Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Cessna T210K Turbo Centurion, N9402M Aviation LLC, N272EF: Fatal accident occurred January 02, 2017 in Payson, Gila County, Arizona (and) Accident occurred July 03, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration; Scottsdale, AZ
Textron Aviation; Wichita, KS
Continental Motors Group; Mobile, AL

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N9402M Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N272EF 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  SCOTTSDALE

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA045
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 02, 2017 in Payson, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA T210K, registration: N272EF
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 2, 2017, about 0937 Mountain standard time, a Cessna T210K, N272EF, was destroyed after it collided with mountainous terrain near Payson, Arizona. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed Scottsdale Airport (SDL), Scottsdale, Arizona at 0912 and was destined for Telluride, Colorado. 

According to the pilot's friend, he planned a flight to Colorado with his family for their annual vacation. Preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar data showed an airplane that had departed SDL with a VFR transponder code on a direct course for the pilot's destination airport. After approximately 12 minutes of flight, the airplane reached a final cruising altitude of about 7,950 feet mean sea level. The airplane subsequently descended about 1,300 feet in one minute before it entered a momentary climb, followed by a shallow descent. In the remaining two and a half minutes, the airplane maintained a 300 foot per minute descent rate with some intermittent climbs. The final two radar targets showed the airplane ascend about 425 feet in 12 seconds. The airplane maintained a straight track from SDL to the last radar target, which was within a tenth of a nautical mile of the accident site and indicated a field elevation of 6,670 feet.

The last radar target was recorded at 0937:39. Between 0938 and 0942, an ATC facility received reports from three separate aircraft that had received ELT signals near the accident site. 

The airplane came to rest on the south face of a mountain rim approximately 11 nautical miles north of Payson Airport at an elevation of about 6,601 feet. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by an aluminum fragment embedded in a 50 foot tall tree about mid-span and several broken tree branches beyond the IIP. An initial ground scar was marked by airplane fragments, tree branches, and loose dirt approximately 40 feet forward of the IIP. Portions of the wings and elevators were found along the wreckage path. The main wreckage was found approximately 80 feet from the IIP and was comprised of the engine, fuselage, and tail section, which had been displaced approximately 30 degrees upward from the ground. The vertical stabilizer and rudder had separated from the fuselage and were hanging by the airplane's rudder cables. An odor of fuel was detected near each wing fuel tank, which were both separated and breached.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




Family and friends are mourning the death of a Valley family who died Monday when their plane crashed into the base of the Mogollon Rim north of Payson.

Attorney Eric Falbe, 44, was flying his Cessna 210 with his wife Carrie, 31, and his 12- and 14-year-old daughters from Scottsdale to Telluride for what appears to be a skiing trip.

Radar information showed that the plane ascended in Scottsdale and then descended quickly in the Payson area and crashed into the face of the Rim near where the phone was pinged above Washington Park, according to a story in the Arizona Republic.

Family members called authorities at around 9:30 p.m. on Monday when the family never arrived in Colorado.

Around 10 p.m., the Scottsdale Police Department contacted the Gila County Sheriff’s Office about a possible plane down in the area.

At 2:30 a.m., Jon Barber, a pilot with the Civil Air Patrol, was called on to help the Department of Public Safety Ranger helicopter locate the plane.

Barber, who learned to fly in Rim Country, said he is very familiar with the area and had flown to locate several other plane wrecks, including one in 2012 when a plane crashed into the Rim near Strawberry, killing three men on board. That same year, a 28-year-old Mesa man died south of Payson when his plane crashed into the Mazatzal Mountains during a storm.

Barber said when they went up early Tuesday morning, it was mostly clear with a patch of clouds on the Rim.

Since it is difficult to spot a downed plane at night, they normally wait for daylight to search, Barber said. But because they were receiving a signal from the plane, rescuers wanted to search for possible survivors.

With two others on board, Barber went up and used onboard equipment to pinpoint the signal from the plane. Circling the area at 9,000 feet, Barber told the DPS helicopter crew hundreds of feet above the ground where to direct their spotlights. DPS spotted the plane between 4:30 and 5 a.m.

On the moonless night Barber couldn’t see the plane on the ground until the DPS crew shone its spotlights on the wreckage.

Barber said earlier in the day rescuers had noted clouds hanging over the Rim, making it impossible to see the edge of the Rim.

The Federal Aviation Admini­stration has launched an investigation to determine the cause of the crash.

On Tuesday, half a dozen Tonto Rim Search and Rescue volunteers went up with the GCSO to collect the bodies.

TRSAR Commander Bill Pitterle said they found the wreckage some 800 feet below the Rim, about an hour’s hike through the snow and mud from the nearest road.

Pitterle said it was a difficult recovery. “We brought them home and that is what we do,” he said. “We brought them home.”

