Saturday, April 8, 2017

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N3280M: Fatal accident occurred April 08, 2017 at Orlando Sanford International Airport (KSFB), Orange County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Thomas Camman: http://registry.faa.gov/N3280M

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA148 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in Sanford, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 12, registration: N3280M
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 8, 2017, about 1256 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-12, N3280M, was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire after takeoff from Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to review of preliminary air traffic control communications, the pilot received a takeoff clearance for runway 27L to remain in the airport traffic pattern, which he acknowledged. There were no further communications with the pilot.

A witness to the accident recorded the flight on his cellular telephone. He provided the video, and gave a statement to airport police, which was consistent with the content of the video. According to the witness, the "airplane accelerated normally for takeoff, pitched up, and continued to pitch up into a full stall, rolled to the right and nosed in on right side of 27L." He stated a postimpact fire ensued and was extinguished by aircraft rescue and firefighting personnel.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane single and multiengine land ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on February 7, 2017, with the limitation, "must wear corrective lenses. " The pilot reported 25,000 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The three-seat, high-wing, tail-wheeled, fabric-covered airplane was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235-C1C engine, rated at 115 horsepower, that was equipped with a Sensenich two-bladed, fixed pitch propeller.

The accident flight was the first flight following a 2-year restoration of the airplane that included replacement of the wing and fuselage fabric, flight control cables, and electrical wiring.

The airplane came to rest inverted, oriented on magnetic heading of about 170°, in the grass about 9 ft north of runway 27L, adjacent to the 1,000 ft markers. 

The nose of the airplane was crushed aft.

The propeller was attached to the engine, which was located adjacent to a linear ground crater.

The empennage, fuselage, cockpit, and wings were consumed by postimpact fire.

The engine exhibited significant thermal damage, and several of its accessories were separated. 

The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand and continuity of the valve train was established from the crankshaft flange to the rear gears. Thumb compression was obtained on all four cylinders.

All flight control surfaces (ailerons, flaps, rudder, elevators, and trimmable horizontal stabilizer) were attached to their respective attach points. 

The left and right aileron cables were continuous from the control stick to their respective bell cranks. 

The rudder cables were continuous from the foot pedals to the rudder bell crank.

The elevator control cables were found attached to the upper and lower ends of the elevator control horn in the tail of the airplane.

Elevator control cable continuity was established from the control horn to the forward and rear control sticks.

Manipulation of the elevator control cables revealed that a nose-up control stick input resulted in a nose-down deflection of the elevator and vice versa. 

Further examination revealed that the elevator control cables were improperly rigged, such that they were attached to the incorrect (opposite) locations on the upper and lower elevator control horn.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



This picture was taken before the fatal accident.



SANFORD, Fla. - One person died Saturday in a plane crash at the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, officials said.

The incident involved a Piper P12 that crashed into the grass and burst into flames at the airport shortly before 1 p.m., said Lauren Rowe, with the Orlando-Sanford International Airport.

The pilot has been identified as Thomas Camman, 55, a long-time tenant at the Southeast Ramp of the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, officials announced late Saturday.

Diane Crews, president with the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, said the Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser was on its maiden voyage following its recent restoration. Crews said it appears the plane stalled, then crashed shortly after takeoff.

“This is a sad day for the Orlando Sanford International Airport. We grieve with the family and friends of Mr. Camman. 

We would also like to express our appreciation for the first responders today, including our Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Department, the Sanford Airport Police and the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office," said Crews.

Two runways will be closed until Monday for the investigation, but Rowe said it’s not impacting flights arriving or departing the airport. The runways impacted are for private and corporate planes, Rowe said.

"Planes been taking off, back and forth," said David Summerlin, who was at the airport. "(I) didn't hear nothing inside. (I have) been working all day, then we see a bunch of police and ambulance going that way. (I) didn't hear nothing."

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

No one else was injured, investigators said.


Story and video:   http://www.wftv.com




SANFORD -  Seminole County fire officials said they were investigating an incident involving a plane that came down at the Sanford International Airport and left the pilot dead Saturday afternoon.

The air traffic control tower at the airport issued an alert at 12:52 p.m. that a crash had happened in the grass on the north side of Runway 9R, airport officials said. A Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser crashed to the ground shortly after takeoff.

Airport officials said the pilot was killed upon impact. The pilot was identified by the airport as Thomas Camman, 55, a long-time tenant at the Southeast Ramp of the airport.

"This is a sad day for the Orlando Sanford International Airport, we grieve with the family and friends of Mr. Camman," Diane Crews, president and CEO of Orlando Sanford International Airport, said in a statement. "We would also like to express our appreciation for the first responders today, including our Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Department, the Sanford Airport Police and the Seminole County Sheriff's Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a statement on the incident earlier in the day.

"A Piper PA-12 aircraft veered off the runway and burst into flames as it was departing Orlando Sanford International Aircraft at about 1 p.m. today. Check with local authorities on the condition of the pilot, the only person on board. The FAA will investigate," the FAA wrote.

Airport officials said there were no other injuries to anyone on the ground, no damage to the airfield and no interruption in the airport's commercial flight operation.

Runways 18-36 and 9L are expected to remain closed until Monday following the conclusion of the investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, airport officials said.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.floridatoday.com

SANFORD, Fla. - Seminole County fire officials said they were investigating an accident involving a plane that came down at the Sanford International Airport and left one person dead Saturday afternoon.

Fire officials said a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser crash-landed on the runway and caught fire.

One person was killed in the accident, Seminole fire officials said.

A portion of the runway was closed following the accident, but did not affect operation on the main runway, airport officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a statement on the incident.

"A Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser aircraft veered off the runway and burst into flames as it was departing Orlando Sanford International Aircraft at about 1 pm today. Check with local authorities on the condition of the pilot, the only person on board. The FAA will investigate," the FAA wrote.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.clickorlando.com



SANFORD, Fla. —   A pilot was killed when a small plane went off the runway Saturday afternoon at the Orlando Sanford International Airport.

The incident occurred around 1 p.m., when a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser was taking off.

The FAA said the plane veered off of the runway and burst into flames. The pilot was the only one aboard, according to the FAA.

Airport President Diane Crews told WESH 2 News that runway 9R, the southernmost runway that runs east-west, is closed.

She said aircraft takeoffs and departures are continuing as normal, because this runway is not the airport's main runway.

She said there does not appear to be any damage to the airport. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wesh.com

The pilot of a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser aircraft is dead after a fiery crash at the Orlando-Sanford International Airport Saturday afternoon, authorities said.

Lauren Rowe, director of communications at the airport, said the incident happened between 1 and 2 p.m. The plane was taking off when it veered off the runway and burst into flames in a grassy area, she said.

There were no passengers on board, and no one else was injured, Rowe said.

The crash occurred on a runway used by private aircraft, so airport operations were not affected, she said.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the incident. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is yet another terrible tragedy for the ALPA brothers and sisters and all pilots pilots alike. Just about a week ago we lost one active and one retired UA pilots in the mid-air. RIP!

Curt Sullivant said...

Tom was a great guy and very experience pilot. Everyone that knew Tom enjoyed his company. I don't think I ever heard him speak poorly about anyone. He will be missed greatly.
Blue skies as you head west brother.

Anonymous said...

Tom Camman a pilot's pilot.

Bill Mahoney said...

Preliminary NTSB report indicates elevator cables were rigged backwards.