Saturday, March 26, 2016

Aerospatiale AS 350B2, N911GF, registered to Haynes Life Flight LLC and operated by Metro Aviation Inc : Fatal accident occurred March 26, 2016 in Enterprise, Alabama

Analysis 

After picking up a patient at a motor vehicle accident (MVA) site, the airline transport pilot of the helicopter air ambulance flight, which was operating under visual flight rules (VFR), departed in dark night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) to transport the patient to a hospital; a flight nurse and paramedic were also on board. Witness statements, video, and photographs indicated that reduced visibility in fog and mist as well as very-light-to-light precipitation existed at the MVA site, and the nearest weather station, 4 miles away, was reporting a 300-ft ceiling and 3 miles visibility. Radar data indicated that, after takeoff, the helicopter entered a left turn and climbed to 1,000 ft above mean sea level (msl). The rate of turn then began to increase, and, after reaching a peak altitude of 1,100 ft msl, the helicopter began a rapid descent that continued to ground impact. According to the radar data, the flight lasted about 1 minute. A search was initiated when the pilot did not check in with the communications center as required, and the wreckage was located the next morning about 1/2 mile from the departure location. Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the helicopter struck trees and terrain and was highly fragmented. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the helicopter.

Although the helicopter was not certificated for flight in IMC, it had sufficient instrumentation to operate in the event of an inadvertent encounter with IMC and was equipped with a helicopter terrain avoidance warning system, a night vision imaging system which included night vision goggles (NVGs), and an autopilot. The pilot had about 265 hours experience operating in IMC and had been trained in inadvertent IMC loss of control recovery, but he was not instrument current. Further, he had not been trained or qualified by the operator to fly in IMC. He was likely using NVGs during the flight as one of the first responders who helped load the patient into the helicopter saw the pilot wearing them. Based on the weather conditions, the flight path of the helicopter, and the lack of preimpact failures or anomalies, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation after entering IMC and subsequently lost control of the helicopter.

To accomplish operational control of its flights, the operator used an operational control center (OCC) that was staffed 24 hours a day by operational control coordinators. According to the operator, the pilot had the final authority and responsibility for decisions relating to safety of flight, and the operational control coordinators were responsible for confirming whether a flight or series of flights could be initiated, conducted, or terminated safely, in accordance with the authorizations, limitations, and procedures in their operations manual, and the applicable regulations. In the case of the accident flight, the operator's required VFR weather minimums were a 1,000-ft ceiling with a flight visibility of 3 miles.

The operational control coordinators' role was accomplished by inputting flight data into software programs that would perform automated database queries for pilot currency and aircraft maintenance information and would provide weather information based upon route of flight. Both OCC personnel and pilots had the authority to terminate a flight at any time if required conditions were not met. There were two personnel on duty before and during the time of the accident at the operator's OCC, a trainee operational control coordinator and a senior operational control coordinator. About 1 hour before the helicopter accident, the OCC received notification of the request for the helicopter to respond to the MVA, and the coordinators used a software program called "OCC Helper" to query weather information. Although the coordinates for the location of the MVA provided to the OCC were correct, the format of the coordinates was not the correct format for OCC Helper. Therefore, the OCC Helper software only recognized the MVA site as being near the helicopter's base, which was reporting visual meteorological conditions, and did not show the IMC being reported at weather stations closer to the MVA site. The trainee reported that latitude and longitude format was a common problem with OCC Helper and, at times, required OCC personnel to reformat the latitude and longitude coordinates to get the coordinates to work in OCC Helper. On the night of the accident, the incorrectly formatted latitude and longitude for the MVA site were not corrected in OCC Helper until after the helicopter had departed its base en route to the MVA site. Given the IMC weather conditions being reported, which were below the required VFR weather minimums for the flight, the OCC coordinators should have provided the pilot with additional weather information after they had correctly input the coordinates of the MVA site into the OCC Helper software; however, they did not do so. The lack of monitoring of the flight by the OCC through direct human interaction due to overreliance on mission support software and other automated aids, and the incorrectly interpreted latitude and longitude information by both the software and the operational control coordinators resulted in a loss of operational control. Although the software formatting issues were known, there was no standard operating procedure to mitigate the problem.

The pilot had access to internet-based weather information at the helicopter's base, but it is unknown what weather information the pilot reviewed before beginning the flight to the MVA. However, text messages between the pilot and a friend and between the flight nurse on the accident flight and the same friend indicated that the pilot was aware of the possibility of encountering IMC before he departed the base for the MVA site. Further, after landing at the MVA, the pilot would have been aware that the weather conditions at the site were below the company's VFR weather minimums. Given the weather conditions at the MVA site, the pilot should have canceled the flight or, at a minimum, contacted the OCC to obtain updated weather information and guidance. However, the pilot's fixation on completing the mission probably motivated him to depart on the accident flight in IMC, even though significantly less risky alternatives existed, such as canceling the flight and transporting the patient by ground ambulance.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to perform visual flight rules flight into night instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in loss of control due to spatial disorientation. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's self-induced pressure to complete the mission despite the weather conditions and the operator's inadequate oversight of the flight by its operational control center.

Findings

Aircraft
Performance/control parameters - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Spatial disorientation - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Motivation/respond to pressure - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Dark - Effect on operation (Cause)
Low ceiling - Effect on operation (Cause)
Low visibility - Effect on operation (Cause)
Clouds - Effect on operation (Cause)
Obscuration - Effect on operation (Cause)
Drizzle/mist - Effect on operation (Cause)
Fog - Effect on operation (Cause)
Below VFR minima - Effect on operation (Cause)

Organizational issues
Oversight of operation - Operator (Factor)

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; FAA / AVP-100; Washington, District of Columbia
Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses (BEA); Le Bourget, France
Metro Aviation Inc.; Shreveport, Louisiana 
Haynes Life Flight LLC.; Montgomery, Alabama 
Airbus Helicopters Inc.; Grand Prairie, Texas
Turbomeca USA; Grand Prairie, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N911GF

The victims in the March 26, 2016 Haynes Life Flight crash, clockwise, are: Chad Hammond, Stacey Cernadas, Zach Strickland and Jason Snipes. 

Location: Enterprise, AL
Accident Number: ERA16FA140
Date & Time: 03/26/2016, 0018 CDT
Registration: N911GF
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350 B2
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 26, 2016, about 0018 central daylight time, a Eurocopter AS350 B2, N911GF, impacted trees and terrain near Enterprise, Alabama. The airline transport pilot, flight nurse, flight paramedic, and patient being transported were fatally injured. The helicopter, which was registered to Haynes Life Flight LLC and operated by Metro Aviation, Inc., was substantially damaged. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as a helicopter air ambulance flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan. The flight departed from a farm field near Goodman, Alabama, about 0017, and was destined for Baptist Medical Center Heliport (AL11), Montgomery, Alabama.

According to the Coffee County Sheriff's Office, on March 25, 2016, about 2309, sheriff's deputies and the Enterprise Rescue Squad were dispatched to a motor vehicle accident (MVA) near Goodman, Alabama. A sheriff's deputy contacted Haynes Ambulance Communication Center (HCC) by cellular phone when he learned that the motor vehicle was overturned and that an unconscious victim was inside.

According to communications records, HCC received the call from the deputy at 2319:10. The pilot of the helicopter, was notified at 2320:38. The helicopter, which was known as "Life Flight 2" and was based at the Troy Regional Medical Center, Troy, Alabama, departed Troy at 2326:57 and arrived at the landing zone (LZ) in a farm field adjacent to the MVA site at 2353:15.

Witnesses stated that, after touchdown, the pilot remained in the helicopter with the engine running. The flight paramedic and flight nurse exited the helicopter and entered the Enterprise Rescue Squad ambulance to help prepare the patient for transport.

Once the patient was ready for transport, the flight nurse, flight paramedic, and several other emergency responders rolled the gurney about 70 yards through a grassy area to the helicopter and loaded the patient on-board. One of the first responders later reported that he noticed that the pilot had something over his eyes "like sunglasses, but it was square looking." Once the patient had been loaded, the flight nurse and flight paramedic also boarded, and, at 0016:45, the helicopter lifted off and turned north toward AL11.

Review of radar data provided by the United States Army from the approach control radar site at Cairns Army Airfield (OZR), Fort Rucker, Alabama, located about 13 nautical miles east of the accident site, indicated that, the helicopter was first identified on radar after takeoff at 0017:35. The helicopter was in a shallow left turn and climbing to 1,000 ft above mean sea level. At 0018:04, the rate of turn began to increase and continued to increase over the next 4 seconds when the helicopter reached a peak altitude of 1,100 ft. The helicopter remained at this altitude and continued the left turn until 0018:28 when the helicopter began a rapid descent. Five seconds later, radar indicated that helicopter had descended through 600 ft. Moments later, the helicopter descended below the floor of the radar coverage area, and radar contact was lost. According to the radar data, the flight lasted about 1 minute.

According to HCC, the helicopter's on-board Skyconnect satellite tracking system updated every 3 minutes, and the pilot was supposed to contact them every 15 minutes. However, after the helicopter lifted off, HCC did not receive the pilot's normal 15-minute check-in, and, when they checked the satellite tracking system, it showed that it had not updated and that the helicopter was still at the LZ. HCC then began to notify authorities that they believed that the helicopter was down somewhere. About 0700, after an extensive search, search parties began to smell what they believed was jet fuel and eventually located the wreckage in a swampy, heavily wooded area.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Metro Aviation, and pilot records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a helicopter rating and type ratings for the Agusta Westland AB-139 and AW-139. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter.

The pilot was hired as a flight instructor in June 2009 by Helicopters of America. He then became their lead flight instructor and worked for them until September 2009 when the company ceased operation. He was then hired by Cloud 9 Helicopters, where he became senior flight instructor.

On April 14, 2011, he was hired by Petroleum Helicopters International (PHI). When hired by PHI, he had accrued 2,448 total hours of helicopter flight experience and had flown the R22, R44, H269, AS355, MD500, MD600, and A109.

At PHI, he flew the AW139 as both a first officer (co-pilot) and a captain (pilot) in both visual flight rules (VFR) and instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. During his tenure at PHI, he accrued an additional 1,889.63 flight hours supporting oil and gas contracts until he left their employment on November 16, 2015.

At the time of the accident, the pilot had been employed by Metro Aviation for about 6 months and had accumulated 90 hours of flight experience in the accident helicopter make and model since he was hired. His total flight experience was 5,301 hours of which 5,265 hours were as pilot in command, 474 hours were at night, and 265 hours were in actual instrument conditions. His flight experience during the 90 days before the accident was 47 hours, including 20 hours in the 30 days before the accident.

Review of Metro Aviation/PHI training records indicated that he had received training in human factors and decision-making, night operations, night vision goggles (NVGs), and inadvertent entry into IMC. He did not meet currency requirements for flight in IMC at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was manufactured in 1998. It was equipped with a three-blade main rotor system and a two-blade tail rotor system and was powered by a Turbomeca Arriel 1D1 engine rated at 641 shaft horsepower. The helicopter was equipped with skid-type landing gear, a night vision imaging system (NVIS), which consisted of NVGs and NVG-compatible lighting, a helicopter terrain avoidance warning system (HTAWS), and an autopilot. The helicopter was not certificated for flight in IMC.

According to Metro Aviation, the helicopter was maintained under an FAA-approved aircraft inspection program. The helicopter's most recent inspection was completed on February 12, 2016. At the time of the accident, the helicopter had accrued 8,923.2 total hours of operation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Videos, Photographs, and Witness Information

Witness statements indicated that fog, mist, and reduced visibility existed at the MVA site at the time of the helicopter's arrival. Witness statements, photographs, and videos also indicated that these conditions were still present when the helicopter lifted off about 23 minutes later.

Review of witness videos and photographs of the accident flight revealed that, during the takeoff sequence, very light to light precipitation was falling in the field surrounding the helicopter. The precipitation was also visible in the helicopter's landing light beams directed forward from the helicopter.

According to one witness, there was slight drizzle around the time of the takeoff, and, although there was no ground fog, there may have been fog above the trees. Another witness stated that there was a heavy mist, and the ceiling was "very low, maybe 100 foot." This witness also stated he could see the tops of the trees, and, by shining his flashlight up, he could easily tell that the fog started about two to three times as high as the nearest tree. Another witness stated that, at the time of the helicopter's departure, the fog was mixed with rain and was "kind of pretty thick." This witness also mentioned that the helicopter flew over the road, which was not far from the LZ, and the witness lost visual contact with the helicopter due to the fog.

Surface Analysis Chart

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 0100 depicted a stationary front that stretched from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico north-northeastward into southeastern Alabama and northeastward into western South Carolina. A low-pressure center was located in eastern Alabama. The station models around the accident site depicted air temperatures in the low to mid 60's degrees Fahrenheit (°F), with temperature-dew point spreads of 1°F or less, a southeast to east wind below 10 knots, cloudy skies, and fog. Areas near frontal boundaries with low temperature-dewpoint spreads at the surface are typically locations conducive to the formation of low clouds and fog, and, if enough moisture is available, precipitation can also be present.

Surface Observations

Enterprise Municipal Airport (EDN), located 4 miles east-northeast of the accident site, was the closest official weather station to the accident site and had an Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS). EDN weather at 0015 was reported as wind from 120° at 4 knots, 3 miles visibility, drizzle, an overcast ceiling at 300 ft above ground level (agl), temperature of 17°C, dew point temperature of 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. EDN weather at 0035 was reported as wind from 120° at 4 knots, 3 miles visibility, drizzle, an overcast ceiling at 300 ft agl, temperature of 17°C, dew point temperature of 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

Observations from other stations near the accident site also indicated low instrument flight rules (LIFR) conditions due to ceilings below 500 ft agl at the accident time.

Satellite Data

Visible and infrared images obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 13 indicated abundant cloud cover over the accident site at the time of the accident. The cloud tops near the accident site were moving from southwest to northeast. Based on the brightness temperatures above the accident site and the vertical temperature profile, the cloud-top heights over the accident site were about 16,000 ft at 0115.

Radar Imagery Information

The closest NWS Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) was located 28 nautical miles east-northeast of the accident site at an elevation of 434 ft, at Fort Rucker, Alabama. The WSR-88D base reflectivity images indicated very light precipitation between AL11 and the automobile accident site before 2320 on March 25. The very light to light precipitation continued to form, increase in area coverage, and move over the automobile accident site while the helicopter was en route and while the helicopter was on the ground loading the patient. The accident flight likely took off in drizzle or light rain conditions, and these precipitation conditions persisted through the accident time.