Carrie had posted photos of the family at Telluride last year on a ski trip on her Facebook page.

The sheriff’s office, FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.


Source:   http://www.paysonroundup.com







SCOTTSDALE, AZ - Court documents show that the two teenage sisters killed in a small plane crash this week should not have been on the flight in the first place. 

Victoria and Skyler Falbe were flying to Telluride, Colorado, with their stepmother and dad, Eric Falbe. Falbe was at the controls of a Cessna 210 as it departed from Scottsdale around 9:30 Monday morning. The plane later slammed into the Mogollon Rim around 7,000 feet just north of Payson, killing all four people.

Divorce records show the girls’ biological mother tried to keep them out of the plane altogether. 

In the childcare agreement section of the divorce, there was a requirement that if Victoria and Skyler flew on a private plane, the pilot had to have a commercial license and file a flight plan. 

According to the FAA, Falbe did not file a flight plan for the trip to Telluride. Pilot registration records on the FAA website also show Falbe is only certified as a private pilot — one level below commercial. 

What’s not clear is whether the mother signed off on the flight, despite the written agreement. 

Victoria, 14, and Skyler, 12, both went to Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale. 

“They were just really happy girls,” said Jake Thomas, the Cicero athletic director. 

“Victoria just had a servant's heart. She just wanted to help,” Thomas said. “Skyler was a little competitive. She was passionate. She expected the best of herself.”

Thomas said the sisters were both heavily involved in the school community and were both on the volleyball and softball teams. The school and its students are determined to keep their memory alive and considering options for doing just that in the upcoming semester.

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com
 





Skylar and Victoria Falbe



SCOTTSDALE, AZ  -   Smart and talented is how the Cicero Preparatory Academy athletic director remembers the two girls who lost their lives when their father's plane went down near Payson this week.

"They were always smiling, that's what I was thinking about the other day," said Cicero Prep Athletic Director Jake Thomas. "Whenever I say Tori it was just always smiles."

Victoria Falbe was 14 and in the eighth grade. Her 12-year-old sister, Skylar, was in sixth grade.

"And Skylar was the more competitive fire. She always wanted the best out of her and her teammates," Thomas said.  

Both girls played together on the school's softball team, currently halfway through its season.

"They loved sports a lot," Thomas said. "They were both very active and very interested in being scholar athletes."

They were preparing for the playoffs next month.

Still enjoying their winter break, the girls were going with their father, Eric Falbe, and his wife, Carrie, on their annual ski trip to Colorado on Monday. But their small private plane never made it. It was found crashed just north of Payson.

All four lives were lost.

Thomas knows their loss will change the rest of the school year.

"I spoke with the coach today and I'm hoping that the softball team can kind of come together and continue the season in honor of them, and we've thought of some ideas to memorialize them a little as we play the rest of the season," Thomas said.

The school is still working out the details, but it hopes to hold a vigil for the girls sometime Thursday evening.

Story and video:  http://www.azfamily.com


PAYSON, AZ - The Gila County Sheriff's Office says a family of four has been found dead after a plane crash near Payson.

According to officials, a small plane headed from Scottsdale to Telluride, Colo. was reported overdue by Scottsdale Police before 10 p.m. on Monday. 

Crews went to the area where a cell phone last pinged, an area north of Payson called Washington Park. The crash site was located with aerial help from the Air Force Civil Air Patrol and Arizona Department of Public Safety.

The Scottsdale Police Department said a 44-year-old man and his 31-year-old wife were found dead, along with the man's 12-year-old and 14-year-old daughters from a previous marriage. Nobody else was believed to be on board.

Friends confirmed Eric Falbe, his wife Carrie, and daughters Victoria, 14, and Skylar, 12, were killed in the crash.

The brother of the girls' biological mother, Cynthia Larmore, released a statement on her behalf Tuesday evening, saying, "Cynthia Larmore is extremely devastated by the loss of her two beautiful daughters, Victoria and Skylar. Both were loved dearly and will be remembered forever."

The two teens were students at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, ABC15 has learned. 

The school released a statement Tuesday, saying: 

Our sincerest condolences go out to the Falbe family for their tragic loss, and to our grieving Cicero Prep students and teachers. Great Hearts will make grief counselors available for both employees and students when school resumes on Monday.

Attorney Michael Maledon, who worked with Falbe at a Scottsdale law firm, told ABC15, "Eric and Carrie will be remembered for their passion for life and warmth toward others."

A family member told police that the four were on a yearly trip they always take around the holidays to Colorado.

ABC15 learned the girl's biological mother became anxious when the girls, who are very active on social media with her, stopped responding. She then contacted Scottsdale police after getting a gut feeling that something was wrong. 

Sources tell ABC15 the girl's mother did not want her children in the plane as she didn't think her ex had enough flight experience; the woman did take the man to court over the issue in fear that something like a crash would happen. 

