Thursday, January 26, 2017

Beech F35 Bonanza, N4213B: Accident occurred January 26, 2017 near Gimlin Airport (18MO), Ozark, Christian County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.govN4213B 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: MCI FSDO


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA097 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Ozark, MO
Aircraft: BEECH BE35, registration: N4213B
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 26, 2017, about 1525 central standard time, a Beech BE35 single engine airplane, N4213B, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the ground after a collision with power lines while on VFR approach to the Gimlin Airport (18MO), Ozark, Missouri. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and one pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The personal local flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from 18MO about 1430. 

According to the pilot, the flight was intended to gain some experience in his recently purchased airplane. After completing about 10 touch and go landings at a nearby airport, the flight was returning to 18MO for a full stop landing. The pilot announced the he was entering a left downwind to runway 36, reduced speed, and lowered the landing gear. Upon turning to final approach, the pilot lowered the flaps and was concentrating on lining up the airplane on runway centerline. The pilot stated that he did not see the power lines and the last thing he remembered is "something exploding in his face," and opening his eyes inside the wreckage. 

The pilot-rated passenger stated that the airplane was lined up with the runway on final and he felt that the airplane was a little low, but thought that the pilot was making a flat, power-on approach, due to the crosswinds. Upon passing over a tree line, he stated that the pilot surprised him by pulling back the power instead of adding power. The airplane seem to sink into the power lines.

After colliding with the power lines, the airplane impacted the ground and tumbled inverted, resulting in substantial damage. The power lines were located about 1/4 mile from the airport. Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane had collided with the top 2 lines of a 4-line power line. The propeller struck the top line and the nose gear hit the second line down. The airplane hit the ground with the right wing, tumbled, and came to rest inverted.






The National Transportation Safety Board has released its preliminary aviation accident report on the Jan. 26 plane crash that occurred at Gimlin Airport just outside Ozark and injured two.

The report says the Beech BE35 single-engine airplane collided with power lines while on approach to Gimlin Airport at 2:25 p.m. Jan. 26. The airport is located off W Highway in Ozark. The accident occurred just south of Galena Road and east of W Highway.

The plane is owned by Texas resident Nick R. Gilley, who was also the pilot that day. The passenger is not named in the NTSB report, but local officials on scene said he was an Ozark resident.

“The private pilot sustained minor injuries and one pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries,” the report says.

The accident occurred when the plane collided with power lines, located about a quarter-mile from the airport, causing it to crash into the ground.

“Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane had collided with the top two lines of a four-line power line,” the report says. “The propeller struck the top line and the nose gear hit the second line down. The airplane hit the ground with the right wing, tumbled and came to rest inverted.”

According to the report, Gilley told investigators the flight “was intended to gain some experience in his recently purchased airplane.”

“After completing about 10 touch-and-go landings at a nearby airport, the flight was returning to 18MO for a full-stop landing,” the report says. “The pilot announced that he was entering a left downwind to runway 36, reduced speed and lowered the landing gear. Upon returning to final approach, the pilot lowered the flaps and was concentrating on lining up the airplane on runway centerline. The pilot stated that he did not see the power lines and the last thing he remembered is something exploding in his face, and opening his eyes inside the wreckage.”

The passenger, who has a pilot’s license, said that the plane was lined up with the runway “a little low.”

“...But (he) thought that the pilot was making a flat, power-on approach, due to the crosswinds,” the report says. “Upon passing over a tree line, he stated that the pilot surprised him by pulling back the power instead of adding power. The airplane seemed to sink into the power lines.”

The crash knocked out power to nearly 500 White River Valley Electric members, but crews had power back up later that evening.

NTSB investigator Alexander Lemishko investigated the crash along with Federal Aviation Administration investigator James Seabolt. The NTSB and FAA are agencies responsible for investigating aircraft crashes. The report, which says this is preliminary information and subject to change, notes that the NTSB did not travel to the scene of the accident.


Source:  http://ccheadliner.com




Delbert Sinor of Ozark is shown in this recent photo with his wife, Ozark County native Shirley Luna Sinor. Sinor suffered injuries and was hospitalized after the Jan. 26 crash of a private plane south of Ozark. The other person in the plane has not been publicly identified.







Editor’s note: This story by reporter Mike Landis and videographer Robin Foster, with Scott Brady and Sean Barnhill also contributing, is reprinted from KY3.com. It describes a Jan. 26 plane crash that, the Times has learned, involved Ozark resident Delbert Sinor, husband of Ozark County native Shirley Luna Sinor and son-in-law of Gainesville resident Bonnie Luna. After being treated for his injuries at a Springfield hospital, Sinor is now recovering at home, family members say. The other person in the plane, who was at the controls at the time of the crash, has not been publicly identified.

A small plane hit some power lines and crashed near a rural air strip between Ozark and Chadwick on Thursday afternoon. Christian County Sheriff Brad Cole said two people in the plane have moderate to severe injuries.

The Gimlin asphalt airstrip is next to Highway W south of Missouri 14 between Ozark and Chadwick. The crash occurred shortly before 2:30 p.m.

Stan Smith, a freelance photographer, said the plane was a Beechcraft Bonanza. He was in the airport office when it took off about 45 minutes before the crash. He said the two people in the plane were a flight instructor and the new owner of the plane.

Smith said the two planned to fly all afternoon for insurance purposes, but something happened and they had to make an emergency landing, which is when the plane hit power lines 200 to 300 yards from the runway.

Christian County Sheriff’s deputies, state troopers, Ozark firefighters and paramedics rushed to the scene. A battalion chief says there was no fire and no one was trapped in the wreckage. The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The crash knocked out electric service to some people in the area. White River Electric Cooperative’s website reported 484 outages. ... White River restored power to all of its members by about 7:30 p.m.

KY3 editor’s note: An earlier version of this report said Stan Smith heard at the airport that the plane had engine trouble. Smith said later that he went to the hospital and talked to the injured men, and they said the plane did not have engine trouble. They described the problem as pilot error.


Source:   http://www.ozarkcountytimes.com





OZARK, Mo. (KY3) - A small plane hit some power lines and crashed near a rural air strip between Ozark and Chadwick on Thursday afternoon. Sheriff Brad Cole said two people in the plane have moderate to severe injuries.

The Gimlin grass airstrip is next to Highway W, south of Missouri 14. The crash was between 2:30 and 3:00.

Stan Smith, a freelance photographer, said the plane is a Beechcraft Bonanza. He said he was in the airport office when it took off about 45 minutes before the crash. He said the people in the plane are a flight instructor and the new owner of the plane.

Smith said the owner and the instructor planned to fly all afternoon for insurance purposes but something happened and they had to make an emergency landing, which is when it hit power lines near the airport.

Christian County sheriff's deputies, state troopers, Ozark firefighters and paramedics rushed to the scene. A battalion chief says there was no fire and no one was trapped in the wreckage. The chief said the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The crash knocked out electric service to some people in the area. White River Electric Cooperative's website reported 484 outages shortly before 4 p.m.

Source:   http://www.ky3.com









CHRISTIAN COUNTY, Mo. -- Two people have been injured in a plane crash in Christian County this afternoon.

Christian County Sheriff Lieutenant Jeff Lofton confirms that a private single-engine fixed wing plane crashed at a small airport near Route W and Galena Road.

No fatalities were reported but both passenger and pilot suffered moderate injuries. Both were transported by ground to a healthcare facility.

A cause of the crash has not been determined at this time. The investigation is ongoing.

Source:   http://www.ozarksfirst.com

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