Airmen's Meteorological Information

Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMET) Sierra for IFR conditions due to mist was issued at 2145 on March 25 and was valid at the accident time. There was another AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions due to mist and precipitation that was also valid just east of the accident site for portions of Georgia and northwestern Florida. These AIRMETs were valid at the time flight notification at 2321 on March 25 all the way through the accident flight time.

Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAFs)

OZR and Dothan Regional Airport (DHN), Dothan, Alabama, located XX miles and XX miles from the accident site, respectively, both had TAFs that forecast IFR or LIFR conditions at the accident time, and both OZR and DHN TAFs were issued well before the time the pilot was notified of the mission.
National Weather Service Discussion

The National Weather Service Office in Tallahassee, Florida, issued an Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) at 1929 on March 25 for the area surrounding the accident site. The aviation section of the AFD mentioned that IFR conditions would be present at all airports overnight with improving conditions by the daytime on March 26.

Astronomical Data

Moonrise occurred at 2103 on March 25. The phase of the moon was waning gibbous with 91% of the moon's visible disk illuminated. .

For further details concerning meteorological information, refer to the Meteorology Report in the public docket for this accident investigation.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Accident Site Examination

Examination of the accident site revealed that the helicopter had struck trees about 1/2 mile north of the motor vehicle accident site. A debris path ran from south to north at a downward angle of about 45° through the trees and led to the helicopter.

Airframe and Rotor System Examination

The wreckage was heavily fragmented with only the aft fuselage being easily recognizable. The fuel tank was broken open, and the smell of jet fuel was present. The engine and transmission were separated from their mounts. The main wreckage was resting at the base of a large tree, and other 80-ft- to 100-ft-tall trees along the debris path exhibited impact damage and evidence of blade strikes. Examination of the main rotor blades (MRBs) indicated that the main rotor was under power during the accident sequence, and the blue and red MRBs were broken in mutual locations.

The tail boom displayed a right horizontal bend mid-span; the right horizontal stabilizer and the tail rotor remained attached to the tail boom. Control continuity and rotation were confirmed from the tailrotor to the aft bulkhead. The left horizontal stabilizer was separated from its mounting location. The tail rotor pedals were separated from their mounting locations. Tail rotor pedal control continuity through the tail rotor flex ball cable was confirmed.

Continuity was confirmed through the transmission, and all three main rotor actuators (left roll, right roll, and pitch) and the tail rotor actuator were identified along with their associated hardware. No abnormalities with hydraulic servo integrity were noted, and all push-pull tubes and mixing unit actuators were broken and exhibited signatures consistent with overload signatures.

Main Rotor Actuators Examination

The left roll actuator remained attached to the stationary star by its rod-end bearing, and the other two main rotor actuators were detached and torn from the stationary star and rod-end bearings. The right roll actuator adaptor casing showed an approximately 2.5-inch break from the threaded attachment fitting to the stationary star. All main rotor actuator servo input rods remained attached to the rotor mast casing and could be moved by hand in and out of each adaptor casing. All three servo input rods showed evidence of bending. All three main rotor accumulators were intact with the right roll and left roll accumulators showing slight dents on their outer surfaces. Pressure from each of the main rotor accumulators was released via its Schrader valve. At least 120 psi of pressure was released from each accumulator, indicating the accumulators were normally charged.

Tail Rotor Actuator Examination

The tail rotor actuator unit was still attached to the airframe, the servo accumulator, and the load compensator. The hydraulic input and return lines exhibited evidence of hydraulic fluid being present. The tail rotor accumulator was intact and released 50 psi of pressure via its Schrader valve, indicating the accumulator was normally charged.

Attitude Indicator and Directional Gyro Examination

The attitude indicator was disassembled and examined. The gyro showed rotational scoring on the inner and outer housings consistent with rotation at the time of impact. The directional gyro was also disassembled and examined. The gyro showed scoring on the inner and outer housings consistent with rotation at the time of impact.

Fuel Filters Examination

The helicopter was fitted with a standard engine fuel filter attached to the fuel control unit and an aftermarket airframe fuel filtering system. Both fuel filter housing units were clean and free of debris. Both filters also appeared to be clean and unobstructed.

Engine Examination

The engine displayed external impact damage. The free turbine blades remained intact. The fuel control unit (FCU) was separated from the accessory gearbox; both FCU shafts were present and intact; the FCU remained attached by the fuel and air lines. The P2 line was still attached to both the intermediate case and the FCU.

The axial compressor had foreign object damage on all 13 blades and curling opposite the direction of rotation was observed on several blades. Both the Module 1 and the Module 5 magnetic plugs were clean. Both electric chip detectors (main and TU208 rear bearing) were clean. Module 5 was removed, and the input pinion slippage mark was found displaced in the over-torqued direction about 2 to 2.5 millimeters, a measurement consistent with engine power being produced at the time of main rotor strike.

The freewheel shaft was checked, and proper operation confirmed. Continuity to the N2 drive of the FCU was confirmed. The gas generator could not be turned by hand, and the free turbine could not be turned by hand.

The oil, air, and fuel lines were found connected to engine and properly secured. The electrical connection cannon plugs were still connected to the engine deck; the harnesses had been broken during the impact sequence. The rear engine mount was still connected to the linking tube, but both rubber mounts were separated from the engine deck. The front support was broken at the connection to the aircraft liaison tube.

The transmission shaft was found inside the liaison tube but neither side flector groups, nor bolts were connected to it. The flector group on the engine side was still connected to the flanged adapter, and on the freewheel shaft. The 3 bolts from the main gearbox input, to the transmission shaft had been broken, and the holes were found elongated opposite the direction of rotation consistent with power being produced at the time of main rotor strike.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, Montgomery, Alabama, performed postmortem examinations on all three crew members and the patient. The cause of death for all four occupants was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of the pilot. The specimens from the pilot were negative for all tested drugs. Testing for ethanol, carbon monoxide and cyanide was not performed.

ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION

Metro Aviation

Metro Aviation was incorporated in 1982 as a helicopter charter, flight training, and maintenance operation. They entered the air medical service business in November 1983. At the time of the accident, Metro Aviation operated more than 130 aircraft out of 98 bases for more than 30 programs in 18 states across the country. Metro Aviation's operations division provided pilots and maintenance technicians for the aircraft in their various programs.

Haynes Ambulance

Haynes Ambulance was started in 1969 in Wetumpka, Alabama. In 1977, Haynes Ambulance of Alabama, Inc., was established in Montgomery Alabama. Haynes Life Flight LLC began operations in June 2014. At the time of the accident, Haynes Ambulance/Life Flight's operations covered three counties in Central Alabama (Elmore, Montgomery, and Pike) as well as Maxwell Air Force Base. Additionally, they had a variety of mutual aid agreements with various surrounding cities, counties, municipal, and private agencies.

Haynes Ambulance/Life Flight covered an area of about 1,420 square miles from 9 strategically located stations throughout their service area. About 180 full-time and part-time emergency medical technicians (EMT) and paramedics cared for emergency and convalescent patients, serving a population of over 500,000 citizens with over 35 ground ambulances and 2 helicopters.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Aeronautical Decision-making

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making, "pilots, particularly those with considerable experience, as a rule always try to complete a flight as planned, please passengers, meet schedules, and generally demonstrate that they have 'the right stuff'." One of the common behavioral traps identified was "Get-There-Itis." According to the AC, "common among pilots, [get-there-itis] clouds the vision and impairs judgment by causing a fixation on the original goal or destination combined with a total disregard for any alternative course of action." Get-There-Itis is also known as hurry syndrome, plan continuation, or goal fixation.

Metro Aviation Operations Manual

According to Metro Aviation's Operations Manual, the pilot-in-command of an aircraft had the final authority and responsibility for decisions relating to safety of flight and was required to select the most conservative course of action if a conflict arose concerning a Metro Aviation policy, procedure, or regulation. Operational control coordinators and operational control supervisors were responsible for confirming whether a flight or series of flights could be initiated, conducted, or terminated safely, in accordance with the authorizations, limitations, and procedures in the Metro Aviation Operations Manual and the applicable regulations. They were also "authorized to terminate a flight for any reason that may be contrary to [Federal aviation regulations] FARs or policy."

Weather minimums were also published in the operations manual for all VFR operations. Review of the weather minimums indicated that:

- When flying at night using an approved NVIS or HTAWS in non-mountainous, local flying areas, an 800-ft ceiling with a flight visibility of 3 statute miles was required.

- When flying at night using an approved NVIS or HTAWS in non-mountainous, non-local, flying areas, a 1,000-ft ceiling with a flight visibility of 3 statute miles was required.

Guidance for use of NVIS stated, "at no time shall NVGs be utilized to continue flight into weather below the minimums."

Guidance for inadvertent IMC or loss of visual surface reference stated:

"Inadvertent IMC does not only mean situations where an aircraft enters clouds, but also entering areas of reduced visibility, darkness with no ground lighting, and/or lowering ceiling resulting in the loss of visual ground reference. Pilots are expected to avoid inadvertent IMC and the loss of visual surface reference by maintaining situational awareness of weather changes and environmental conditions.

Pilots should be prepared for the possibility of inadvertent IMC or loss of visual surface reference. All company aircraft will carry current instrument approach charts and low altitude enroute maps for the area where the aircraft is assigned or expected to be flown. These charts and maps are to be used in the event that the aircraft enters into "inadvertent IMC" or "loss of visual reference". …

A minimum safe altitude [MSA] chart for each base local area will be carried on each base aircraft for quick reference by the pilot. ….

Minimum safe altitudes outside the local area will be 1000 feet above the maximum elevation figure as depicted on the VFR Sectional Chart for the aircraft location or the minimum off route obstruction clearance altitude as depicted on IFR Low En route chart. Inadvertent IMC is an emergency situation which requires maximum pilot attention. Good crew resource management is essential to safely deal with the emergency and make a successful recovery. Pilots will brief their medical crew members on their roles and responsibilities in the event of an inadvertent IMC prior to flight in marginal VFR conditions or en route if marginal VFR conditions are encountered."

The Operations Manual further advised that:

"In case of inadvertent IMC or Loss of visual surface reference the following procedure will be followed:

A. Maintain positive control of the aircraft with reference to instruments

1) Attitude – Level
2) Heading – Turn only to avoid known obstacles
3) Power – Adjust to climb power
4) Airspeed – Adjust to climb airspeed
5) Make turns no greater than standard rate

B. Climb to the minimum safe altitude (MSA) to clear all obstacles in the area.

C. Communicate

1) Declare an emergency to ATC
a. Squawk 7700
b. Report:
i. last known position,
ii. heading, altitude,
iii. fuel remaining, and
iv. souls on board

2) State nature of emergency (inadvertent IMC), intentions, and request for assistance
a. Weather: Determine if VFR conditions can be reached with ATC assistance.
b. Obstacles: Remain at or above a minimum safe altitude.
c. ATC can provide frequencies, vectors, courses, and altitude for airways and approaches.
d. If no assistance is available in the aircraft, use ATC for as much help as you need.
e. Complete the approach procedure to a landing or entering VMC conditions.
f. Maintain VMC and land."

Metro Aviation's Operational Control Center

According to Metro Aviation's Operations Manual, operational control is a two-tier system. The first tier involves the placement of an airworthy aircraft listed in the company's operations specifications and a current and qualified crew.

The second tier is determining whether a flight or series of flights can be initiated, conducted, or terminated safely and in accordance with all policies, procedures, general operations manual and regulations.

To accomplish operational control, Metro Aviation's Operational Control Center (OCC) was staffed 24 hours a day by operational control coordinators. The OCC continually monitored flight operations, weather trends, aircraft status, and any change that could affect the ability of the pilot to initiate, conduct, or terminate a flight or series of flights in accordance with the Metro Aviation Operations Manual, Operations Specifications, or Metro Operations Memos.

At the time of the accident, the OCC used two software systems to comply with Operations Specification A008-Operational Control (14 CFR 135.77- Responsibility for Operational Control and 14 CFR 135.79 Flight Locating Requirements). The first software system was the Metro Aviation Secure Website (MASW), acted as a central collection and processing point for operational information. Users logged into the system with a unique username and password and interacted within the system in accordance with the permissions granted by the company administrator. The MASW was routinely relied upon by Metro Aviation pilots, operational control coordinators, mechanics, aircraft records employees, pilot records employees, and partner communication centers/communication specialists.

The second software system was the OCC Helper (OH), which was developed by Metro Aviation to perform key compliance tasks and to monitor company flight operations. The primary logic of this application was focused on routine queries of company databases (pilot records, aircraft status reports, etc.), as well as outside resources such as NWS reports and forecasts. Operational control center coordinators were the only Metro Aviation employees trained and allowed access to OH.

Determination of pilot qualifications and aircraft status at the various bases was accomplished by the OCC using Operational Control Form 1 (OCF-1).

Metro Aviation required that, before commencing any flight operation, and after a pilot had logged-in for his/her assigned duty period and completed the pre-flight inspection of the aircraft assigned, the pilot was to complete the OCF-1 electronically using the MASW. Upon receiving the OCF-1 at the OCC, the OH software would query the Metro Aviation Pilot Records Database and display a summary view of the pilot's aircraft qualifications, currency, and medical certificate status. Additionally, the OH software would query the Metro Aviation Aircraft Records Database and provide a summary view of the aircraft's maintenance status. After reviewing these records and determining that they were appropriate, the operational control coordinator would electronically attest that the OCF-1 had been reviewed.

The OCF-1 was an editable form that pilots would routinely update throughout their assigned duty periods to report changes in weather, static risk, or aircraft maintenance status. Once the pilot completed an edit, the OCC would be prompted to perform an updated review of the form.

Flight locating requirements were addressed by the OCC using Operational Control Form 2 (OCF-2). The OCF-2 was the primary oversight for a specific Part 135 flight or series of flights. To achieve this oversight, Metro Aviation partnered with multiple communication centers throughout the country. Each communication center was associated with a specific Metro Aviation client's program. Some programs were just one base and one aircraft; others were several bases and several aircraft all associated with the same Metro Aviation client.

Communication center employees were not Metro Aviation employees; however, all the communication center employees were trained by Metro Aviation. This training was recognized in the approved Metro Aviation Training Manual and was conducted both initially and then annually for currency requirements.