A family friend told ABC15 the man had recently picked up flying within the last few years. 

The FAA says the Cessna 210 crashed under unknown circumstances.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating.

Story and video:   http://www.abc15.com




PAYSON, Ariz. - Crews searching the wreckage of a small plane crash north of Payson Tuesday morning discovered four bodies inside. 


The Cessna 210 was reported overdue on its flight from Scottsdale to Telluride, Colorado.


A Scottsdale police report said the plane carried a woman, man and two teenage girls, 12 and 14 years old.


Scottsdale lawyer Michael Maledon confirmed Tuesday afternoon that his law partner Eric Falbe and Falbe's family were the four people killed in a small plane crash near Payson Tuesday morning.


Falbe was 44 and his wife, Carrie, was 31 years old.


The Great Hearts Academies, a charter school network which includes the daughters' school, released the following statement:


"Our sincerest condolences go out to the Falbe family for their tragic loss, and to our grieving Cicero Prep students and teachers. Great Hearts will make grief counselors available for both employees and students when school resumes on Monday."


Falbe's children -- who were from an earlier marriage -- were students at Cicero Preparatory Academy.


According to the police report, it was a trip the family made every year and Scottsdale police were called to the Scottsdale Airport where a man was looking for his son-in-law, daughter and two grandchildren. 


Their private plane had not arrive at their destination. 


The man told police it was not unlikely for them to decide to drive at the last minute, but a photo sent through Snapchat from one of the girl's cellphones to her mother confirmed to police they decided to fly.


According to the police report, information later obtained by the investigators showed the plane ascended from Scottsdale and quickly descended off the radar near Payson.


Pings on the family cellphones placed them approximately 14 miles east of Strawberry, Arizona where a DPS ranger located a possible crash site.


Three bodies were initially found during a search of the wreckage.


The Gila County Sheriff's Office located the fourth body later in the day.


The investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing.


Story and video:  http://www.12news.com






Victoria, Eric, Carrie and Skylar Falbe


Two adults and two girls killed when their small plane bound for Telluride, Colorado, crashed on Monday near Payson have been identified as a Scottsdale-based attorney and his family, multiple sources say.

The Cessna 210 crashed with four people on board: a 31-year-old woman; her 44-year-old husband; and the husband's 12- and 14-year-old daughters from a previous marriage, according to a Scottsdale police report.

The Gila County Sheriff's Office verified that the plane's tail number matched FAA records identifying the owner as Eric Falbe of Scottsdale. Falbe's law partner, Michael Maledon, confirmed that Falbe was aboard the downed plane, as was wife Carrie Falbe and his two daughters.

"For those that worked with Eric, he will be remembered as a truly exceptional businessman and lawyer," Maledon said in an email. "He was the best kind of lawyer; highly capable and exceptionally practical. But beyond Eric’s professional accomplishments, Eric and Carrie will be remembered for their passion for life and warmth toward others. We mourn their loss and extend our deepest sympathies to their families."

Maledon said an investigator reached out to him Tuesday morning for information about the downed plane.

"I knew his tail number and I knew where he was heading, and I knew it must have been Eric," he said.

Maledon said he had taken several trips with Falbe in his plane, including several flights to Mexico last year. Falbe was a good pilot, Maledon said, adding that his friend "was always very safe and cautious every time I flew with him."

"The community lost a really exceptional family," Maledon said.

Falbe's daughters attended Cicero Preparatory Academy, a member of the Great Hearts Academies charter-school network, according to a statement that Great Hearts posted online Tuesday afternoon.

"Our sincerest condolences go out to the Falbe family for their tragic loss," the statement said. "Grief counselors will be available when school returns Monday."

The Gila County Sheriff's Office received a call about 9:48 p.m. Monday from the Scottsdale Police Department saying a plane flying from Scottsdale to Telluride was reported overdue and never made it to Colorado, according to Sarah White, chief administrative officer for the Sheriff's Office.

Carrie Falbe's father, who called Scottsdale police at about 9:30 p.m., said he was deeply concerned because the family had taken the trip in years past and always texted or called him when they got in safe, the police report said. He said he texted and called all the family members and heard nothing, police reported.

Carrie's father said he was unsure whether they flew the plane or took a car. But the daughters' mother later confirmed they took the plane, saying that she received a Snapchat from one of her daughters when they were taking off, according to the police report.

Police reached out to a variety of airports and learned that the plane had not landed at those places, the police report said.

Deputies, with help from the Arizona Department of Public Safety's Ranger helicopter and the Air Force Civil Air Patrol, pinged a cellphone and located the plane northwest of Washington Park, an area about 14 miles north of Payson, White said.

