Sunday, April 16, 2017

Flight Design CTSW, N466CT: Accident occurred April 06, 2016 near Hilton Head Airport (KHXD), Beaufort County, South Carolina

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA148
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 06, 2016 in Hilton Head Island, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/25/2017
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN CTSW, registration: N466CT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot reported that, as he was approaching the landing runway, he retarded the throttle and descended from 1,300 to 1,000 ft mean sea level. He added that, a few seconds after retarding the throttle, the engine "ran rough" for a few seconds and then lost all power and would not restart. He did not attempt to apply carburetor heat, configured the airplane for best glide speed, and maneuvered for a forced landing on a golf course. After landing, the left wing struck a tree. 

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation, and there was sufficient fuel onboard at the time of the accident. A test run of the engine revealed no anomalies. Given that the weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to serious carburetor icing at glide power and the pilot chose not to apply carburetor heat after the engine initially lost power, it is likely that the engine lost power due to carburetor icing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to apply carburetor heat following a loss of engine power due to carburetor icing.

    


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Columbia, South Carolina 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N466CT

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA148
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 06, 2016 in Hilton Head Island, SC
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN CTSW, registration: N466CT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 6, 2016, about 1530 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design Gmbh CTSW, N466CT, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. The sport pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Cape Fear Regional Jetport (SUT), Oak Island, North Carolina about 1400, and was destined for Hilton Head Airport (HXD).

The pilot reported that he was approaching HXD from the west, and reported to tower personnel that he was 8 miles out. He made a midfield call, retarded the throttle to 4,200 rpm, and descended from 1,300 feet above mean sea level (msl) to 1,000 feet msl. A few seconds after reducing the throttle, the engine "ran rough" for a few seconds, then shut down and would not restart. The pilot did not attempt to apply carburetor heat. He set up for best glide speed and maneuvered for a forced landing on a golf course. After landing, the left wing struck a tree and the airplane came to a stop.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The airplane struck a tree and came to rest upright. He observed structural damage to the composite leading edge of the left wing. The fuel system contained about 4.5 gallons of fuel. The fuel appeared to be free of contaminants and water. The air filter was clean and compression was observed on all cylinders.

Following the examination of the engine and fuel system, the owner leveled the airplane and started the engine with the FAA inspector providing oversight. The engine started, produced power, and no discrepancies were noted.

According to the 1550 weather observation at HXD, located about 2 miles southeast of the accident site, the temperature and dew point were 64 degrees F and 54 degrees F, respectively. According to the carburetor icing probability chart in FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 (Carburetor Icing Prevention), dated June 30, 2009, the temperature/dew point at the time of the accident was in the area of serious icing at glide power.











NTSB Identification: ERA16LA148
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 06, 2016 in Hilton Head Island, SC
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN CTSW, registration: N466CT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 6, 2016, about 1611 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design Gmbh CTSW, N466CT, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power and forced landing at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. The sport pilot and one passenger were not injured. The light sport airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight from Oak Island to Hilton Head Airport (HXD) originated about 1400.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the aircraft was about 9 miles north of HXD and the pilot was instructed to report midfield downwind. The pilot subsequently reported that his engine was "out" and performed a forced landing on a golf course, about 2 miles north-northwest of HXD.

An inspector with the FAA responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The airplane struck trees and came to rest upright. Structural damage to the composite wings was evident. The wing fuel tanks contained fuel. A cursory visual examination of the engine revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure. 

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

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