Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Cessna 172, N8184B: Accident occurred July 17, 2016 in Emmett, Gem County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8184B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8184B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146B
14 CFR operation of Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN, registration: unknown
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot of a red and white Cessna was conducting a personal local flight. The pilot reported that, about 10 minutes into the flight, the pilot of an unknown aircraft contacted him over the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) and stated “we almost got you.” However, the pilot later reported that he had not heard any previous communications from other aircraft in the local area on the CTAF, that he did not observe any aircraft nearby at the time of the radio call, and that he did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane, so he chose to continue the flight. He landed about 40 minutes later at his originating airport. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the rudder, which displayed a lateral tear and a blue paint mark at the trailing edge of the control surface. Although the pilot did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane, the blue paint mark and rudder damage indicates that his airplane’s rudder was contacted by another object during the flight.

The unknown pilot’s statement, “we almost got you,” suggests that the unknown pilot also might not have been aware that the two aircraft actually collided; however, this could not be confirmed because the pilot and other aircraft were never identified.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of both pilots to see and avoid each other during cruise flight, which resulted in a midair collision.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho, at approximately 0920. 

According to the pilot, he departed runway 28, and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. After he exited the traffic pattern on the downwind leg, the pilot flew east for approximately 2 miles and then turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot had not observed any aircraft in his range of view and elected to continue the flight. He landed about 40 minutes later and parked the airplane, but as he tied it down on the airport ramp, he observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he monitored the airport CTAF, and had not heard any reports from anyone near the town of Emmett or transitioning through the town during the flight. He further stated that he did not observe any damage to the rudder before he departed. The pilot did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane between his departure and the time he received the radio call. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the airplane rudder, which displayed a lateral tear and a blue mark at the trailing edge of the control surface. 

The other aircraft was not identified at any point during the investigation. A review of FAA radar data from 0820 and 0840 showed a total of three radar targets that passed through the town of Emmett. Two of the targets appeared as VFR primary radar targets, and did not display aircraft registration numbers. According to the pilot of the third target, identified as N471AM, he was on a cross country flight from Cascade, Idaho, to Nampa, Idaho, and was following a friend who was flying a brown and orange airplane. The pilot stated that he did not encounter a near mid-air collision at any point during the flight, and photographs of N471AM revealed that the airplane paint scheme did not contain any traces of blue consistent with the mark on the rudder of N8184B. 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook states,

"Collision Avoidance

All pilots must be alert to the potential for midair collision and near midair collisions… This concept requires that vigilance shall be maintained at all times, by each person operating an aircraft regardless of whether the operation is conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR) or visual flight rules (VFR)…Most midair collision accidents and reported near midair collision incidents occur in good VFR weather conditions and during the hours of daylight. Most of these accident/incidents occur within 5 miles of an airport and/or near navigation aids."

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8184B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho at approximately 0920. 


According to the pilot, he departed runway 28 and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. He exited the traffic pattern and flew east for approximately 2 miles after which he turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot did not observe another airplane in his field of view and elected to continue the flight. After he landed about 40 minutes later, the pilot tied down the airplane and observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he did not observe any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies at any point during the flight. 


The other airplane was not identified and a preliminary review of Federal Aviation Administration radar data did not show any aircraft that were operating in the area at the time of the radio call.


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146B
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Aircraft: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN, registration: unknown
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho at approximately 0920. 

According to the pilot, he departed runway 28 and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. He exited the traffic pattern and flew east for approximately 2 miles after which he turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot did not observe another airplane in his field of view and elected to continue the flight. After he landed about 40 minutes later, the pilot tied down the airplane and observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he did not observe any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies at any point during the flight. 

A preliminary review of Federal Aviation Administration radar data did not show any aircraft that were operating in the area at the time of the radio call.

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