The communications center's primary role in Metro Aviation flight operations was communicating flight requests to the Metro Aviation pilots and the Metro Aviation OCC. In the example of a car accident response, the first responder on scene (ambulance, fire dept., etc.) would make the initial request for the aircraft to the communication center, who would then notify the Metro Aviation pilot. The Metro Aviation pilot would then analyze the request in accordance with the Metro Aviation Operations Manual, Metro Aviation Training Program, Operations Specifications, and Federal Aviation Regulations and either accept or decline the flight. Whether accepted or declined by the pilot, the communication center would submit the OCF-2 to the OCC.

The OCF-2 was an electronic form accessed through the MASW. Once a communication center submitted the OCF-2 for a flight and the pilot accepted, an "OCC Number" would be issued to the communications center electronically as confirmation that the OCF-2 was received. The OCC's processing of the OCF-2 information was accomplished using the OH software. The OH software would query the OCF-2 for multiple data points including:

- Aircraft registration
- Metro Base Name and Metro Aviation Client Program Name
- Pilot name
- Date the OCF-2 was submitted by the communication center
- Time the flight is initiated
- Route of flight
- Estimated time enroute (ETE)

With this information, the software would once again access pilot training records and aircraft records to verify the pilot's qualifications, currency, medical certificate status, and the aircraft's airworthiness status. ETE information was analyzed by OH in relation to the pilot's reported start time of the assigned duty period to ensure the planned termination of the flight would not exceed the maximum allowed 14 hours of duty time. The estimated termination time of a flight was also monitored, and an alert would be displayed within the OCC if the flight had not ended within that time (aircraft overdue response).

The final data point analyzed by OH was the route of flight. The OH application recognized all FAA airport/heliport identifiers, Metro base identifiers, hospital identifiers, and 30 formats of GPS coordinates. Using this information, OH would query the NWS internet sites to obtain reported and forecast weather conditions along the route of flight indicated on the OCF-2. OH would display this information in a textual release summary. The operational control coordinator was responsible for reviewing the release summary. If the weather conditions were found to be out of compliance with the Operations Manual and Operations Specification requirements, the operational control coordinator would contact the pilot directly or by relay through the appropriate communication center.

Once a flight became airborne, the OCC would monitor the progress of the flight through a central display known as the Outerlink Console. This display would translate the various manufacturers' satellite tracking transponders and depict the aircraft's movement over a satellite view of the terrain. The Outerlink Console did not display weather information.

The OCF-2 was an editable form and was routinely accessed by either a communication center or the Metro Aviation OCC to update the route of flight, ETE, or to close the OCF-2 with "Time Terminated" information.

Occurrences in the OCC During and Around the Time of the Accident Flight

There were two Metro Aviation personnel on duty before and during the time of the accident at the OCC, a trainee operational control coordinator and a senior operational control coordinator. The trainee coordinator stated that when the accident flight request came into the OCC, the weather was reviewed using information from FAA-approved resources and through their Schneider Electric weather source.

The trainee coordinator stated that, on the night of the accident, he and the senior coordinator were using OH, which he referred to as the "old system" that he was not that familiar with. The trainee coordinator mentioned OH could crash while one was looking at it and flights could be airborne 15 minutes before a person was aware of it. In addition, the trainee coordinator mentioned that the coordinates for the location of the motor vehicle accident were correct, but that the format was not correct in OH. The trainee coordinator stated that the latitude and longitude format was a common problem with OH and that Metro Aviation OCC personnel had to reformat the latitude and longitude coordinates at times to get the coordinates to work in OH. The trainee coordinator mentioned that HCC would not have known of any formatting issues with Metro's OH software.

The trainee coordinator stated that he and the senior coordinator checked the weather the night of the accident, but nothing drew their attention to the weather.

Before the accident, it was common practice for communication centers, such as HCC, to fill out only the first segment or first few segments of the total flight route on the OCF-2 forms when sending that information into the OCC for review. When all the segments of flight were known, it was common practice to go back and complete or adjust the OCF-2 form in the official OCC Release Summary. This adjustment of the flight route occurred for the accident flight with the initial flight notification on the OCF-2 form from the HCC being at 2321 on March 25 and a current flight tracking record change done by the HCC at 2359 on March 25.

Review of the flight release revealed that the requested route of flight was Troy, Alabama, to the incorrectly-formatted latitude and longitude coordinates; it did not include the flight from the MVA site to the hospital. Since OH did not recognize the coordinates, the only weather information provided was for Troy Municipal Airport (TOI), about 5 miles from the helicopter's base. The TOI METAR about 42 minutes before the flight departed reported 10 miles visibility and a cloud ceiling of 6,500 ft. Although the TOI Terminal Aerodrome Forecast indicated that conditions would be deteriorating, the flight was predicted to return to base before that occurred. The route of flight was updated during the time the helicopter was on the ground at the MVA and would have provided further information about the conditions along the route, the OCC made no attempt to provide the updated weather information to the pilot. The trainee reviewed the release summary for the accident flight; the senior operational control coordinator provided no oversight of the review.

Following the accident, HCC noted that the format for the coordinates provided to Metro Aviation OCC for the accident flight was the same format that the HCC had been providing to the Metro Aviation OCC for the previous 2 years. Metro Aviation OCC did not have a procedure to ensure correct formatting of these coordinates.

Pilot Weather Briefing

The pilot's assessment of weather conditions at the start of his/her assigned duty period was communicated on the OCF-1 in a generalized color code. Green indicated no significant weather concerns; yellow indicated that commencing a flight may not be possible; and red indicated weather conditions prohibited flight operations. Metro Aviation provided internet-based, NWS-approved weather information to each of its bases of operation. This information would have been readily available to the accident pilot at the time of the flight request.

The accident pilot did not receive an official weather briefing from Lockheed Martin Flight Service (LMFS) or from Direct User Access Terminal Service (DUATS) and was not required to do so. The pilot did check the weather before the flight to the automobile accident scene, but it is unknown what weather information the pilot reviewed. The pilot completed an OCF-1 at the start of his shift around 1928 on March 25. At that time, the pilot assessed the weather conditions as "yellow." If the pilot had reviewed weather conditions after the 2321 notification time, the surface observations, TAFs, and AIRMET Sierra would have all indicated LIFR to IFR conditions near the MVA. There was no record of the accident pilot receiving or retrieving any additional weather information before the accident flight, or before and during the flight to the MVA.

Pilot and Flight Nurse Text Message Summaries

According to a nurse who was a friend of both the pilot and the flight nurse, they would text with each other routinely. Review of their text messages on the night of the accident indicated that the pilot was aware of the weather conditions before the flights. The following are excerpts from the text messages obtained from the nurse by the NTSB:

Text messages between the flight nurse and the friend:

- At 2328, the flight nurse advised her friend, "Got a flight." Her friend responded, "Have fun at that [motor vehicle accident] MVA."

- At 2336, the flight nurse advised her friend, "Lots of fog!!!" Her friend then responded, "You're in good hands."

- At 2337, the flight nurse responded to her friend and stated, "I know. But even he is like…Umm its pretty thick. Hahahaha." She then added, "He said we are good. 5 mins out."

- At 2340, the friend stated, "Sweet. Keep me posted."

- At 2343, the flight nurse advised that they were, "1.8 miles out." (This was the last text message sent by the flight nurse before the accident occurred.)

Text messages between the pilot and the friend:

- At 2354, the pilot advised the friend, "Shhhh this was more than work…Actually had to pull out some piloting skills."

- At 2356, the friend messaged the pilot stating, "That's what you got those mad piloting skills for my dear…to use them lol…was it bad?"

- At 2358, the pilot responded back to the friend advising that he would have to let the flight nurse tell her "but put it this way the other guys would have turned around."

- At 0000, the friend advised him, "She text me that there was lots of fog but that's all she said. I just responded to her she was in good hands…" The friend then asked, "Where did y'all go."

- At 0001, the pilot answered stating, "We are in enterprise..I'm sittin here still spinning watin..Gonna have to take to south it's the only place where weather is flyable."

- At 0002, the friend asked him, "How long will it take you to get to south?"

- At 0003, the pilot advised her, "Maybe 25-30 min." The friend then asked, "Is it gonna be one of those flights where you have to use those mad piloting skills again?

- At 0004, the pilot responded stating, "Yea to take off after that should be good."

- At 0005, the friend asked the pilot, "They still getting the patient loaded." He then responded, "Yea they still in the ambulance."

- At 0006, the friend stated, "At least they have the best pilot taking them there." The pilot responded that, "I wouldn't say all that…" (This was the last text message sent by the pilot before the accident occurred).

Get-There-Itis

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making, "pilots, particularly those with considerable experience, as a rule always try to complete a flight as planned, please passengers, meet schedules, and generally demonstrate that they have 'the right stuff.'."

One of the common behavioral traps identified was "Get-There-Itis." According to the AC, "common among pilots, [get-there-itis] clouds the vision and impairs judgment by causing a fixation on the original goal or destination combined with a total disregard for any alternative course of action."

Get-There-Itis is also known as hurry syndrome, plan continuation, or goal fixation.

Spatial Disorientation

The FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) contained guidance which stated that "under normal flight conditions, when there is a visual reference to the horizon and ground, the sensory system in the inner ear helps to identify the pitch, roll, and yaw movements of the airplane. When visual contact with the horizon is lost, the vestibular system becomes unreliable. Without visual references outside the airplane, there are many situations where combinations of normal motions and forces can create convincing illusions that are difficult to overcome." The Handbook also advised, "unless a pilot has many hours of training in instrument flight, flight in reduced visibility or at night when the horizon is not visible should be avoided."

According to the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3), "night flying is very different from day flying and demands more attention of the pilot. The most noticeable difference is the limited availability of outside visual references. Therefore, flight instruments should be used to a greater degree.… Generally, at night it is difficult to see clouds and restrictions to visibility, particularly on dark nights or under overcast. The pilot flying under VFR must exercise caution to avoid flying into clouds or a layer of fog." The handbook described some hazards associated with flying in airplanes under VFR when visual references, such as the ground or horizon, are obscured stating that "the vestibular sense (motion sensing by the inner ear) in particular tends to confuse the pilot. Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated; leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/28/2015
Flight Time: (Estimated) 5424 hours (Total, all aircraft), 90 hours (Total, this make and model), 5388 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Other Flight Crew Information

Certificate: None
Age: 38, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Other Flight Crew Information

Certificate: None
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: EUROCOPTER
Registration: N911GF
Model/Series: AS 350 B2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1998
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3119
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/12/2016, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4961 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 8923.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: Arriel/1D1
Registered Owner: HAYNES LIFE FLIGHT LLC
Rated Power: 641 hp
Operator: Metro Aviation Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: HDNA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: EDN, 360 ft msl
Observation Time: 0015 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 17°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 300 ft agl
Visibility:  3 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Mist; Drizzle; Fog
Departure Point: Goodman, AL (None)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Montgomery, AL (AL11)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0017 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Farm Field (None)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 283 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Rough; Vegetation; Wet
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 31.279444, -85.971111



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA140
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Enterprise, AL
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350 B2, registration: N911GF
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 26, 2016 about 0018 central daylight time, a Eurocopter AS 350 B2, N911GF, impacted trees and terrain near Enterprise, Alabama. The airline transport pilot, flight nurse, flight paramedic, and patient being transported, were fatally injured. The helicopter, registered to Haynes Life Flight LLC. and operated by Metro Aviation Inc. was substantially damaged. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135, as a helicopter emergency medical services flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan. The flight departed from a farm field near Goodman, Alabama about 0017, destined for Baptist Medical Center Heliport (AL11), Montgomery, Alabama.

According to the Coffee County Sherriff's Office, on March 25, 2016 at approximately 2309, a 911 called was received when a witness observed a motor vehicle accident on County Road 606 near Goodman, Alabama. Sheriff's deputies were dispatched along with Enterprise Rescue Squad. Deputies also contacted Haynes Life Flight dispatch, when it was discovered that the vehicle was overturned and that an unconscious victim was inside.

According to communications records, the call from the deputies was received by Haynes Life Flight Dispatch at 23:19:10. The pilot of "Life Flight 2," which was based at the Troy Regional Medical Center, Troy Alabama was notified at 23:20:38. The helicopter departed Troy at 23:26:57 and arrived at the landing zone (LZ) in a farm field adjacent to County Road 606 at 23:53:15.

According to witnesses, after touchdown, the pilot remained in the helicopter with the engine running. The flight paramedic and flight nurse exited the helicopter and entered the Enterprise Rescue Squad ambulance to help prepare the patient for transport. Once the patient was ready for transport, the flight nurse and flight paramedic along with several other emergency responders rolled the gurney approximately 70 yards through a grassy area to the helicopter and loaded the patient on-board. Once the patient had been loaded, the flight nurse and flight paramedic boarded, and at 00:16:45 the helicopter lifted off and turned north towards AL11.

Fog, mist, and reduced visibility existed at the LZ at the time of the helicopter's arrival. Witnesses also observed that these same conditions were still present when the helicopter lifted off approximately 23 minutes later. The helicopter climbed vertically into cloud layer that was approximately 150 feet above ground level and disappeared when it turned left in a northbound direction toward AL11. Review of the recorded weather at Enterprise Municipal Airport (EDN), Enterprise, Alabama, located 4 nautical miles east of the accident site, at 0015, included winds from 120 degrees at 4 knots, 3 statute miles visibility in drizzle, overcast clouds at 3oo feet, temperature 17 degrees C, dew point 17 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

According to Haynes Life Flight, the on-board Skyconnect satellite tracking system provided position updates for the helicopter every 3 minutes. Additionally, the pilot was supposed to contact them every 15 minutes via radio. After the helicopter departed on the accident flight, Haynes Life Flight did not receive the pilot's normal 15-minute check-in, and when they checked the satellite tracking system, it showed that the helicopter was still at the LZ, though they knew it had lifted off. Haynes Life Flight then began to notify authorities that the helicopter was missing. After an extensive search by authorities, at approximately 0700, and around the area of County Road 615 and 616, search parties began to smell what they believed was jet fuel. The helicopter was eventually located the wreckage in a swampy, heavily wooded area.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the United States Army from the approach control radar site at Cairns Army Airfield (OZR), Fort Rucker, Alabama, located 13 nautical miles east of the accident site, indicated that after takeoff the helicopter had entered a left turn, and climbed to 1,000 feet above mean sea level. At 00:18:04, the rate of turn began to increase. At 00:18:18 the rate of turn continued to increase and the helicopter reached a peak altitude of 1,100 feet. It remained at this altitude until approximately 00:18:28 when the helicopter began a rapid descent. Five seconds later, that helicopter had descended through 600 feet. Moments later, radar contact was lost when the helicopter descended below the floor of the radar coverage area.

Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the helicopter had struck trees approximately a 1/2-mile north of where it had departed. A debris path that passed through the trees prior to where the helicopter came to rest and ran from south to north, exhibited an approximate 45-degree descent angle through the trees. The wreckage was heavily fragmented with only the aft fuselage being generally recognizable. The fuel tank was broken open, and the smell of jet fuel was present. The engine and transmission were separated from their mounts, and the helicopter had struck a large tree prior to coming to rest. A crater approximately 10 by 20 feet wide was present prior to a large tree the wreckage came to rest next to, and other trees (approximately 80 to 100 feet tall) along the energy path, exhibited impact damage and evidence of blade strikes.

Evidence of power was visible on the main rotor blades (MRBs) and the blue and red MRBs were broken in mutual locations. The transmission and engine were also separated from the fuselage.

The tail boom displayed a right horizontal bend mid-span but the right horizontal stabilizer and the tail rotor had remained attached to the tail boom, with both tail rotor blades exhibiting minimal damage. Control continuity and rotation were confirmed from the tailrotor to the aft bulkhead. The left side horizontal stabilizer was separated from its mounting location. The tail rotor pedals were separated from their mounting locations; however, continuity throughout the tail rotor flex ball cable was confirmed.

Continuity was also confirmed through the transmission and the top mounts of the left lateral and fore-aft main rotor hydraulic servos indicated that they had separated from the transmission due to overload forces. No abnormalities with hydraulic servo integrity were noted, and all push pull tubes and mixing units actuators were observed to be broken with overload signatures.

Examination of the engine revealed that it had separated from the helicopter during the impact sequence. Externally the engine displayed impact damage. Examination of the free turbine revealed that it had not shed its blades. The Fuel Control Unit (FCU) was separated from the accessory gearbox but both FCU shafts were present and not broken, and the FCU remained attached by the fuel and air lines. The P2 line was still attached on both the intermediate case and the FCU. The axial compressor had foreign object damage (FOD), on all 13 blades, and curling opposite the direction of rotation was observed on several. Both Module 1 and Module 5 magnetic plugs were clean. Both electric chip detectors (main and TU208 rear bearing) were clean. Module 5 was removed and the input pinion slippage mark was found displaced in the over-torqued direction approximately 2-2 1/2 mm, consistent with power at the time of main rotor strike. The freewheel shaft was checked and proper operation confirmed. Continuity to the N2 drive of the FCU was confirmed. The gas generator and free turbine could not be turned by hand. The oil, air, and fuel lines were remained connected to engine and properly saftied. The electrical connection cannon plugs were still connected to the engine deck, but the harnesses had broken during the impact sequence. The rear engine mount was still connected to the linking tube but both rubber mounts were separated from the engine deck. The front support was broken at the connection to the aircraft liaison tube. The transmission shaft was found inside the liaison tube but neither side flector groups nor bolts were connected to it. The flector group on the engine side was still connected to the flanged adapter and on the freewheel shaft. The 3 bolts to the transmission shaft had been broken and the holes were found elongated opposite the direction of rotation consistent with power being produced at rotor strike.

The accident helicopter was manufactured in 1998. It was equipped with a three-blade main rotor system, a two-blade tail rotor system, and was powered by a Turbomeca Arriel 1D1 engine rated at 641 shaft horsepower. The helicopter was equipped with skid-type landing gear, Night vision goggles (NVG) and NVG-compatible lighting, a helicopter terrain avoidance warning system, and an autopilot. The helicopter was not certificated for flight in IMC conditions.

According to the operator, the helicopter was maintained under a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved aircraft inspection program. The helicopter's most recent inspection was completed on February 12, 2016. At the time of the accident, the helicopter had accrued 8,923.2 total hours of operation.

According to FAA records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for helicopter and type ratings for the AB-139 and AW-139. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter. According to the operator, he had been employed by them for approximately 6 months and had 90 hours of flight experience in the accident helicopter make and model since he was hired. His total flight experience was 5,301 hours, 5,265 of which was as pilot in command, 474 hours of which was at night, and 265 of which were in actual instrument meteorological conditions. His flight experience during the 90 days prior to the accident was 47 hours, including 20 hours in the 30 days prior to the accident.

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination. The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; FAA / AVP-100; Washington, District of Columbia
Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses (BEA); Le Bourget, France
Metro Aviation Inc.; Shreveport, Louisiana 
Haynes Life Flight LLC.; Montgomery, Alabama 
Airbus Helicopters Inc.; Grand Prairie, Texas
Turbomeca USA; Grand Prairie, Texas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N911GF

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Enterprise, AL
Accident Number: ERA16FA140
Date & Time: 03/26/2016, 0018 CDT
Registration: N911GF
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350 B2
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 26, 2016, about 0018 central daylight time, a Eurocopter AS350 B2, N911GF, impacted trees and terrain near Enterprise, Alabama. The airline transport pilot, flight nurse, flight paramedic, and patient being transported were fatally injured. The helicopter, which was registered to Haynes Life Flight LLC and operated by Metro Aviation, Inc., was substantially damaged. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as a helicopter air ambulance flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan. The flight departed from a farm field near Goodman, Alabama, about 0017, and was destined for Baptist Medical Center Heliport (AL11), Montgomery, Alabama.

According to the Coffee County Sheriff's Office, on March 25, 2016, about 2309, sheriff's deputies and the Enterprise Rescue Squad were dispatched to a motor vehicle accident (MVA) near Goodman, Alabama. A sheriff's deputy contacted Haynes Ambulance Communication Center (HCC) by cellular phone when he learned that the motor vehicle was overturned and that an unconscious victim was inside.

According to communications records, HCC received the call from the deputy at 2319:10. The pilot of the helicopter, was notified at 2320:38. The helicopter, which was known as "Life Flight 2" and was based at the Troy Regional Medical Center, Troy, Alabama, departed Troy at 2326:57 and arrived at the landing zone (LZ) in a farm field adjacent to the MVA site at 2353:15.

Witnesses stated that, after touchdown, the pilot remained in the helicopter with the engine running. The flight paramedic and flight nurse exited the helicopter and entered the Enterprise Rescue Squad ambulance to help prepare the patient for transport.

Once the patient was ready for transport, the flight nurse, flight paramedic, and several other emergency responders rolled the gurney about 70 yards through a grassy area to the helicopter and loaded the patient on-board. One of the first responders later reported that he noticed that the pilot had something over his eyes "like sunglasses, but it was square looking." Once the patient had been loaded, the flight nurse and flight paramedic also boarded, and, at 0016:45, the helicopter lifted off and turned north toward AL11.

Review of radar data provided by the United States Army from the approach control radar site at Cairns Army Airfield (OZR), Fort Rucker, Alabama, located about 13 nautical miles east of the accident site, indicated that, the helicopter was first identified on radar after takeoff at 0017:35. The helicopter was in a shallow left turn and climbing to 1,000 ft above mean sea level. At 0018:04, the rate of turn began to increase and continued to increase over the next 4 seconds when the helicopter reached a peak altitude of 1,100 ft. The helicopter remained at this altitude and continued the left turn until 0018:28 when the helicopter began a rapid descent. Five seconds later, radar indicated that helicopter had descended through 600 ft. Moments later, the helicopter descended below the floor of the radar coverage area, and radar contact was lost. According to the radar data, the flight lasted about 1 minute.

According to HCC, the helicopter's on-board Skyconnect satellite tracking system updated every 3 minutes, and the pilot was supposed to contact them every 15 minutes. However, after the helicopter lifted off, HCC did not receive the pilot's normal 15-minute check-in, and, when they checked the satellite tracking system, it showed that it had not updated and that the helicopter was still at the LZ. HCC then began to notify authorities that they believed that the helicopter was down somewhere. About 0700, after an extensive search, search parties began to smell what they believed was jet fuel and eventually located the wreckage in a swampy, heavily wooded area.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Metro Aviation, and pilot records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a helicopter rating and type ratings for the Agusta Westland AB-139 and AW-139. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter.

The pilot was hired as a flight instructor in June 2009 by Helicopters of America. He then became their lead flight instructor and worked for them until September 2009 when the company ceased operation. He was then hired by Cloud 9 Helicopters, where he became senior flight instructor.

On April 14, 2011, he was hired by Petroleum Helicopters International (PHI). When hired by PHI, he had accrued 2,448 total hours of helicopter flight experience and had flown the R22, R44, H269, AS355, MD500, MD600, and A109.

At PHI, he flew the AW139 as both a first officer (co-pilot) and a captain (pilot) in both visual flight rules (VFR) and instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. During his tenure at PHI, he accrued an additional 1,889.63 flight hours supporting oil and gas contracts until he left their employment on November 16, 2015.

At the time of the accident, the pilot had been employed by Metro Aviation for about 6 months and had accumulated 90 hours of flight experience in the accident helicopter make and model since he was hired. His total flight experience was 5,301 hours of which 5,265 hours were as pilot in command, 474 hours were at night, and 265 hours were in actual instrument conditions. His flight experience during the 90 days before the accident was 47 hours, including 20 hours in the 30 days before the accident.

Review of Metro Aviation/PHI training records indicated that he had received training in human factors and decision-making, night operations, night vision goggles (NVGs), and inadvertent entry into IMC. He did not meet currency requirements for flight in IMC at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was manufactured in 1998. It was equipped with a three-blade main rotor system and a two-blade tail rotor system and was powered by a Turbomeca Arriel 1D1 engine rated at 641 shaft horsepower. The helicopter was equipped with skid-type landing gear, a night vision imaging system (NVIS), which consisted of NVGs and NVG-compatible lighting, a helicopter terrain avoidance warning system (HTAWS), and an autopilot. The helicopter was not certificated for flight in IMC.

According to Metro Aviation, the helicopter was maintained under an FAA-approved aircraft inspection program. The helicopter's most recent inspection was completed on February 12, 2016. At the time of the accident, the helicopter had accrued 8,923.2 total hours of operation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Videos, Photographs, and Witness Information

Witness statements indicated that fog, mist, and reduced visibility existed at the MVA site at the time of the helicopter's arrival. Witness statements, photographs, and videos also indicated that these conditions were still present when the helicopter lifted off about 23 minutes later.

Review of witness videos and photographs of the accident flight revealed that, during the takeoff sequence, very light to light precipitation was falling in the field surrounding the helicopter. The precipitation was also visible in the helicopter's landing light beams directed forward from the helicopter.

According to one witness, there was slight drizzle around the time of the takeoff, and, although there was no ground fog, there may have been fog above the trees. Another witness stated that there was a heavy mist, and the ceiling was "very low, maybe 100 foot." This witness also stated he could see the tops of the trees, and, by shining his flashlight up, he could easily tell that the fog started about two to three times as high as the nearest tree. Another witness stated that, at the time of the helicopter's departure, the fog was mixed with rain and was "kind of pretty thick." This witness also mentioned that the helicopter flew over the road, which was not far from the LZ, and the witness lost visual contact with the helicopter due to the fog.

Surface Analysis Chart

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 0100 depicted a stationary front that stretched from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico north-northeastward into southeastern Alabama and northeastward into western South Carolina. A low-pressure center was located in eastern Alabama. The station models around the accident site depicted air temperatures in the low to mid 60's degrees Fahrenheit (°F), with temperature-dew point spreads of 1°F or less, a southeast to east wind below 10 knots, cloudy skies, and fog. Areas near frontal boundaries with low temperature-dewpoint spreads at the surface are typically locations conducive to the formation of low clouds and fog, and, if enough moisture is available, precipitation can also be present.

Surface Observations

Enterprise Municipal Airport (EDN), located 4 miles east-northeast of the accident site, was the closest official weather station to the accident site and had an Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS). EDN weather at 0015 was reported as wind from 120° at 4 knots, 3 miles visibility, drizzle, an overcast ceiling at 300 ft above ground level (agl), temperature of 17°C, dew point temperature of 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. EDN weather at 0035 was reported as wind from 120° at 4 knots, 3 miles visibility, drizzle, an overcast ceiling at 300 ft agl, temperature of 17°C, dew point temperature of 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

Observations from other stations near the accident site also indicated low instrument flight rules (LIFR) conditions due to ceilings below 500 ft agl at the accident time.

Satellite Data

Visible and infrared images obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 13 indicated abundant cloud cover over the accident site at the time of the accident. The cloud tops near the accident site were moving from southwest to northeast. Based on the brightness temperatures above the accident site and the vertical temperature profile, the cloud-top heights over the accident site were about 16,000 ft at 0115.

Radar Imagery Information

The closest NWS Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) was located 28 nautical miles east-northeast of the accident site at an elevation of 434 ft, at Fort Rucker, Alabama. The WSR-88D base reflectivity images indicated very light precipitation between AL11 and the automobile accident site before 2320 on March 25. The very light to light precipitation continued to form, increase in area coverage, and move over the automobile accident site while the helicopter was en route and while the helicopter was on the ground loading the patient. The accident flight likely took off in drizzle or light rain conditions, and these precipitation conditions persisted through the accident time.

Airmen's Meteorological Information

Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMET) Sierra for IFR conditions due to mist was issued at 2145 on March 25 and was valid at the accident time. There was another AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions due to mist and precipitation that was also valid just east of the accident site for portions of Georgia and northwestern Florida. These AIRMETs were valid at the time flight notification at 2321 on March 25 all the way through the accident flight time.

Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAFs)

OZR and Dothan Regional Airport (DHN), Dothan, Alabama, located XX miles and XX miles from the accident site, respectively, both had TAFs that forecast IFR or LIFR conditions at the accident time, and both OZR and DHN TAFs were issued well before the time the pilot was notified of the mission.
National Weather Service Discussion

The National Weather Service Office in Tallahassee, Florida, issued an Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) at 1929 on March 25 for the area surrounding the accident site. The aviation section of the AFD mentioned that IFR conditions would be present at all airports overnight with improving conditions by the daytime on March 26.

Astronomical Data

Moonrise occurred at 2103 on March 25. The phase of the moon was waning gibbous with 91% of the moon's visible disk illuminated. .

For further details concerning meteorological information, refer to the Meteorology Report in the public docket for this accident investigation.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Accident Site Examination

Examination of the accident site revealed that the helicopter had struck trees about 1/2 mile north of the motor vehicle accident site. A debris path ran from south to north at a downward angle of about 45° through the trees and led to the helicopter.