A helicopter search began about 2 a.m., and the plane was found about 4:50 a.m. in an area with dense trees and hills, police reported. Initially, three members of the family were found dead, and deputies later located the fourth body, White said.


The plane crashed under unknown circumstances, according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman.


A review of radar information later showed that the plane ascended in Scottsdale and then descended quickly in the Payson area near where the phone was pinged, police reported.


Gregor said it didn't appear that Falbe had submitted a flight plan to the FAA before taking off Monday.


The crash is being investigated by the Sheriff's Office, the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.


Story and video:  http://www.azcentral.com

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: WPR13LA319
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 03, 2013 in Phoenix, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/11/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA T210K, registration: N272EF
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, when he put the landing gear handle down, the left main landing gear did not indicate that it was locked. He cycled the landing gear several times in an attempt to get it down and locked before landing. During the landing, the left main landing gear collapsed, and the left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were substantially damaged. Disassembly of the left main landing gear actuator revealed that a gear tooth from the piston assembly had broken off, which prevented the left main landing gear from locking in the down position. The reason for the gear tooth failure could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The collapse of the left main landing gear due to a broken gear tooth in the landing gear actuator.

On July 3, 2013, about 2000 mountain standard time, a Cessna T210K, N272EF, sustained substantial damage when the left main landing gear collapsed while on landing roll at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, Phoenix, Arizona. The private pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal cross-country flight, which had originated at 1825 from Falcon Field Airport, Mesa, Arizona. A flight plan had not been filed.

The pilot reported that he had put the landing gear down, but the left main landing gear down-and-locked light did not indicate that it was safely locked. After several attempts to get the left main landing gear safely down and locked, the pilot landed the airplane, and the left main landing gear collapsed. The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were bent and wrinkled.

In the presence of a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, on August 22, 2013, the left main landing gear actuator assembly was disassembled. A broken gear tooth from the end to the piston assembly was found. This tooth was responsible for the final "down lock" of the left main gear. The assembly operated properly in the "up and locked" position, which the pilot verified occurred with each cycling of the landing gear. The failed tooth was not made available for further examination and the failure mode was not determined.

41 comments:

Anonymous said...

The mother of the children had concerns about her daughters flying with the ex-husband, does anyone know what type of rating he had or how much flight experience he had accumulated?

Thoughts and prayers for the families

Anonymous said...

One aviation database indicates the pilot held a Private Pilot - Airplane Single Engine Land. Who knows how much actual experience he had in that model of aircraft and in that type of terrain. Very, very sad!

Anonymous said...

I knew Carrie personally. Eric, her husband and the pilot, had a lot of experience flying that plane. He flew them to Mexico for their wedding, along with many other places.

This is such a tragic accident. Those who personally knew the Falbe family are so very saddened by this loss. -JF

Anonymous said...

My thoughts and prayers to the mother of these beautiful girls and also to the families of Eric and Carrie Falbe.
May they all RIP...

Anonymous said...

Devestated to hear this news yesterday. I don't know them really, but have met them while camping a night at Payson Airport just this past September. My boyfriend and I had flown in as well, on our way to Texas. I remember it was Skylar's birthday weekend, and she loved camping. The four of them were beautiful together. Full of life, love, and laughter.

Thoughts and prayers for their family.

Anonymous said...

"I knew Carrie personally. Eric, her husband and the pilot, had a lot of experience flying that plane. He flew them to Mexico for their wedding, along with many other places."

That's what literally everyone who knew the pilot says about him when he crashes. Ten bucks says the reality is otherwise.

Anonymous said...

My condolences to all who knew this family, and especially to the young children's mother. I cannot imagine what her pain must be like. I am embarking on earning my private pilot's license and if there is one thing I am schooling myself on is the number 1 reason private pilots lose their lives on: flying into MVFR/IMC weather when you are not IFR trained. Based on what a previous person posted on 01/02/2017, the weather in the Payson area at the time of the accident was not ideal VFR conditions. My gut feeling is that the pilot of this aircraft was not IFR trained, although I do not know this for sure.

Having "a lot of flying experience" does not mean you are capable of flying an aircraft into MVFR/IMC/IFR conditions unless you have considerable training in those conditions. In addition, the pilot did not file a flight plan for this flight, even though the distance between SDL and TEX was 480 nm. The FAA recommends that if your destination airport is >50 nm, you should always file a flight plan.

Bottom line is that this was a highly preventable crash that cost the lives of 4 people.

Anonymous said...

It's hard to say at this point whether or not it was "highly preventable". It could have been a mechanical issue. We don't know enough yet. Also, filing a flight plan doesn't help much. It's the *flight planning* that needs to happen not necessarily the filing of a flight plan. This is a common laughing point among pilots because the press often cites the lack of a flight plan as if this would have somehow magically saved the day. Proper flight planning includes much more information than goes into the filed flight plan which is essentially just routing with estimated times and altitude.

