach points. The pushrod that connected the aileron bellcrank to the aileron was not located; however, the fracture ends displayed soot damage on the fracture surface. The fuel cap was not located. The fuel system vent tube remained in the wing and the area around the vent tube was thermally damaged. Compressed air was applied to the vent tube and air was noted exiting the vent tube system into the fuel tank. The fuel tank was compromised and destroyed by postcrash fire. The landing gear remained attached, was observed in the extended position, and was thermally damaged.

Left Wing

The left wing was separated into three sections. The outboard section began at the inboard hinge of the aileron and extended to the wing tip. The segment was devoid of thermal damage, was impact-damaged, and the aileron remained attached. The middle section was cut during recovery and exhibited minimal thermal damage, mostly on the inboard portion of the section. The middle section also contained the fuel cap, which was found secure and in place, and the fuel vent, which was bent approximately 15° about 5 inches from one end. The vent tube was removed from the fuel tank fitting. Air was applied to one end of the tube; however, air flow through the tube was restricted. A light was attached to one end and light was visible from the other end of the tube. No debris was observed exiting the tube when air was applied. The inboard section of the wing was about 5 ft in length, was thermally damaged, and remained attached to the fuselage; however, it was cut to facilitate transport. The fuel tank was destroyed by postcrash fire. The main landing gear was detached at the top of the gear strut and, according to recovery personnel, was located along the debris path. The landing gear did not exhibit any thermal damage. The flap was separated into two sections and appeared to have been cut for transport. The speed brake remained attached and was found in the retracted position.

Cockpit

The cockpit exhibited extensive thermal damage. The flight control column was destroyed; however, elevator continuity was observed from the area near the control column to the elevator. Aileron continuity was observed from the area near the control column to the fracture points along the segmented sections of the aileron tube. The cockpit and seats exhibited extensive thermal damage. The front seats were equipped with AMSafe inflatable seatbelts; however, the pilot did not recall the seat belts inflating. The bruising on the pilot's torso was consistent with an uninflated shoulder harness. The squibs for the AMSafe system seatbelt and shoulder harness were located and were thermally damaged. The buckles were not located for the front seats. The seats were co-located with their attach points; however, the seats were not securely attached due to thermal damage.

Empennage

The empennage aft of the cargo compartment was intact and exhibited no thermal damage. Measurement of the flap barrel indicated that the wing flaps were in the fully extended position. The elevator trim measured 1.75 inches, which correlated to a slightly nose-up trim setting. The right and left horizontal stabilizers remained attached at their respective attach points. The right horizontal exhibited minor crushing at the leading edge root. The left horizontal stabilizer counterweight was not located. Rudder continuity was confirmed from the rudder to the rudder pedals and to the nosewheel steering.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Throttle and Mixture Cable

The as found positions of the throttle and mixture cable were noted at the accident site. The cables and their respective assemblies were then sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for further examination. Both control assemblies exhibited significant heat damage; however, no pre-existing binding or obstruction to operation was observed on either of the controls. The throttle cable position was measured at 3.75 inches, which correlated to 74% open. According the airplane manufacturer, the full-closed (idle) position would measure 1.3 inches, and the full (open)-throttle position would measure 4.620 inches. The mixture cable position measured 6.70 inches, about 57% rich. According to the manufacturer, the full idle-cutoff position would measure 5.35 inches, and the full-rich mixture position would measure 7.70 inches. The throttle control cable could not be easily moved, likely due to heat damage to the liner. The mixture control release rod was bent and unable to be moved, likely due to thermal damage.

Magnetos and Fuel System Component Examination

The ignition and fuel system components were examined at the manufacturer's facility under NTSB oversight. The magnetos could not be functionally tested due to thermal damage. Rotation of the drive shafts resulted in a coinciding rotation of the distributor gears (as observed through their respective housing ports). Disassembly of the magnetos revealed that the internal timing of each magneto was correct. The internal wires sustained thermal damage and some components were corroded. The cam follower opened and closed the points appropriately during drive shaft rotation.

The engine-driven fuel pump sustained thermal damage that precluded functional testing. The pump was disassembled and no pre-accident anomalies were noted with the internal components. The mixture control shaft o-ring was in place, but was thermally damaged.