Airframe and Rotor System Examination

The wreckage was heavily fragmented with only the aft fuselage being easily recognizable. The fuel tank was broken open, and the smell of jet fuel was present. The engine and transmission were separated from their mounts. The main wreckage was resting at the base of a large tree, and other 80-ft- to 100-ft-tall trees along the debris path exhibited impact damage and evidence of blade strikes. Examination of the main rotor blades (MRBs) indicated that the main rotor was under power during the accident sequence, and the blue and red MRBs were broken in mutual locations.

The tail boom displayed a right horizontal bend mid-span; the right horizontal stabilizer and the tail rotor remained attached to the tail boom. Control continuity and rotation were confirmed from the tailrotor to the aft bulkhead. The left horizontal stabilizer was separated from its mounting location. The tail rotor pedals were separated from their mounting locations. Tail rotor pedal control continuity through the tail rotor flex ball cable was confirmed.

Continuity was confirmed through the transmission, and all three main rotor actuators (left roll, right roll, and pitch) and the tail rotor actuator were identified along with their associated hardware. No abnormalities with hydraulic servo integrity were noted, and all push-pull tubes and mixing unit actuators were broken and exhibited signatures consistent with overload signatures.

Main Rotor Actuators Examination

The left roll actuator remained attached to the stationary star by its rod-end bearing, and the other two main rotor actuators were detached and torn from the stationary star and rod-end bearings. The right roll actuator adaptor casing showed an approximately 2.5-inch break from the threaded attachment fitting to the stationary star. All main rotor actuator servo input rods remained attached to the rotor mast casing and could be moved by hand in and out of each adaptor casing. All three servo input rods showed evidence of bending. All three main rotor accumulators were intact with the right roll and left roll accumulators showing slight dents on their outer surfaces. Pressure from each of the main rotor accumulators was released via its Schrader valve. At least 120 psi of pressure was released from each accumulator, indicating the accumulators were normally charged.

Tail Rotor Actuator Examination

The tail rotor actuator unit was still attached to the airframe, the servo accumulator, and the load compensator. The hydraulic input and return lines exhibited evidence of hydraulic fluid being present. The tail rotor accumulator was intact and released 50 psi of pressure via its Schrader valve, indicating the accumulator was normally charged.

Attitude Indicator and Directional Gyro Examination

The attitude indicator was disassembled and examined. The gyro showed rotational scoring on the inner and outer housings consistent with rotation at the time of impact. The directional gyro was also disassembled and examined. The gyro showed scoring on the inner and outer housings consistent with rotation at the time of impact.

Fuel Filters Examination

The helicopter was fitted with a standard engine fuel filter attached to the fuel control unit and an aftermarket airframe fuel filtering system. Both fuel filter housing units were clean and free of debris. Both filters also appeared to be clean and unobstructed.

Engine Examination

The engine displayed external impact damage. The free turbine blades remained intact. The fuel control unit (FCU) was separated from the accessory gearbox; both FCU shafts were present and intact; the FCU remained attached by the fuel and air lines. The P2 line was still attached to both the intermediate case and the FCU.

The axial compressor had foreign object damage on all 13 blades and curling opposite the direction of rotation was observed on several blades. Both the Module 1 and the Module 5 magnetic plugs were clean. Both electric chip detectors (main and TU208 rear bearing) were clean. Module 5 was removed, and the input pinion slippage mark was found displaced in the over-torqued direction about 2 to 2.5 millimeters, a measurement consistent with engine power being produced at the time of main rotor strike.

The freewheel shaft was checked, and proper operation confirmed. Continuity to the N2 drive of the FCU was confirmed. The gas generator could not be turned by hand, and the free turbine could not be turned by hand.

The oil, air, and fuel lines were found connected to engine and properly secured. The electrical connection cannon plugs were still connected to the engine deck; the harnesses had been broken during the impact sequence. The rear engine mount was still connected to the linking tube, but both rubber mounts were separated from the engine deck. The front support was broken at the connection to the aircraft liaison tube.

The transmission shaft was found inside the liaison tube but neither side flector groups, nor bolts were connected to it. The flector group on the engine side was still connected to the flanged adapter, and on the freewheel shaft. The 3 bolts from the main gearbox input, to the transmission shaft had been broken, and the holes were found elongated opposite the direction of rotation consistent with power being produced at the time of main rotor strike.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, Montgomery, Alabama, performed postmortem examinations on all three crew members and the patient. The cause of death for all four occupants was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of the pilot. The specimens from the pilot were negative for all tested drugs. Testing for ethanol, carbon monoxide and cyanide was not performed.

ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION

Metro Aviation

Metro Aviation was incorporated in 1982 as a helicopter charter, flight training, and maintenance operation. They entered the air medical service business in November 1983. At the time of the accident, Metro Aviation operated more than 130 aircraft out of 98 bases for more than 30 programs in 18 states across the country. Metro Aviation's operations division provided pilots and maintenance technicians for the aircraft in their various programs.

Haynes Ambulance

Haynes Ambulance was started in 1969 in Wetumpka, Alabama. In 1977, Haynes Ambulance of Alabama, Inc., was established in Montgomery Alabama. Haynes Life Flight LLC began operations in June 2014. At the time of the accident, Haynes Ambulance/Life Flight's operations covered three counties in Central Alabama (Elmore, Montgomery, and Pike) as well as Maxwell Air Force Base. Additionally, they had a variety of mutual aid agreements with various surrounding cities, counties, municipal, and private agencies.

Haynes Ambulance/Life Flight covered an area of about 1,420 square miles from 9 strategically located stations throughout their service area. About 180 full-time and part-time emergency medical technicians (EMT) and paramedics cared for emergency and convalescent patients, serving a population of over 500,000 citizens with over 35 ground ambulances and 2 helicopters.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Aeronautical Decision-making

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making, "pilots, particularly those with considerable experience, as a rule always try to complete a flight as planned, please passengers, meet schedules, and generally demonstrate that they have 'the right stuff'." One of the common behavioral traps identified was "Get-There-Itis." According to the AC, "common among pilots, [get-there-itis] clouds the vision and impairs judgment by causing a fixation on the original goal or destination combined with a total disregard for any alternative course of action." Get-There-Itis is also known as hurry syndrome, plan continuation, or goal fixation.

Metro Aviation Operations Manual

According to Metro Aviation's Operations Manual, the pilot-in-command of an aircraft had the final authority and responsibility for decisions relating to safety of flight and was required to select the most conservative course of action if a conflict arose concerning a Metro Aviation policy, procedure, or regulation. Operational control coordinators and operational control supervisors were responsible for confirming whether a flight or series of flights could be initiated, conducted, or terminated safely, in accordance with the authorizations, limitations, and procedures in the Metro Aviation Operations Manual and the applicable regulations. They were also "authorized to terminate a flight for any reason that may be contrary to [Federal aviation regulations] FARs or policy."

Weather minimums were also published in the operations manual for all VFR operations. Review of the weather minimums indicated that:

- When flying at night using an approved NVIS or HTAWS in non-mountainous, local flying areas, an 800-ft ceiling with a flight visibility of 3 statute miles was required.

- When flying at night using an approved NVIS or HTAWS in non-mountainous, non-local, flying areas, a 1,000-ft ceiling with a flight visibility of 3 statute miles was required.

Guidance for use of NVIS stated, "at no time shall NVGs be utilized to continue flight into weather below the minimums."

Guidance for inadvertent IMC or loss of visual surface reference stated:

"Inadvertent IMC does not only mean situations where an aircraft enters clouds, but also entering areas of reduced visibility, darkness with no ground lighting, and/or lowering ceiling resulting in the loss of visual ground reference. Pilots are expected to avoid inadvertent IMC and the loss of visual surface reference by maintaining situational awareness of weather changes and environmental conditions.

Pilots should be prepared for the possibility of inadvertent IMC or loss of visual surface reference. All company aircraft will carry current instrument approach charts and low altitude enroute maps for the area where the aircraft is assigned or expected to be flown. These charts and maps are to be used in the event that the aircraft enters into "inadvertent IMC" or "loss of visual reference". …

A minimum safe altitude [MSA] chart for each base local area will be carried on each base aircraft for quick reference by the pilot. ….

Minimum safe altitudes outside the local area will be 1000 feet above the maximum elevation figure as depicted on the VFR Sectional Chart for the aircraft location or the minimum off route obstruction clearance altitude as depicted on IFR Low En route chart. Inadvertent IMC is an emergency situation which requires maximum pilot attention. Good crew resource management is essential to safely deal with the emergency and make a successful recovery. Pilots will brief their medical crew members on their roles and responsibilities in the event of an inadvertent IMC prior to flight in marginal VFR conditions or en route if marginal VFR conditions are encountered."

The Operations Manual further advised that:

"In case of inadvertent IMC or Loss of visual surface reference the following procedure will be followed:

A. Maintain positive control of the aircraft with reference to instruments

1) Attitude – Level
2) Heading – Turn only to avoid known obstacles
3) Power – Adjust to climb power
4) Airspeed – Adjust to climb airspeed
5) Make turns no greater than standard rate

B. Climb to the minimum safe altitude (MSA) to clear all obstacles in the area.

C. Communicate

1) Declare an emergency to ATC
a. Squawk 7700
b. Report:
i. last known position,
ii. heading, altitude,
iii. fuel remaining, and
iv. souls on board

2) State nature of emergency (inadvertent IMC), intentions, and request for assistance
a. Weather: Determine if VFR conditions can be reached with ATC assistance.
b. Obstacles: Remain at or above a minimum safe altitude.
c. ATC can provide frequencies, vectors, courses, and altitude for airways and approaches.
d. If no assistance is available in the aircraft, use ATC for as much help as you need.
e. Complete the approach procedure to a landing or entering VMC conditions.
f. Maintain VMC and land."

Metro Aviation's Operational Control Center

According to Metro Aviation's Operations Manual, operational control is a two-tier system. The first tier involves the placement of an airworthy aircraft listed in the company's operations specifications and a current and qualified crew.

The second tier is determining whether a flight or series of flights can be initiated, conducted, or terminated safely and in accordance with all policies, procedures, general operations manual and regulations.

To accomplish operational control, Metro Aviation's Operational Control Center (OCC) was staffed 24 hours a day by operational control coordinators. The OCC continually monitored flight operations, weather trends, aircraft status, and any change that could affect the ability of the pilot to initiate, conduct, or terminate a flight or series of flights in accordance with the Metro Aviation Operations Manual, Operations Specifications, or Metro Operations Memos.

At the time of the accident, the OCC used two software systems to comply with Operations Specification A008-Operational Control (14 CFR 135.77- Responsibility for Operational Control and 14 CFR 135.79 Flight Locating Requirements). The first software system was the Metro Aviation Secure Website (MASW), acted as a central collection and processing point for operational information. Users logged into the system with a unique username and password and interacted within the system in accordance with the permissions granted by the company administrator. The MASW was routinely relied upon by Metro Aviation pilots, operational control coordinators, mechanics, aircraft records employees, pilot records employees, and partner communication centers/communication specialists.

The second software system was the OCC Helper (OH), which was developed by Metro Aviation to perform key compliance tasks and to monitor company flight operations. The primary logic of this application was focused on routine queries of company databases (pilot records, aircraft status reports, etc.), as well as outside resources such as NWS reports and forecasts. Operational control center coordinators were the only Metro Aviation employees trained and allowed access to OH.

Determination of pilot qualifications and aircraft status at the various bases was accomplished by the OCC using Operational Control Form 1 (OCF-1).

Metro Aviation required that, before commencing any flight operation, and after a pilot had logged-in for his/her assigned duty period and completed the pre-flight inspection of the aircraft assigned, the pilot was to complete the OCF-1 electronically using the MASW. Upon receiving the OCF-1 at the OCC, the OH software would query the Metro Aviation Pilot Records Database and display a summary view of the pilot's aircraft qualifications, currency, and medical certificate status. Additionally, the OH software would query the Metro Aviation Aircraft Records Database and provide a summary view of the aircraft's maintenance status. After reviewing these records and determining that they were appropriate, the operational control coordinator would electronically attest that the OCF-1 had been reviewed.

The OCF-1 was an editable form that pilots would routinely update throughout their assigned duty periods to report changes in weather, static risk, or aircraft maintenance status. Once the pilot completed an edit, the OCC would be prompted to perform an updated review of the form.

Flight locating requirements were addressed by the OCC using Operational Control Form 2 (OCF-2). The OCF-2 was the primary oversight for a specific Part 135 flight or series of flights. To achieve this oversight, Metro Aviation partnered with multiple communication centers throughout the country. Each communication center was associated with a specific Metro Aviation client's program. Some programs were just one base and one aircraft; others were several bases and several aircraft all associated with the same Metro Aviation client.

Communication center employees were not Metro Aviation employees; however, all the communication center employees were trained by Metro Aviation. This training was recognized in the approved Metro Aviation Training Manual and was conducted both initially and then annually for currency requirements.

The communications center's primary role in Metro Aviation flight operations was communicating flight requests to the Metro Aviation pilots and the Metro Aviation OCC. In the example of a car accident response, the first responder on scene (ambulance, fire dept., etc.) would make the initial request for the aircraft to the communication center, who would then notify the Metro Aviation pilot. The Metro Aviation pilot would then analyze the request in accordance with the Metro Aviation Operations Manual, Metro Aviation Training Program, Operations Specifications, and Federal Aviation Regulations and either accept or decline the flight. Whether accepted or declined by the pilot, the communication center would submit the OCF-2 to the OCC.

The OCF-2 was an electronic form accessed through the MASW. Once a communication center submitted the OCF-2 for a flight and the pilot accepted, an "OCC Number" would be issued to the communications center electronically as confirmation that the OCF-2 was received. The OCC's processing of the OCF-2 information was accomplished using the OH software. The OH software would query the OCF-2 for multiple data points including:

- Aircraft registration
- Metro Base Name and Metro Aviation Client Program Name
- Pilot name
- Date the OCF-2 was submitted by the communication center
- Time the flight is initiated
- Route of flight
- Estimated time enroute (ETE)

With this information, the software would once again access pilot training records and aircraft records to verify the pilot's qualifications, currency, medical certificate status, and the aircraft's airworthiness status. ETE information was analyzed by OH in relation to the pilot's reported start time of the assigned duty period to ensure the planned termination of the flight would not exceed the maximum allowed 14 hours of duty time. The estimated termination time of a flight was also monitored, and an alert would be displayed within the OCC if the flight had not ended within that time (aircraft overdue response).