I've been a pilot and aircraft owner for over 20 years.

Anonymous said...

Ice?

Anonymous said...

"That's what literally everyone who knew the pilot says about him when he crashes. Ten bucks says the reality is otherwise."

$10 is yours

This pilot had owned the plane only since 2011, and was new to flying at that time. Since then, it had to make at least two emergency landings (first in La Paz, Mexico in 2012 because of engine failure then again in 2013 locally, because of a faulty landing gear. Primary instruments were largely non-functional on this plane and alternates were jimmy-rigged.

This was the worst nightmare of the sisters' biological mother, who fought valliantly to keep them off this death trap. She had no confidence in the mechanical integrity of the aircraft or the capability of the pilot, and her intuition was correct. Unfortunately, because of Eric Falbe being an attorney, and specializing in making her life as miserable as possible, she was unsuccessful. She knew this tragedy would eventually happen, and could do nothing about it!

No doubt his two daughters and new wife had been convinced that flying with him was safe and as a pilot he would boast how he could handle any situation that might arise. Twice before flyiing solo he cheated death, sadly this time around he did not and he took the innocent lives of two beautiful young girls and his lovely young wife with him... three people who didn't know or couldn't understand the risks. My heart breaks for them and the lives unnecessarily lost.

Anonymous said...

Greetings to: I've been a pilot and aircraft owner for over 20 years.

This accident is and was "highly preventable". Yes, it could have been a mechanical issue. Actually, filing a flight plan DOES help - in the fact that search and rescue is guaranteed. That is really the only thing it does though - a very misunderstood fact. I agree, flight planning is extremely important. A skill that almost no one ever performs after their checkride - very depressing!

BTW- if you desire to operate small GA airplanes in high terrain, you are flirting with disaster (e.g. the Nevada Triangle; Sparky Imeson - Mountain Flying author). It is like being in the ocean on a surfboard. You could be putting yourself in a situation where you are 100% helpless. The aircraft just doesn’t have enough performance.

ATP, CFI, Air Carrier - Pilot for over 40 years. CFI for over 20 years.

Anonymous said...

Greetings to: ATP, CFI, Air Carrier - Pilot for over 40 years. CFI for over 20 years.

Thank you for validating my comments on Friday, January 6, 2017 at 6:45:00 PM EST. I am just embarking on my GA flying career and truly appreciate your professional insights to this tragic event. I have loved aviation since I was a young boy, listening to my dad tell me about his time spent in WWII as a B-17 ball turret gunner from April through June 1944. 25 missions in the ball turret and he survived, thanks to the P-51 Mustang escorting his bomber from England to France & Germany and back to England.

I suppose the one thing I have learned from my readings over the past several months is that flying into MVFR or IFR weather conditions, and only being trained as a VFR pilot, is almost certain death (been studying spatial disorientation and it is scary how many GA pilots kill themselves and the ones they fly with when this phenomenon occurs). As I previously stated, I have no idea what aviation competency this pilot possessed (whether he was IFR trained or not), and whether if the cause of the crash was mechanical or pilot error. But it sounds eerily similar to many of the NTSB accident reports I have read about pilots who fly into MVFR or IFR conditions and not having any or very little IFR skills.

Just out of curiosity: you wouldn't happen to live in Chandler, AZ, area? I am looking for a CFI who would be willing to train me in flying a Cessna 152 or 172.

Anonymous said...

**From: Thank you for validating my comments on Friday, January 6, 2017 at 6:45:00 PM EST.

And one other comment: my wife and I just got back from Payson, AZ, and we had a great meal at a local sports bar. I asked the bartender if he was in town on Monday, 02 January 2017 (the date of this fatal accident) and if he remembered what the weather conditions were like.

He stated that the weather was "low clouds and raining in the afternoon".

Sure doesn't sound like ideal VFR conditions....

AIRCRAFT IMPACTED MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN.

Date: 02-JAN-17
Time: 16:36:00Z
Regis#: N272EF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: PAYSON
State: ARIZONA

Anonymous said...

I didnt notice any fire marks from the photos

Anonymous said...

To: Anonymous: "I didn't notice any fire marks from the photos"

Are you saying fuel exhaustion? My God, I hope not.

This guy took off from SDL and KPAN is only 47.14 nm from SDL.

I suppose we can speculate what possible causes of this crash are till the cows come home, however, I will let the NTSB do their job.

Still, it's an awful tragedy that cost 4 people their lives.

Anonymous said...

So sorry, I live much further west in central CA.

Your desire to fly the 152 is a very good choice if your stature is small. I have trained many primary students in that aircraft. If your stature is larger, then the 172 is your choice. It has to do with weight as it relates to performance; until you fly solo.

Good luck!

