Thursday, August 10, 2017

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N5274Q, KCSI Texas Inc: Accident occurred August 09, 2017 in Wellston, Jackson County, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA311 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 09, 2017 in Wellston, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N5274Q
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2017, about 1220 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S airplane, N5274Q, experienced a loss of engine power while maneuvering at low altitude near Wellston, Ohio. The pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by KCSI Texas, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company visual flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Newark-Heath Airport (VTA), Newark, Ohio, about 1330, and was destined for James A. Rhodes Airport (I43), Jackson, Ohio.

The pilot and observer were conducting an aerial observation flight of a pipeline. While maneuvering toward I43 to refuel, the pilot heard a "significant boom" and noticed a reduction in engine rpm. The pilot unsuccessfully attempted to regain rpm and then initiated a forced landing to a green space between trees. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted rolling, uneven grass terrain, and a barbed wire fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. 

Examination of the engine by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector noted a large hole on the top of the engine crankcase. The airplane was recovered for further examination.

On August 24, 2017, the engine was examined at a recovery facility by a Lycoming Engine representative under the supervision of a FAA inspector. Examination and disassembly of the engine revealed a large hole at the top of the crankcase inboard of the No. 4 cylinder. According to Lycoming Engines, the No. 4 connecting rod failed at the small end bushing. The other 3 connecting rod small end bushings were found displaced forward from their normal positions, and the No. 3 connecting rod small end bushing was free to move by hand. 

A review of the aircraft maintenance records revealed the engine was field overhauled on September 2, 2016, at a total time of 2,664.5 hours. During the overhaul, Lycoming LW-13923 connecting rod upper bushings were installed (according to an invoice from Lycoming Engines, the bushings were shipped from the factory on June 30, 2016). The most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on June 15, 2017, at 503.5 hours since major overhaul (SMOH). On July 20, 2017, at 556.4 hours SMOH, the engine oil was changed with no anomalies noted in the oil filter or oil suction screen. The July 2017 oil change record was the last record in the engine logbook.

On August 4, 2017, Lycoming Engines issued mandatory service bulletin (MSB) No. 632B, Identification of Connecting Rods with Non-Conforming Small End Bushings. According to the MSB, LW-13923 connecting rod bushings, shipped between November 18, 2015, and November 15, 2016, may be suspected as not meeting Lycoming Engine specifications and require follow-up corrective action. The MSB stated the following warning, "You must complete the 'required action' in this service bulletin to ensure that your connecting rod bushings are properly seated. If a connecting rod bushing becomes unseated, the connecting rod can fail, causing an uncommanded and complete loss of power." The MSB time of compliance was within the next 10 hours of engine operation.

The FAA issued an airworthiness directive (AD) 2017-16-11, effective August 15, 2017, which required the inspection of connecting rods and replacement of affected connecting rod small end bushings. The AD required accomplishing the instructions in Lycoming Engines MSB No. 623B.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
  
KCSI Texas Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5274Q


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA311
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 09, 2017 in Wellston, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N5274Q
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2017, about 1220 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S airplane, N5274Q, experienced a loss of engine power while maneuvering at low altitude near Wellston, Ohio. The pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerial observation flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight departed a Newark-Heath Airport (VTA), Newark, Ohio, at an unknown time, and was destined for James A. Rhodes Airport (I43), Jackson, Ohio.

According to the FAA inspector who responded to the accident site, the pilot and observer were conducting an aerial observation flight of a pipeline. While maneuvering, the engine lost power, and the pilot initiated a forced landing to an open green space between trees. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted rolling, grass terrain, and a barbed wire fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. After removing the top engine cowling, the inspector noted a large hole on the top of the engine crankcase. The airplane was recovered for further examination.






A late Wednesday morning plane crash on Loop Road, right off State Route 327 near Wellston, had emergency responders from several agencies on scene.

The plane crash was first reported at approximately 11:47 a.m. on August 9.

The plane had two occupants, the pilot and a passenger who sustained injuries, but only the pilot was transported by helicopter to Cabell-Huntington Hospital in West Virginia for evaluation.

Reportedly, the pilot was complaining of back pain so there were some concerns about a possible spinal injury. The passenger was alert and moving around at the scene but was transported to Holzer Medical Center-Jackson via Jackson County EMS to be evaluated.

The registered owner of the plane is KCSI Texas, Inc.

Jackson County Emergency Management Agency Director Robert Czechlewski said the two men were based out of Kentucky and were flying the gas pipeline when the crash occurred.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol (OSP) identified the pilot as 26-year-old Stephen Dawson of Louisville and the passenger was 26-year-old Joshua Simone of Louisville.

According to the OSP report, Dawson stated he was doing an aerial gas pipeline inspection when he lost power to the engine. The plane struck an incline on the west side of Loop Road then jumped across the road striking a wire fence before coming to rest on its landing gear.

The plane sustained damage to its wing, landing gear and nose.

In early afternoon, Czechlewski reported that his office had contacted the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Cincinnati and that they should arrive at the scene at any time. He indicated the OSP was containing the crash site until the FAA arrived to begin their own investigation as to the cause of the crash.

Jackson County EMS, the Wellston and Coalton Fire Departments, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, the Ohio State Highway Patrol, and Jackson County Emergency Management Agency were all on scene at the crash site.

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