The final data point analyzed by OH was the route of flight. The OH application recognized all FAA airport/heliport identifiers, Metro base identifiers, hospital identifiers, and 30 formats of GPS coordinates. Using this information, OH would query the NWS internet sites to obtain reported and forecast weather conditions along the route of flight indicated on the OCF-2. OH would display this information in a textual release summary. The operational control coordinator was responsible for reviewing the release summary. If the weather conditions were found to be out of compliance with the Operations Manual and Operations Specification requirements, the operational control coordinator would contact the pilot directly or by relay through the appropriate communication center.

Once a flight became airborne, the OCC would monitor the progress of the flight through a central display known as the Outerlink Console. This display would translate the various manufacturers' satellite tracking transponders and depict the aircraft's movement over a satellite view of the terrain. The Outerlink Console did not display weather information.

The OCF-2 was an editable form and was routinely accessed by either a communication center or the Metro Aviation OCC to update the route of flight, ETE, or to close the OCF-2 with "Time Terminated" information.

Occurrences in the OCC During and Around the Time of the Accident Flight

There were two Metro Aviation personnel on duty before and during the time of the accident at the OCC, a trainee operational control coordinator and a senior operational control coordinator. The trainee coordinator stated that when the accident flight request came into the OCC, the weather was reviewed using information from FAA-approved resources and through their Schneider Electric weather source.

The trainee coordinator stated that, on the night of the accident, he and the senior coordinator were using OH, which he referred to as the "old system" that he was not that familiar with. The trainee coordinator mentioned OH could crash while one was looking at it and flights could be airborne 15 minutes before a person was aware of it. In addition, the trainee coordinator mentioned that the coordinates for the location of the motor vehicle accident were correct, but that the format was not correct in OH. The trainee coordinator stated that the latitude and longitude format was a common problem with OH and that Metro Aviation OCC personnel had to reformat the latitude and longitude coordinates at times to get the coordinates to work in OH. The trainee coordinator mentioned that HCC would not have known of any formatting issues with Metro's OH software.

The trainee coordinator stated that he and the senior coordinator checked the weather the night of the accident, but nothing drew their attention to the weather.

Before the accident, it was common practice for communication centers, such as HCC, to fill out only the first segment or first few segments of the total flight route on the OCF-2 forms when sending that information into the OCC for review. When all the segments of flight were known, it was common practice to go back and complete or adjust the OCF-2 form in the official OCC Release Summary. This adjustment of the flight route occurred for the accident flight with the initial flight notification on the OCF-2 form from the HCC being at 2321 on March 25 and a current flight tracking record change done by the HCC at 2359 on March 25.

Review of the flight release revealed that the requested route of flight was Troy, Alabama, to the incorrectly-formatted latitude and longitude coordinates; it did not include the flight from the MVA site to the hospital. Since OH did not recognize the coordinates, the only weather information provided was for Troy Municipal Airport (TOI), about 5 miles from the helicopter's base. The TOI METAR about 42 minutes before the flight departed reported 10 miles visibility and a cloud ceiling of 6,500 ft. Although the TOI Terminal Aerodrome Forecast indicated that conditions would be deteriorating, the flight was predicted to return to base before that occurred. The route of flight was updated during the time the helicopter was on the ground at the MVA and would have provided further information about the conditions along the route, the OCC made no attempt to provide the updated weather information to the pilot. The trainee reviewed the release summary for the accident flight; the senior operational control coordinator provided no oversight of the review.

Following the accident, HCC noted that the format for the coordinates provided to Metro Aviation OCC for the accident flight was the same format that the HCC had been providing to the Metro Aviation OCC for the previous 2 years. Metro Aviation OCC did not have a procedure to ensure correct formatting of these coordinates.

Pilot Weather Briefing

The pilot's assessment of weather conditions at the start of his/her assigned duty period was communicated on the OCF-1 in a generalized color code. Green indicated no significant weather concerns; yellow indicated that commencing a flight may not be possible; and red indicated weather conditions prohibited flight operations. Metro Aviation provided internet-based, NWS-approved weather information to each of its bases of operation. This information would have been readily available to the accident pilot at the time of the flight request.

The accident pilot did not receive an official weather briefing from Lockheed Martin Flight Service (LMFS) or from Direct User Access Terminal Service (DUATS) and was not required to do so. The pilot did check the weather before the flight to the automobile accident scene, but it is unknown what weather information the pilot reviewed. The pilot completed an OCF-1 at the start of his shift around 1928 on March 25. At that time, the pilot assessed the weather conditions as "yellow." If the pilot had reviewed weather conditions after the 2321 notification time, the surface observations, TAFs, and AIRMET Sierra would have all indicated LIFR to IFR conditions near the MVA. There was no record of the accident pilot receiving or retrieving any additional weather information before the accident flight, or before and during the flight to the MVA.

Pilot and Flight Nurse Text Message Summaries

According to a nurse who was a friend of both the pilot and the flight nurse, they would text with each other routinely. Review of their text messages on the night of the accident indicated that the pilot was aware of the weather conditions before the flights. The following are excerpts from the text messages obtained from the nurse by the NTSB:

Text messages between the flight nurse and the friend:

- At 2328, the flight nurse advised her friend, "Got a flight." Her friend responded, "Have fun at that [motor vehicle accident] MVA."

- At 2336, the flight nurse advised her friend, "Lots of fog!!!" Her friend then responded, "You're in good hands."

- At 2337, the flight nurse responded to her friend and stated, "I know. But even he is like…Umm its pretty thick. Hahahaha." She then added, "He said we are good. 5 mins out."

- At 2340, the friend stated, "Sweet. Keep me posted."

- At 2343, the flight nurse advised that they were, "1.8 miles out." (This was the last text message sent by the flight nurse before the accident occurred.)

Text messages between the pilot and the friend:

- At 2354, the pilot advised the friend, "Shhhh this was more than work…Actually had to pull out some piloting skills."

- At 2356, the friend messaged the pilot stating, "That's what you got those mad piloting skills for my dear…to use them lol…was it bad?"

- At 2358, the pilot responded back to the friend advising that he would have to let the flight nurse tell her "but put it this way the other guys would have turned around."

- At 0000, the friend advised him, "She text me that there was lots of fog but that's all she said. I just responded to her she was in good hands…" The friend then asked, "Where did y'all go."

- At 0001, the pilot answered stating, "We are in enterprise..I'm sittin here still spinning watin..Gonna have to take to south it's the only place where weather is flyable."

- At 0002, the friend asked him, "How long will it take you to get to south?"

- At 0003, the pilot advised her, "Maybe 25-30 min." The friend then asked, "Is it gonna be one of those flights where you have to use those mad piloting skills again?

- At 0004, the pilot responded stating, "Yea to take off after that should be good."

- At 0005, the friend asked the pilot, "They still getting the patient loaded." He then responded, "Yea they still in the ambulance."

- At 0006, the friend stated, "At least they have the best pilot taking them there." The pilot responded that, "I wouldn't say all that…" (This was the last text message sent by the pilot before the accident occurred).

Get-There-Itis

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making, "pilots, particularly those with considerable experience, as a rule always try to complete a flight as planned, please passengers, meet schedules, and generally demonstrate that they have 'the right stuff.'."

One of the common behavioral traps identified was "Get-There-Itis." According to the AC, "common among pilots, [get-there-itis] clouds the vision and impairs judgment by causing a fixation on the original goal or destination combined with a total disregard for any alternative course of action."

Get-There-Itis is also known as hurry syndrome, plan continuation, or goal fixation.

Spatial Disorientation

The FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) contained guidance which stated that "under normal flight conditions, when there is a visual reference to the horizon and ground, the sensory system in the inner ear helps to identify the pitch, roll, and yaw movements of the airplane. When visual contact with the horizon is lost, the vestibular system becomes unreliable. Without visual references outside the airplane, there are many situations where combinations of normal motions and forces can create convincing illusions that are difficult to overcome." The Handbook also advised, "unless a pilot has many hours of training in instrument flight, flight in reduced visibility or at night when the horizon is not visible should be avoided."

According to the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3), "night flying is very different from day flying and demands more attention of the pilot. The most noticeable difference is the limited availability of outside visual references. Therefore, flight instruments should be used to a greater degree.… Generally, at night it is difficult to see clouds and restrictions to visibility, particularly on dark nights or under overcast. The pilot flying under VFR must exercise caution to avoid flying into clouds or a layer of fog." The handbook described some hazards associated with flying in airplanes under VFR when visual references, such as the ground or horizon, are obscured stating that "the vestibular sense (motion sensing by the inner ear) in particular tends to confuse the pilot. Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated; leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/28/2015
Flight Time: (Estimated) 5424 hours (Total, all aircraft), 90 hours (Total, this make and model), 5388 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Other Flight Crew Information

Certificate: None
Age: 38, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Other Flight Crew Information

Certificate: None
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: EUROCOPTER
Registration: N911GF
Model/Series: AS 350 B2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1998
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3119
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/12/2016, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4961 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 8923.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: Arriel/1D1
Registered Owner: HAYNES LIFE FLIGHT LLC
Rated Power: 641 hp
Operator: Metro Aviation Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: HDNA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: EDN, 360 ft msl
Observation Time: 0015 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 17°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 300 ft agl
Visibility:  3 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Mist; Drizzle; Fog
Departure Point: Goodman, AL (None)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Montgomery, AL (AL11)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0017 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Farm Field (None)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 283 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Rough; Vegetation; Wet
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 31.279444, -85.971111

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA140
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Enterprise, AL
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350 B2, registration: N911GF
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 26, 2016 about 0018 central daylight time, a Eurocopter AS 350 B2, N911GF, impacted trees and terrain near Enterprise, Alabama. The airline transport pilot, flight nurse, flight paramedic, and patient being transported, were fatally injured. The helicopter, registered to Haynes Life Flight LLC. and operated by Metro Aviation Inc. was substantially damaged. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135, as a helicopter emergency medical services flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan. The flight departed from a farm field near Goodman, Alabama about 0017, destined for Baptist Medical Center Heliport (AL11), Montgomery, Alabama.

According to the Coffee County Sherriff's Office, on March 25, 2016 at approximately 2309, a 911 called was received when a witness observed a motor vehicle accident on County Road 606 near Goodman, Alabama. Sheriff's deputies were dispatched along with Enterprise Rescue Squad. Deputies also contacted Haynes Life Flight dispatch, when it was discovered that the vehicle was overturned and that an unconscious victim was inside.

According to communications records, the call from the deputies was received by Haynes Life Flight Dispatch at 23:19:10. The pilot of "Life Flight 2," which was based at the Troy Regional Medical Center, Troy Alabama was notified at 23:20:38. The helicopter departed Troy at 23:26:57 and arrived at the landing zone (LZ) in a farm field adjacent to County Road 606 at 23:53:15.

According to witnesses, after touchdown, the pilot remained in the helicopter with the engine running. The flight paramedic and flight nurse exited the helicopter and entered the Enterprise Rescue Squad ambulance to help prepare the patient for transport. Once the patient was ready for transport, the flight nurse and flight paramedic along with several other emergency responders rolled the gurney approximately 70 yards through a grassy area to the helicopter and loaded the patient on-board. Once the patient had been loaded, the flight nurse and flight paramedic boarded, and at 00:16:45 the helicopter lifted off and turned north towards AL11.

Fog, mist, and reduced visibility existed at the LZ at the time of the helicopter's arrival. Witnesses also observed that these same conditions were still present when the helicopter lifted off approximately 23 minutes later. The helicopter climbed vertically into cloud layer that was approximately 150 feet above ground level and disappeared when it turned left in a northbound direction toward AL11. Review of the recorded weather at Enterprise Municipal Airport (EDN), Enterprise, Alabama, located 4 nautical miles east of the accident site, at 0015, included winds from 120 degrees at 4 knots, 3 statute miles visibility in drizzle, overcast clouds at 3oo feet, temperature 17 degrees C, dew point 17 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

According to Haynes Life Flight, the on-board Skyconnect satellite tracking system provided position updates for the helicopter every 3 minutes. Additionally, the pilot was supposed to contact them every 15 minutes via radio. After the helicopter departed on the accident flight, Haynes Life Flight did not receive the pilot's normal 15-minute check-in, and when they checked the satellite tracking system, it showed that the helicopter was still at the LZ, though they knew it had lifted off. Haynes Life Flight then began to notify authorities that the helicopter was missing. After an extensive search by authorities, at approximately 0700, and around the area of County Road 615 and 616, search parties began to smell what they believed was jet fuel. The helicopter was eventually located the wreckage in a swampy, heavily wooded area.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the United States Army from the approach control radar site at Cairns Army Airfield (OZR), Fort Rucker, Alabama, located 13 nautical miles east of the accident site, indicated that after takeoff the helicopter had entered a left turn, and climbed to 1,000 feet above mean sea level. At 00:18:04, the rate of turn began to increase. At 00:18:18 the rate of turn continued to increase and the helicopter reached a peak altitude of 1,100 feet. It remained at this altitude until approximately 00:18:28 when the helicopter began a rapid descent. Five seconds later, that helicopter had descended through 600 feet. Moments later, radar contact was lost when the helicopter descended below the floor of the radar coverage area.

Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the helicopter had struck trees approximately a 1/2-mile north of where it had departed. A debris path that passed through the trees prior to where the helicopter came to rest and ran from south to north, exhibited an approximate 45-degree descent angle through the trees. The wreckage was heavily fragmented with only the aft fuselage being generally recognizable. The fuel tank was broken open, and the smell of jet fuel was present. The engine and transmission were separated from their mounts, and the helicopter had struck a large tree prior to coming to rest. A crater approximately 10 by 20 feet wide was present prior to a large tree the wreckage came to rest next to, and other trees (approximately 80 to 100 feet tall) along the energy path, exhibited impact damage and evidence of blade strikes.

Evidence of power was visible on the main rotor blades (MRBs) and the blue and red MRBs were broken in mutual locations. The transmission and engine were also separated from the fuselage.

The tail boom displayed a right horizontal bend mid-span but the right horizontal stabilizer and the tail rotor had remained attached to the tail boom, with both tail rotor blades exhibiting minimal damage. Control continuity and rotation were confirmed from the tailrotor to the aft bulkhead. The left side horizontal stabilizer was separated from its mounting location. The tail rotor pedals were separated from their mounting locations; however, continuity throughout the tail rotor flex ball cable was confirmed.