The ATP, CFI, Air Carrier - Pilot for over 40 years. CFI for over 20 years.

Anonymous said...

This says it all right here folks:

1/2/2017 meteorological conditions at Payson, AZ was "Visibility 7.3 miles Fog and Rain.”

Date of Issue: 7/1/2010
Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT
Ratings: PRIVATE PILOT- AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND

Though this man had a good amount of flight time, nothing prepares you to enter fog / clouds / rain more than an Instrument rating. This man killed his family for something that he could have taken care of long ago. And if it was maintenance related, shame on him for not going the extra mile to ensure this aircraft with a spotty MX history was not checked over by multiple people.

Anonymous said...

How is this "Primary instruments were largely non-functional on this plane and alternates were jimmy-rigged" (from a post above) known?

Anonymous said...

Can someone advise me how to find a pilot on the FAA website?

Thanks....

Anonymous said...

On January 2, 2017, about 0937 Mountain standard time, a Cessna T210K, N272EF, was
destroyed after it collided with mountainous terrain near Payson, Arizona. The private pilot
and three passengers were fatally injured. The personal flight was operated under the
provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological
conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed
Scottsdale Airport (SDL), Scottsdale, Arizona at 0912 and was destined for Telluride, Colorado.

I wasn't sure if IMC/IFR conditions were present at the time of the crash, however, the above paragraph was taken from the NTSB Preliminary Report dated 01/02/2017, Accident Number: WPR17FA045, and the NTSB concluded that IMC conditions were indeed present.

Again, another tragic entry into the accident database regarding a VFR pilot entering IMC conditions and paying the ultimate price for a bad decision and resulting in 3 additional lost lives.

Anonymous said...

Respectfully, I would never;

1) Fly over any mountain area in that type of plane, (too small, no power).

2) Even think of trying to land that type of plane in a mountain valley like Telluride.

3) IMHO you need a plane with massive power to take-off from a mountain valley airport like Telluride, there is a long list of crashes from underpowered planes trying to take-off from mountain airports like Telluride. Flying in, let alone trying to fly out of Telluride with a plane like this is crazy.

Anonymous said...

T210 has more than enough performance for travel in and out of telluride, they fly in and out daily.

Anonymous said...

Anyone with flight experience have a sense on what might have happened to cause this tragedy, based on the altitude/radar information revealed in the preliminary NTSB report? Specifically was the likely culprit catastrophic mechanical failure and/or pilot error ?

To me it seems that engine failure or other catastrophic power loss might have occurred, based on the unexplained descents when approaching an area of rugged mountainous terrain. Perhaps the pilot ultimately got power restored at the very end - with the resulting final rapid ascent in an attempt to clear the escarpment of the Mogollon Rim - alas either too late or resulting in an accelerated stall.

The report mentions both wing tanks being breached with fuel odor, so fuel starvation can presumably be eliminated. This seemed exceedingly unlikely being so close to SLD but I did wonder given the absence of fire damage. I assume there was no spark to ignite the fuel.

I also wonder if anyone might have survived the impact, but succumbed subsequently to their injuries or even exposure... nearly a full day elapsed between the actual crash and arrival of a rescue team. How much sooner might help have arrived if a proper flight plan had been filed, or if the EFT signals picked up by other aircraft were investigated ? To me it seems that pilot negligence - if not in-flight error - might have played a role; clearly he violated the agreement terms with the former wife.

Anonymous said...

my main comment is: the "final cruising altitude" of 7,950' seems less than the 8,000' the Mogollon Rim is shown. Even the search unit was operating at 9,000' am I missing a basic concept in aircraft travel? higher than what one is flying over. I know this crash has other circumstances (mechanical/pilot) but having a cruising altitude of less than the terrain seems vital. Do private planes have a "black box"? we may never know for sure the actual reason for the erratic altitude loss.

Anonymous said...

Missed his last back door when he flew right past Payson Airport, 11 nm south of accident site.

Anonymous said...

It never ceases to amaze me why some always prefer to believe that a mechanical issue occurred with a fatal flight even when there is more compelling evidence of poor flight planning and basically error in judgement or pilot overconfidence. It almost feels like these people are in denial. On the one hand we have known unfavorable weather. On the other hand one could speculate about mechanical failure. More than 99% of these GA accidents tend to resolve at the end of the investigation as weather related contributing factor and not mechanical failure. I am sorry to say but I am getting sick to the stomach reading about pilots who kill their families because of overconfidence in their aviation skills. I am recently certificated pilot and even though I have taken different members of my family flying, I have hesitated to take the whole family yet because I feel my kids are not old and mature enough to sit through a flight and not be a distraction. And I would only fly in weather in which the safety of the flight was never in question barring a mechanical failure.
My condolences to the surviving relatives of the family especially the mother of those two innocent teenage girls.

Anonymous said...