The throttle body was disassembled and no pre-accident anomalies were noted with the internal components. The o-rings were in place.

The fuel manifold valve was disassembled and the diaphragm was intact with the plunger secured. The screen was clear with no debris or obstructions noted.

A test was conducted with an exemplar engine-driven fuel pump on an exemplar engine. The mixture control shaft o-ring was omitted to induce a known leak from the engine-driven pump. During priming operation, fuel was observed leaking from the mixture control shaft. The exemplar engine was started and run throughout production test parameters (idle to full power) with no misses or engine stumbling noted.

Throttle Body

The throttle body could not be functionally tested due to thermal damage; however, the manufacturer provided a new, exemplar throttle body for testing purposes. The valve's o-rings were removed to simulate a leak in the throttle body assembly. The assembly was then connected and bench-tested on a fuel test stand and subsequently attached to an exemplar engine and tested under the supervision of NTSB personnel. The throttle body operated within the acceptable range of a new unit and no anomalies or hesitations were noted.

Similar Previous Accident

A review of the NTSB database revealed an accident involving a similar airplane and engine that occurred on May 10, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas (NTSB accident number CEN14LA234). In that case, the pilot also advanced the throttle lever while operating in the airport traffic pattern and the engine stopped producing power. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no anomalies, and the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.





























NTSB Identification: ERA15FA191 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 20, 2015 in Lakeland, FL
Aircraft: MOONEY INTERNATIONAL CORP M20TN, registration: N608MR
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
On April 20, 2015, about 1440 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20TN, N608MR, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power while on final approach to Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument rules flight plan was filed. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight had departed from the Stuart Airport (SUA), Stuart, Florida, about 1340.

The airplane was removed prior to the investigative team's arrival; however, photographs provided to the investigative team revealed that the airplane came to rest near the aft end of a boat, that was on a trailer. The airplane forward of the aft baggage compartment bulkhead, was engulfed in flames. A video, taken by the pilot immediately after exiting the airplane, revealed fire beginning predominately forward of the wings but engulfing the wings within a few seconds of the start of the recording. The accident flight path was oriented on a 060 degree heading and the debris path began with three tire marks, approximately 20 feet in length and 200 feet to the west of the main wreckage resting point. The airplane became airborne, impacted a palm tree about 5 feet agl, as evidenced by an imbedded pitot tube in the tree trunk, impacted an archway over an entrance gate that was about 15 feet in height, struck another palm tree, and then impacted the ground coming to rest on an approximate heading of 260 degrees. The accident location was about 6,100 feet and 76 degrees from the runway 27 threshold, the intended landing runway.

According to the pilot, he had been vectored around some weather and was at 2000 feet above mean sea level (msl). He was given clearance to descend to 1600 feet msl and was placed on the final approach course at the final approach fix for the RNAV runway 27 approach. In order to configure for landing he reduced the power, extended the landing gear, and extended the flaps to the 33 degree flap setting. Once he was established at his planned approach speed, he utilized the veneer knob, on the throttle, to add power; however, the engine failed to respond. He then utilized the throttle lever and applied full power; however, the engine did not respond. He switched fuel tanks, checked his magneto switch, and fuel pump in an attempt to get the engine to respond; however, none were successful. Due to his configuration he elected to make an off airport landing and turned the airplane to the right, towards a vacant field. He further stated that the time from the first attempt to apply power and the accident was less than a minute.

Postrecovery examination revealed that the airplane was thermally damaged forward of the baggage compartment aft bulkhead. Impact damage was consistent with the airplane impacting the ground in a right wing, nose down attitude. The left wing was segmented into three sections and the right wing was segmented into two sections about midspan. Examination of the propeller blades revealed that the engine was not under power at the time of the impact and that the propeller was most likely windmilling. Examination of the fuel vents revealed that there was no obstruction to the fuel venting system. Examination of the engine revealed crankshaft and camshaft continuity from the propeller flange to the rear accessory pad, and thumb compression was noted on all cylinders, except for Cylinder No. 5 which had sustained impact damage.

A fuel receipt located at a fixed base operator at SUA revealed that, on the morning of the accident, the airplane was fueled with 20 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel. According to the pilot, the 20 gallons was a "top off" and would have provided him with full fuel tanks. The engine was retained for further examination.

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