Continuity was also confirmed through the transmission and the top mounts of the left lateral and fore-aft main rotor hydraulic servos indicated that they had separated from the transmission due to overload forces. No abnormalities with hydraulic servo integrity were noted, and all push pull tubes and mixing units actuators were observed to be broken with overload signatures.

Examination of the engine revealed that it had separated from the helicopter during the impact sequence. Externally the engine displayed impact damage. Examination of the free turbine revealed that it had not shed its blades. The Fuel Control Unit (FCU) was separated from the accessory gearbox but both FCU shafts were present and not broken, and the FCU remained attached by the fuel and air lines. The P2 line was still attached on both the intermediate case and the FCU. The axial compressor had foreign object damage (FOD), on all 13 blades, and curling opposite the direction of rotation was observed on several. Both Module 1 and Module 5 magnetic plugs were clean. Both electric chip detectors (main and TU208 rear bearing) were clean. Module 5 was removed and the input pinion slippage mark was found displaced in the over-torqued direction approximately 2-2 1/2 mm, consistent with power at the time of main rotor strike. The freewheel shaft was checked and proper operation confirmed. Continuity to the N2 drive of the FCU was confirmed. The gas generator and free turbine could not be turned by hand. The oil, air, and fuel lines were remained connected to engine and properly saftied. The electrical connection cannon plugs were still connected to the engine deck, but the harnesses had broken during the impact sequence. The rear engine mount was still connected to the linking tube but both rubber mounts were separated from the engine deck. The front support was broken at the connection to the aircraft liaison tube. The transmission shaft was found inside the liaison tube but neither side flector groups nor bolts were connected to it. The flector group on the engine side was still connected to the flanged adapter and on the freewheel shaft. The 3 bolts to the transmission shaft had been broken and the holes were found elongated opposite the direction of rotation consistent with power being produced at rotor strike.

The accident helicopter was manufactured in 1998. It was equipped with a three-blade main rotor system, a two-blade tail rotor system, and was powered by a Turbomeca Arriel 1D1 engine rated at 641 shaft horsepower. The helicopter was equipped with skid-type landing gear, Night vision goggles (NVG) and NVG-compatible lighting, a helicopter terrain avoidance warning system, and an autopilot. The helicopter was not certificated for flight in IMC conditions.

According to the operator, the helicopter was maintained under a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved aircraft inspection program. The helicopter's most recent inspection was completed on February 12, 2016. At the time of the accident, the helicopter had accrued 8,923.2 total hours of operation.

According to FAA records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for helicopter and type ratings for the AB-139 and AW-139. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for helicopter and instrument helicopter. According to the operator, he had been employed by them for approximately 6 months and had 90 hours of flight experience in the accident helicopter make and model since he was hired. His total flight experience was 5,301 hours, 5,265 of which was as pilot in command, 474 hours of which was at night, and 265 of which were in actual instrument meteorological conditions. His flight experience during the 90 days prior to the accident was 47 hours, including 20 hours in the 30 days prior to the accident.

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.



Speeding at an estimated 90 miles per hour in a 45 mph zone on a dark, misted-covered, unlighted two-lane county road is, according to the official Alabama Uniform Traffic Crash Report, likely what led to a single car crash Friday night, March 25, near Enterprise.

The initial investigation into the accident indicates that “aggressive operation as the primary contributing circumstance that caused the crash,” according to Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Spokesman Trooper Kevin Cook. “Aggressive Operation can be different maneuvers but for this particular crash, aggressive operation would pertain to speed.”

The 1995 Acura Integra was being driven by 27-year-old Zachary (Zach) Strickland of Enterprise.

Troopers said the crash—which occurred on Coffee County Road 606, also known as College Street Extension—involved the car going into a ditch then hitting a utility pole.

Specifically, the crash report states Strickland’s vehicle  “was traveling west bound on (County Road) 606 at an extremely high rate of speed. (The Acura) left the riht (sic) of the roadway and hit a culvert. Unit one then went airborne, hit a guide wire on a utility pole and overturned before coming to final rest. It should also be noted that a controlled substance was found inside the vehicle that was packaged in a way consistent with illegal sale/purchase.” In addition, the report states Strickland was trapped in the vehicle and that the car was totaled.

The time stamp on the report states police were notified at 11:10 p.m. of the accident and arrived on the scene at 11:45 p.m. It states emergency medical personnel arrived on the scene at 11:25 p.m. Cook said the air ambulance helicopter had already lifted off from the scene when the trooper arrived.

On Saturday, March 26, Coffee County Emergency Management Deputy Director James Brown said Strickland was unconscious with severe injuries including a broken leg when he was airlifted.

This week, Brown states he was told the man was unconscious, but looking back at records now, he sees that authorities on the scene reported Strickland was awake and expressing pain when he was removed from the vehicle. 

Brown said there are other indications in reports that Strickland was not always conscious because officers stated in reports that the victim “was awake at times” rather than all the time. Brown also said Strickland’s injuries were way “more severe” than had first been reported. The EMA deputy director also said a second 911 call that was received by dispatch in regards to the accidents “inferred” the victim was possibly unconscious.

A gofundme page has been set up for Strickland’s young daughter. On that page, an Angel Hernandez—who says he is Strickland’s brother—states, “March 26th was a very tragic day for my family. We lost my brother Zach Strickland. Around 11:30 I received a call that Zach had been in a car accident. When I arrived I learned that Zach had a broken femur and a possible collapsed lung. The call was made to put him on a helicopter to be transported to Montgomery. A little while later I got a call that the helicopter had been lost.”

Per protocol in situations where there is significant trauma to an accident victim, at some point the decision was made by first responders to call for an air ambulance assist, as opposed to using a ground ambulance.

Beau Camp with Pilcher’s Ambulance Service in Dothan—not connected to the incident—explained that when there are severe injuries to a victim, perhaps an elongated extraction time and other factors, the medical personnel working the scene must determine if an expedited transportation method—such as air transport—is warranted. Camp said if the patient is conscious and in “their right mind” they can tell rescuers where he/she wants to be taken and any such request would be honored. However, Camp said, to his knowledge, Strickland, was, in fact, unconscious as has been previously reported.

The Alabama Trauma and Health System protocols were activated and according to adph.org, “The system improves the chances of survival, regardless of proximity to an urban trauma center…Alabama is the only state in the United States with the capability to constantly monitor the status of every trauma hospital and route the trauma patient to the right hospital every time. This system is the model for the rest of the nation.”

The Wiregrass area falls under Region 5 of the system and includes Autauga, Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Coffee, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Elmore, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Montgomery, Pike and Russell counties.

Though Strickland was alive when he was flown from the accident scene, only minutes later, he and the three-member crew of a Haynes Life Flight died when the helicopter went down in a swampy, wooded area about a mile from the car accident scene. They were en route to a Montgomery hospital, according to the official care accident report.

The victims were identified by officials to be pilot Chad Hammond of Eufaula, flight nurse Stasi Cernadas of Montgomery, flight medic Jason Snipes of Verbena and patient Strickland.

The helicopter crash is estimated by authorities to have occurred within three minutes of take-off from the automobile accident.

The chopper had been reported missing about 12:17 a.m. Saturday, officials said. Because of treacherous weather conditions, including low visibility, law enforcement was unable to locate the crash site—in a remote densely wooded and swampy area—off of Coffee County Road 615 until just after 7 a.m. Saturday, said Coffee County Chief Deputy Ronnie Whitworth.

The Federal Aviation Administration arrived at the crash scene after lunch the day of the crash, then the National Transportation and Safety Board arrived later on, taking control of the crash investigation.

The NTSB and other officials were able to move the heavily damaged and mangled aircraft from the crash location to higher ground on Monday, March 28.

A preliminary report from NTSB investigators is expected some time this week. A final report could take up to a year. Susan Stevenson with the NTSB in Washington, D.C. said, via email, that she does “not have a date at this time for the preliminary report” but it might “possibly (be released) by end of (this) week.”

Officials will not speculate if the weather conditions were a factor in the deadly crash.

Strickland was laid to rest Wednesday, March 30, in Dothan. The service was streamed live from Sunset Memorial Park. There was standing room only at the service. The mother of his little girl, Ashley Danner, was the only speaker. She said, “He was a free spirit and was never meant to be tamed.”

The young man is survived by his daughter, Preslee Strickland; his mother Beth Duncan; grandmother, Dana Holmes; his brothers Angel Hernandez and Josh Long, according to the online obituary.

A memorial service for the three helicopter crew members was held in Troy March 31 at Troy University’s Sartain Hall. That service was held before a crowded facility and, like Strickland’s service, was streamed live on the web. Three caskets covered in American flags were parked at the front of the service. Multiple speakers called the three dedicated heroes.


http://www.southeastsun.com


Speed was the cause of car accident, the catalyst leading to the air ambulance crash

The initial investigation into a one-vehicle accident last Friday night, March 25, near Enterprise indicates that “aggressive operation as the primary contributing circumstance that caused the crash,” according to Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Spokesman Trooper Kevin Cook. “Aggressive Operation can be different maneuvers but for this particular crash, aggressive operation would pertain to speed.”

The 1995 Acura Integra was being driven by 27-year-old Zachary (Zach) Strickland of Enterprise.

Troopers said the crash—which occurred on Coffee County Road 606, also known as College Street Extension—involved the car going into a ditch then hitting a utility pole.

Strickland was said to be unconscious at the scene with extensive injuries, including a broken leg.

Per protocol in situations where there is significant trauma to an accident victim, at some point the decision was made by first responders to call for an air ambulance assist. Beau Camp with Pilcher’s Ambulance Service in Dothan—not connected to the incident—explained that when there are severe injuries to a victim, perhaps an elongated extraction time and other factors, the medical personnel working the scene must determine if an expedited transportation method—such as air transport—is warranted.

Camp said if the patient is conscious and in “their right mind” they can tell rescuers where he/she wants to be taken and any such request would be honored. However, Camp said, to his knowledge, Strickland, was, in fact, unconscious as has been previously reported.

The Alabama Trauma and Health System protocols were activated and according to adph.org, “The system improves the chances of survival, regardless of proximity to an urban trauma center.

The system is voluntary and all hospitals are invited to participate. Participating hospitals are designated as levels one, two, or three, depending on their resources and services availability. Hospitals are inspected to verify that they can provide the level of care for which they have applied. Alabama is the only state in the United States with the capability to constantly monitor the status of every trauma hospital and route the trauma patient to the right hospital every time. This system is the model for the rest of the nation.”

The Wiregrass area falls under Region 5 of the system and includes Autauga, Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Coffee, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Elmore, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Montgomery, Pike and Russell counties.

Though Strickland was alive when he was flown from the accident scene, only minutes later, he and the three-member crew of a Haynes Life Flight died when the helicopter went down in a swampy, wooded area about a mile from the car accident scene. They were en route to a Montgomery hospital.

Alabama EMA spokesman Greg Robinson identified the victims Sunday as pilot Chad Hammond of Eufaula, flight nurse Stasi Cernadas of Montgomery, flight medic Jason Snipes of Verbena and patient Strickland.

The helicopter crash is estimated to have occurred within three minutes of take-off from the automobile accident. Nearby residents said it was foggy Friday evening, March 25, with misting rain off and on.

The chopper had been reported missing about 12:17 a.m. Saturday, officials said. Because of treacherous weather conditions, including low visibility, law enforcement was unable to locate the crash site—in a remote densely wooded and swampy area—off of Coffee County Road 615 until just after 7 a.m. Saturday. Continuous heavy rains and thunderstorms most of the day made recovery impossible until the weather temporarily cleared in the afternoon.

By 4 p.m. Saturday, the remains of all four victims had been recovered and were taken to Montgomery to the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences.

The Federal Aviation Administration arrived at the crash scene after lunch Saturday and then the National Transportation and Safety Board arrived later on. The NTSB is the lead investigator of the crash.

The NTSB and other officials were able to move the heavily damaged and mangled aircraft from the crash location to higher ground on Monday, March 28. Investigators spent much of Tuesday methodically going over the crash pieces.

Two reports will be issued by the NTSB. A preliminary report is expected some time next week. When it is made available the report is expected to include investigator’s findings based on their and other’s observations at the scene. A final report could take up to a year. Susan Stevenson with the NTSB in Washington, D.C. said, via email, that she does “not have a date at this time for the preliminary report” but it might “possibly (be released) by end of next week.”

Officials will not speculate if the weather conditions were a factor in the deadly crash.

Strickland was laid to rest Wednesday afternoon in Dothan. The service was streamed live from Sunset Memorial Park. There was standing room only at the service. The mother of his little girl, Ashley Danner, was the only speaker. She said, “He was a free spirit and was never meant to be tamed.” The young man is survived by his daughter, Preslee Strickland; his mother Beth Duncan; grandmother, Dana Holmes; his brothers Angel Hernandez and Josh Long.

A memorial service for the three crew members was held in Troy March 31 at Troy University’s Sartain Hall. That service was held before a crowded facility and, like Strickland’s service Wednesday, was streamed live on the web. Three caskets covered in American flags were parked at the front of the service. Multiple speakers called the three dedicated heroes.

The Troy service was organized by The Honor Network, Haynes Life Flight, the Troy Fire Department, the Troy Police Department and the Troy University Police Department.

Funeral services for the pilot, Hammond, will be held Friday, April 1 at 3 p.m. at Parkview Baptist Church. Individual services of the other two crew members are not known.


http://www.southeastsun.com

While it is too early to know for sure what led to a fatal air ambulance helicopter crash March 26, a helicopter crash expert, attorney and author Gary C. Robb said, “If you rule out mechanical malfunction then, obviously, you’re looking at pilot error or a combination of that and the environment and weather.”

National Transportation and Safety Board officials said earlier that it appeared everything (mechanical) was working on the helicopter at the time of the crash, but that the entire investigation will likely take up to a year to complete. A preliminary report is expected next week, according to Susan Stevenson with the NTSB in Washington, D.C.

“With trained investigators, they can look and see (at the crash scene)—based on certain signs and signatures of markings” whether or not the main rotor blade separated before impact, or if the engine was operating by looking for “continuous spin marks” on the engine, Robb said, adding that if there’s no indication of the engine “spinning at impact” then that is a sign that the “helicopter engine stopped in flight.”

Robb said investigators will continue to look at “the man, the machine, and the environment” to eventually determine the cause of the fatal crash. He said investigators will look at the pilot, Chad Hammond, to determine “his qualifications, experience” and whether or not any medical conditions such as “stroke, heart attack or aneurysms” had occurred. Robb also said investigators will look closely at the helicopter, itself, to see if there were “malfunctions or fractures of any component or system in the aircraft.” And, he added, the environment—weather, fixed obstacles that the helicopter could have hit—will also be closely studied.