Quote from the NTSB:

"After approximately 12 minutes of flight, the airplane reached a final cruising altitude of about 7,950 feet mean sea level. The airplane subsequently descended about 1,300 feet in one minute before it entered a momentary climb, followed by a shallow descent. In the remaining two and a half minutes, the airplane maintained a 300 foot per minute descent rate with some intermittent climbs. The final two radar targets showed the airplane ascend about 425 feet in 12 seconds. The airplane maintained a straight track from SDL to the last radar target, which was within a tenth of a nautical mile of the accident site and indicated a field elevation of 6,670 feet."

The above is a perfect description of "scud running"...trying to fly under the clouds and stay VFR in IMC. The course is "straight" so perhaps the plane was on autopilot or the pilot flew it that way (and the normal "loss of control by continued VFR into IMC") does not appear likely. That said...scud running is Stupid/risky/foolhardy for a VFR pilot or someone who is instrument rated but too lazy or unwilling to file a flight plan....suicidal in mountainous terrain. Whether this pilot had an instrument rating or not...this accident was 100% preventable. If he did have an instrument rating and did not call for a pop up clearance in flight, he killed his family by not doing so. If he was not instrument rated and undertook this flight and did not immediately turn around or declare and emergency when he got into trouble, he killed his family by not doing so. The NTSB will issue a report, but whatever that report ends up saying, the facts revealed so far sound very much like a stupid and/or arrogant/overconfident pilot who very tragically undertook a flight that ended his life and those of his family.

Anonymous said...

The pilot was not instrument rated. As far as not filing a flight plan, some pilots who don't want to be followed on flight aware will not file a flight plan (which is poor judgement). Since the mother of the girls killed didn't want them flying, I hope this wasn't the reason for not filing a flight plan on a cross county flight into mountainous terraine

Anonymous said...

The pilot was not instrument rated. Some pilots (the foolish ones) don't file flight plans because they don't want their ex wires to track them on flight aware. The mother of the girls who were killed didn't want them flying with their father in that plane.

Anonymous said...

Strange / Odd -- he filed other flight plans, but not the fatal flight. Not filing a flight plan aligns with secretly flying the daughters when the pilot (lawyer) was instructed by the courts not to have them as his passengers.

FlightAware will block the ability to track any aircraft after a verified request from the plane's owner; and you will get this message -- "this aircraft not available for public tracking per request from owner/operator". But that wasn't the case with this aircraft.

Common Sense said...

Common Sense ~ something, unfortunately the pilot sorely lacked.

Anonymous said...

The noninstrument-rated pilot’s continued visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of airplane control.

Anonymous said...

Straight path from SDL to crash site
Passed PJB without landing or requesting in-flight pop-up clearance
No evidence of mechanical failure

What we have here is an overconfident and under-experienced VFR pilot with no IFR training or flight plan, encountering IMC over mountainous terrain. Considering how quickly into the flight IMC were encountered, flight planning was negligent as well. Usually this happens near the destination, when there is more time for unexpected weather to develop.

Rim area of Arizona is amongst the most dangerous and foolish places for scud-running, which is the obvious cause of this accident. From the NTSB report he descended rapidly after reaching 8000 ft in an attempt to stay below the weather then would attempt to climb but lose visibility, forcing him to keep descending. Given the highly constraining terrain, ranging up to 5500 ft, he probably was flying at the cloud base where visibility would be impaired, another error. The crash site was into a 2,000 scarp, reaching 7500 ft, which he probably only saw immediately before flying into it - the rapid climb in the last seconds of the flight was too little, too late.

Year after year, continued VFR flight into adverse weather ranks among the most common causes of GA crashes. And they are usually fatal, just as in this case.

Anonymous said...

As I read through all these posts, it becomes painfully apparent this pilot flew into weather conditions he was not trained for. Next month I start my ground school training and shortly thereafter, commence my private pilot training. I've read countless NTSB reports on GA accidents and as the person mentioned on January 17, 2017, "year after year, continued VFR flight into adverse weather ranks among the most common causes of GA crashes. And they are usually fatal, just as in this case."

I am fortunate to live in Chandler, AZ, where the flying weather is some of the best weather in the country, year round. Having said that, my non-negotiable boundaries will be to always fly safe as my #1 priority:

1) No scud running
2) Always file a flight plan
3) If there is even a slight chance my destination airport will be in IMC conditions, the trip will be cancelled
4) Have Plan B, C, D, etc., in place to deal with any emergency that may arise
5) NEVER underestimate the power of Mother Nature

In closing, I am truly heartbroken for the mother who lost her two precious daughters as a result of their father's poor flying judgement.

Anonymous said...

**Need to clarify my 2nd non-negotiable boundary:

2) Always file a flight plan **when the distance to my destination airport is >50 nm from my home airport

Unknown said...

