Monday, January 30, 2017

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters Inc dba Tampa Bay Aviation: Accident occurred January 26, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Pinellas County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Tampa, Florida  

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N2382R

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA095
Date & Time: 01/26/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N2382R
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 26, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172R, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters, Inc., dba Tampa Bay Aviation, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at the Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated about 30 minutes earlier from CLW.

The pilot stated that he performed a preflight inspection of the rental airplane but elected to have it fueled because of the on-board fuel load. He finished his preflight inspection after fueling, which included an inspection of the undamaged propeller, but did note the passenger door was difficult to close, and he had an issue with his lap belt, but was able to secure it. After engine start, he taxied to runway 16, where he performed an engine run-up with no discrepancies noted.

After takeoff, he flew west towards the beach but elected to return after seeing adverse weather nearby. He entered the traffic pattern at CLW for runway 16, which was equipped with a visual approach slope indicator, but he did not turn it on. He turned the airplane onto the base leg of the traffic pattern and then onto final approach leg of the traffic pattern, where he maintained 65 mph with the flaps extended 30 degrees, and reported descending at the standard rate with no airspeed fluctuations. On his first landing attempt about at touchdown, the airplane encountered a strong wind gust which caused the airplane to climb "a little bit", or about 10 feet. He performed a go-around, and re-entered the traffic pattern for runway 16. The pilot conducted the second landing attempt with 10 degrees of flaps extended, maintaining 65 mph while on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, and reported the, "touchdown was perfect soft" on the numbers. He did not experience a propeller strike on landing, and then taxied to the tie-down area where he secured the airplane. He then went inside the fixed-base operator and wrote up the discrepancies related to the lap belt, and for a fuel gauge which indicated 5 gallons after fueling.

According to the operator, their review of airport surveillance video revealed that later that same day, maintenance personnel of the operator went to the airplane, which had not been moved or damaged, and observed damage to the propeller. Additionally, review of aircraft operational records and the airplane's hour meter revealed that the airplane had not been operated since it was returned. During hand rotation of the propeller, maintenance personnel heard internal engine damage, and subsequently noted damage to the firewall. The oil pressure-activated hour meter reading when the mechanics inspected the airplane was the same as when the pilot returned the airplane. Subsequent testing of the hour meter with FAA oversight revealed it operated satisfactory with no discrepancies.

The operator reported that the airplane was flown the evening before on a training flight with a student and instructor, and at the conclusion of their uneventful flight, the airplane was secured. They also indicated that airport surveillance video depicted the accident pilot inspecting the propeller after securing the airplane at the conclusion of the flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/02/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/09/2016
Flight Time:  450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 300 hours (Total, this make and model), 450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2382R
Model/Series: 172 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17280700
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/12/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6955.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: CLEARWATER HELICOPTERS INC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: CLEARWATER HELICOPTERS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Tampa Bay Aviation
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CLW, 71 ft msl
Observation Time: 1255 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1900 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 20°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots/ 16 knots, 220°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 EST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Clearwater Airpark (CLW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:  4108 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  27.977222, -82.759167 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2382R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 26, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172R, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters, Inc., dba Tampa Bay Aviation, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at the Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated about 30 minutes earlier from CLW.

The pilot stated that he performed a preflight inspection of the airplane which included a check of the propeller and did not notice any damage. He did note the passenger door was difficult to close, and had an issue with his lap belt, but was able to secure it. After engine start, he taxied to runway 16, where he performed an engine run-up with no discrepancies noted. After takeoff, he flew west towards the beach but noticed adverse weather to the north and south of their location. He elected to return to CLW and entered the traffic pattern for runway 16, which was equipped with a visual approach slope indicator, but he did not turn it on. He turned the airplane onto the base leg of the traffic pattern and then onto final approach leg of the traffic pattern, where he maintained 65 mph with the flaps extended 30 degrees, and reported descending at the standard rate with no airspeed fluctuations. On his first landing attempt about at touchdown, the airplane encountered a strong wind gust which caused the airplane to climb "a little bit." He performed a go-around, and re-entered the traffic pattern for runway 16. The pilot conducted the second landing attempt with 10 degrees of flaps extended. He maintained 65 mph while on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, and reported the, "touchdown was perfect soft" on the numbers. He further reported the airplane did not have a propeller strike on landing, and he taxied to the tie-down area, secured the airplane, then went inside the fixed-base operator and wrote up the discrepancies related to the door and lap belt.

Later that same day, maintenance personnel of the operator went to the airplane, which had not been moved or operated since it was returned, and observed damage to the propeller. After noting internal engine damage, they towed the airplane into their hangar, and upon removal of the engine cowling, noticed firewall damage.

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