DON'T SCUD RUN!

Anonymous said...

I am an commercial airline pilot and get upset every time I hear of flights that end up in the mountains. Like Dirty Harry said...ya have ya know your limitations.
Most SEL airplanes cannot handle high altitude flight in mountainous terrain unless there turbocharged and pressurized.
It's sounds like the pilot made grave errors in judgement when he left VFR on that cold cloudy day. He probably would of been fine if he waited for better weather conditions a day later. If the weather is bad....just say NO...we can wait it out.
I fly a jet most of the time and we can pop right thru the worst of weather conditions....only because we have the right equipment.
When I fly the C-172....I would never dream of flying this plane in mountainous terrain or even IFR.
Remember alway be safe....and wait for better weather conditions before you takeoff.

Anonymous said...

I agree- DON'T SCUD RUN! Period!!

Also, please let us reexamine – ALL SEL airplanes cannot handle high altitude flight in mountainous terrain even though they are turbocharged. Turbocharging ONLY maintains a constant MP at altitude. The wings and propeller(s) are not turbocharged thus act the same as a non-turbocharged aircraft. Turbocharging is a very misunderstood concept and leads some to believe that the turbocharged airplane has much better capabilities and performance than it actually does. “A man has got to know his – and his aircrafts limitations”. SMALL AIRPLANES IN THE MOUNTAINS ARE A DISASTER WAITING TO HAPPEN e.g. Sparky Imeson! Very poor judgment! I am so so sorry for the Mother’s loss.

Pilots who die in bad weather are usually buried in the sunshine!

ATP, CFI, Airline, 39 years of safe operational experience


Anonymous said...

I am an FAA AGI and ex-squadron commander for Civil Air Patrol and a trained Mission Observer. I am very sad that this sort of thing has to happen. I can't even begin to imagine the pain that the mother of those two girls is feeling. It may diminish a little, but it will never go away.
.
It is for this reason that all pilots (from student to ATP) obey the cardinal rule: "Flying like the sailing, is inherently safe; however, it is TERRIBLY UNFORGIVING (WITH ABSOLUTE ZERO TOLERANCE) OF ANY MISTAKES, CARELESSNESS OR NEGLECT.
.
It has been said that “SOME PILOTS DEVELOP A “SIXTH SENSE” FOR SPOTTING THINGS THAT CAN GO WRONG AND EITHER AVOID OR FIX THE PROBLEM BEFORE IT HAPPENS. This is true, as a pilot you must develop this sixth sense, or you will eventually get hurt or killed.
.
Also remember, FLYING IS A RICH MAN’S SPORT (OR HOBBY). If you lack THE APPROPRIATE funds, stay out of this hobby. This means PLENTY OF MONEY funds for: CONSTANT TRAINING ! REGARDLESS IF YOU HAVE 100 HOURS OR 10,000 HOURS !! A GOOD PILOT NEVER STOPS GOING TO SCHOOL. NEVER !! IF YOU OWN A PLANE, THE FUNDS TO PROPERLY MAINTAIN IT IN LIKE NEW CONDITION !! THIS MEANS REPLACING PARTS (TIMED OUT PARTS) EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE STILL FUNCTIONING OK, AND PREFORMING MAINTENANCE RELIGIOUSLY LIKE IT WAS A SACRED RITUAL !! HAVING PERSONAL MINIMUMS FOR FLIGHT AND MAINTENANCE THAT ARE DOUBLE OR TRIPLE WHAT THE FAA OR THE AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER SAYS !! Remember, safety is never an accident…it must be carefully planned. A risk assessment must be taken before each flight using stringent personal minimums that far exceed ESTABLISHED minimums.

Anonymous said...

This turbo charged plane loves to fly in the high teens and low flight levels. It has plenty of power and range to fly to any location in the US. Most are equipped with six place oxygen. This looks like a pilot who was scud running (trying to remain flying visual in full cloud cover conditions)! You just keep dropping lower until you hit something like a mountain, tower, building and ground.

Anonymous said...

I wasn't familiar with Sparky Imeson, but based on some of his comments, or at least quotes attributed to him, I decided to look him up. Saying single engine planes shouldn't be flying over mountains is way too broad of a generalization. I was especially amused, all due respect, by the ATP above saying he would never ever fly a Cessna 172 over mountains or in instrument conditions. Both are done both safely and routinely on a daily basis. By knowing both the pilot's and the airplane's limitations.

So I found some articles on Sparky. Turns out he died in early 2009 trying to photograph the site he had crashed on 2yrs earlier, the NTSB report found the cause to be flying too low and failure to maintain control.

Fly safe folks.

http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/ntsb-plane-in-fatal-crash-was-flying-too-low/article_793d3742-d498-11de-8dd5-001cc4c002e0.html