The weather, at the time of the crash, was reported as inclement and foggy by officials and area residents.

Robb, a nationwide attorney based in Kansas City, Mo., said he was interested in the Haynes Life Flight crash because “it has all the earmarks of what we would we call an utterly preventable crash. It’s sad because, many times, the very conditions (and situations) that create the need for the helicopter…requires the helicopter, itself, to fly through very dangerous conditions.

"So, what we have is one accident, followed by another for the same reasons…Real human beings perished. That’s the true tragedy here,” said Robb. “The point is, is that innocent people got up and brushed their teeth and were alive that morning were not alive to go to sleep that night…It’s a human tragedy, not just that a helicopter crashed.”

The Missouri attorney said he has been advocating “risk assessments of the risks of the helicopter missions” for years so that crews are not put in danger.

Robb said the investigation of such crashes takes a long while “because the NTSB is extremely busy…they need to acquire a lot of information. They need to get information from the manufacturer. They need to find out if this helicopter was certified to fly…They usually do a very thorough and complete job, in my experience.”

Familiar with the Eurocopter AS350—the type helcopter that crashed— and its history of crashes in the past, Robb said he has been involved with “dozens and dozens” of cases involving the aircraft over many years. However, he said, it’s too early to speculate about what has happened in the Coffee County crash in terms of the type aircraft because it’s like a “500 piece puzzle. We have five pieces of that puzzle. We don’t know, yet, what’s going to happen…

"We don’t have the other pieces…Right now, I could only speculate. I could only speculate that, obviously, the fog had something to do with it. The pilot may have become disoriented and lost orientation—spatial disorientation—and (was) flying blind.” He added, however, that until there is more information, there’s no way to come to a conclusion.

Robb does question, however, the operational necessity of the mission and wonders why a ground ambulance wasn’t utilized and a closer medical facility sought.

The patient in the Enterprise crash, Zachary Strickland, was said to be unconscious at the scene with extensive injuries, including a broken leg. Per protocol in situations where there is significant trauma to an accident victim, at some point the decision was made by first responders to call for an air ambulance assist.

Beau Camp with Pilcher’s Ambulance Service in Dothan—not connected to the incident—explained that when there are severe injuries to a victim, perhaps an elongated extraction time or other factors, the medical personnel working the scene must determine if expedited transportation methods—such as air transport—is warranted. Camp said if the patient is conscious and in “their right mind” they can tell rescuers where he/she wants to be taken and any such request would be honored. However, Camp said, to his knowledge, Strickland was, in fact, unconscious, as has been previously reported. Thus, the Alabama Trauma and Health System protocols were activated.

http://www.southeastsun.com

TROY, AL (WSFA) -  On Thursday, March 31, 2016, a memorial service was held for Stasi Cernadas, Chad Hammond and Jason Snipes, the three first responders killed in a medical helicopter crash in Coffee County on Saturday.

The service was held at Troy University and was organized by The Honor Network, an organization that conducts memorial services honoring fallen heroes. The event was conducted by Haynes Life Flight, the City of Troy Fire Department,  the City of Troy Police Department and the Troy University Police Department.

Special guest speakers at the memorial were Phillip Winningham and Corey Pittman, NREMTP.  Special statements were presented from U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden and Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange. The program included remarks by Chris Heisler, Founder of the U.S. Honor Flag and President of The Honor Network, Troy City Mayor Jason Reeves, Kirk Barrett, President and COO of Haynes Ambulance of Alabama, and Chancellor Jack Hawkins Jr. of Troy University.

Full video:   http://www.wtvm.com




Flight medic Jason Snipes


The victims in the March 26, 2016 Haynes Lifeflight crash, clockwise, are: Chad Hammond, Stacey Cernadas, Zach Strickland and Jason Snipes. 



State troopers blocked traffic on County Road 615 on Saturday, March 26, 2016, as rains saturated area. The road is more than 500 yards from the site of a Haynes Life Flight helicopter crash that took the lives of a pilot, flight nurse, medic and patient early that morning.

"The FAA inspector showed up on scene and started his part of the investigation. The NTSB investigators arrived in the area Saturday night,” said Larry Walker, director of the Coffee County Emergency Management Agency.

The investigation continues as Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board workers comb through the wreckage.

"We'd like to offer our condolences to the friends and families of the victims of this tragic accident,” said Todd Gunther, the lead investigator with the NTSB.”

The crash happened minutes after takeoff near County Road 606, where the flight crew was attempting to transport car accident victim Zach Strickland to a hospital.

"As far as we know, all of the flight controls on the helicopter were functional at the time. We also have no evidence of any type of structural failure of the helicopter,” Gunther said. “There were some areas that were low-visibility, and from our understanding, were about a half a mile visibility or lower, and that's something that our meteorologists are looking at.”

Today, investigators were hauling debri from the crash site in the woods to a nearby backyard, where they will do a 2-D reconstruction over the next three to five days, before transporting it to a Georgia facility for further investigation.

"We're currently conducting witness interviews. We're also looking at the EMS on the aircraft, the structure of the aircraft, the weather conditions with the aircraft, and we're also looking at the physiology of the pilot and flight crew that was on board,” said Gunther.s

A preliminary report is expected within 10 days, and it could take up to a year before the NTSB issues a statement of probable cause.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.dothanfirst.com



This is the helipad at Troy Regional where the helicopter that crashed took off from Friday night.


Several weeks ago, flight medic Jason Snipes responded to a crash and did what he did – airlifted a woman to Southeast Alabama Medical Center to get the help she needed for her injuries.

But Snipes didn't stop there. When a GoFundMe account was later set up for the victim, Snipes visited that page, where he left words of encouragement for the woman. "I offer my prayers to you, her and your family,'' Snipes wrote. "If I may offer a verse that has helped me throughout my life, that is HEB 11:1 – Faith is the substance of all things hoped for but not yet seen. Maintain your faith. It will move mountains."

When he was called a hero for his efforts, Snipes gave credit where he thought credit was due. "I'm not a hero...God does his work through my hands."

"That's just the kind of person he was,'' said Kyle McDonnell, operations manager for Regional Paramedical Services of Alabama, where Snipes used to work. "He was just a very compassionate person."

Snipes, 34, was one of four people killed the weekend crash of a Haynes LifeFlight helicopter in southeast Alabama early Saturday. The others killed were: pilot Chad Hammond, 29; nurse Stacey Cernadas, 38, and patient Zach Strickland, 27.

The chopper crashed in Saturday's predawn hours in Goodman, about 80 miles south of Montgomery – after picking up Strickland from the scene of a highway crash.

"The weather was described as inclement, foggy," said Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board. "We will be getting more specifics about visibility and the weather conditions the helicopter would have been encountering."

The aircraft was found in a heavily wooded and marshy area, and the plan Monday was to recover the wreckage from the remote area, Knudson said.

"Once they are able to get the helicopter to dry, higher ground, they will work on documenting the components of the wreckage," he said.

The helicopter had been called after a motorist struck a ditch and a utility pole in a one-car vehicle crash about 11 p.m. Friday, Trooper Kevin Cook was quoted by the Dothan Eagle as saying. The helicopter took off with the motorist, and was reported missing at 12:17 a.m. Saturday. The wreckage was later discovered about a half-mile from the scene of the vehicle crash, the newspaper reported.

Metro Aviation Inc. of Shreveport, Louisiana, which operated the helicopter for an Alabama ambulance company, issued a statement Monday saying that the company "places safety at the top of our priority list" and that a company response team is assisting federal authorities with the investigation.

It will likely take several months or as much as a year or longer for the NTSB to determine the cause of the crash, Knudson said.

The pilot, 29-year-old Hammond, was a husband, father and son. He joined Metro Aviation in October 2015, and previously was an instructor at Cloud 9 Helicopters in Florida. He attended George C. Wallace State Community College, and was a 2005 graduate of Eufaula High School. Just three years ago, the Federal Aviation Administration recognized Hammond with inclusion in the FAA Airmen Certification Database. According to the website, the certification is for pilots who have met or exceeded the high educational, licensing and medical standards established by the FAA.

Cernadas, 38, had been a flight nurse since September. Born in Huntsville but raised in Georgia, she was also a trauma nurse in Montgomery and a former flight attendant. Her father, Javier Cernadas, told WAFF in Huntsville, was living out her dream to be a flight nurse. "Stacey had a larger than life personality and had many, many friends all around the U.S.,'' her father told the television station Saturday. "I can tell you that while we are extremely saddened by today's events, we are immensely proud of Stacey. She loved more than anything being a flight nurse and helping those in critical need."

Snipes was previously a supervisor with RPS and based in Shelby County. McDonnell said he was an outstanding paramedic, especially to be so young. "To be as young as he was, he was a great paramedic. They usually come out of school scared or thinking they know everything, but not Jason. He was a sponge. He was pretty impressive, really."

Snipes left RPS to eventually join Haynes. "He was always wanting to fly,'' McDonnell said. "That's been a dream of his for quite some time."

"He often contacted his patients afterward,'' he said. "He cared for every patient he picked up. This is just heartbreaking."

Strickland – the patient – was almost home when he was involved in the car crash that ultimately led to him being on the rescue helicopter. Close friend Mike Shroades said Strickland owned about 20 to 40 acres and was less than 500 feet from turning on to his property when the crash happened. After inheriting money from his grandparents, he had bought his parents a home and moved into a double-wide he put out back.

"He would bend over backwards to help anybody," Shroades said. He said it was several years ago that Strickland saved Shroades' life following a dirt bike accident. Strickland told him he needed to go to the hospital, but Shroades said he was being hard-headed and resisted. "He threw me in the truck and drove 110 miles per hour for hours to get me to a hospital,'' he said. "When we got there, they told me I would have been dead in 30 more minutes. I give all the respect I can to him for saving my life."

Strickland, he said, didn't live fancy or dress fancy but probably owned more than 120 cars. "He loved cars, trucks, four-wheelers, he loved it all,'' Shroades said. "He lived life to the fullest."

Shroades said the two were close, and Strickland was well-known in the small community. "Everybody knew Zach,'' he said. "Behind all of the tattoos was nothing but a big heart. I am devastated."

Haynes Ambulance of Alabama issued this statement: "Words cannot explain the hurt that the Haynes LifeFlight/Ambulance is feeling. We would like to thank everyone for their support during these difficult times. It is truly heart-warming. Please continue to keep the families in your prayers as they have suffered tremendous loss. Godspeed Chad, Stacey, Jason, Zach. You're gone but will never be forgotten. You have earned your wings, now wear them proudly."


Story, video and photo: http://www.al.com

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board spent most of Monday recovering the wreckage of a downed air ambulance helicopter. An early-morning crash Saturday in Coffee County killed three Haynes Air Ambulance crew members and a patient. 

NTSB spokesperson Peter Knudson said Monday that investigators will likely spend Tuesday examining the crash components in an attempt to determine the factors that may have led to Saturday’s crash.

According to reports, Haynes Air Ambulance responded to an automobile accident after 11 p.m. Friday on Coffee County Road 606, near the Goodman community west of Enterprise. The automobile accident victim was unconscious and suffering from a broken leg. The downed helicopter was found near the intersection of County roads 615 and 616, about ½ mile from the site of the automobile wreck.

The NTSB issues two investigative reports. A preliminary report is issued a relatively short time after the incident and includes observable findings based on what investigators initially observe at the scene, or gather from other sources. Knudson said Monday that a preliminary report on the Haynes crash should be issued next week. A final report based on a deeper look at the aircraft components, interviews, tests and other data could take several months or more than a year.

It is currently unknown whether poor weather conditions contributed to the accident.

In 2014, the Federal Aviation Administration required helicopter operators, including air ambulances, to have stricter flight rules and procedures regarding weather, improved communications and training, and additional on-board safety equipment in response to a large number of air ambulance crashes over the previous 20 years.

The FAA examined helicopter air ambulance crashes from 1991 to 2010 and determined 62 accidents that resulted in 125 fatalities could have been “mitigated” by the enhanced rules approved in 2014. From 2011 through 2013, there were seven air ambulance accidents resulting in 19 fatalities.

The FAA identified four common factors in the accidents — inadvertent flight into conditions where weather caused the pilot to be unable to see and rely on instruments, loss of control, controlled flight into terrain, and night conditions.

Among other requirements, the rule specifies certain weather thresholds and visibility requirements, requires flight planning and pre-flight risk analysis, safety briefings for medical personnel and the establishment of operations control centers for certain operators. It also requires air ambulances to be equipped with a flight data monitoring system as well as a radio altimeter to assist pilots in determining height above ground.

The rule also requires helicopter air ambulance operators to conduct a preflight risk analysis that includes characteristics of the planned flight path, weather conditions, and if the flight has been rejected by another operator. Air ambulance operators may ask the dispatching agency if the flight has been rejected by another operator.

Weather conditions were reported as overcast with possible fog in the area near the approximate time of the crash.

According to the weather reporting station at the Andalusia Airport, several miles west of the crash site, visibility varied from as much as 10 miles to as little as ½ mile in the late night hours of Friday and the early morning hours of Saturday due to fog. The weather conditions at the site of the vehicle accident or helicopter crash are not currently known. A detailed weather summary is expected in the NTSB preliminary report.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dothaneagle.com

Coffee County Deputy EMA Director James Brown confirms that four people were killed in a Haynes Lifeflight helicopter crash late Friday night in rural Coffee County.
~








A National Transportation Safety Board spokesman said preliminary information shows weather conditions were foggy, with low visibility, at the time a Haynes Life Flight Eurocopter AS350 crashed Saturday after responding to a vehicle wreck in Coffee County. 

Coffee County Coroner Robert Preachers said the following were killed in the crash: Metro Aviation rotor wing pilot Chad Hammond, 29, of Eufaula, Haynes Ambulance critical care nurse Stacey Cernadas, 38, of Montgomery, Haynes Ambulance critical care medic Jason Snipes, 35, of Chilton County, and patient Zachary Strickland, 28, of Enterprise.

NTSB is the lead investigator of the medical helicopter incident. According to NTSB spokesman Peter Knudson, the aircraft may have crashed sometime around 2 a.m. Saturday when weather conditions were foggy and there was low visibility.

He said an official cause of the crash could take a year to be determined, though an initial report might be completed within the next two weeks.

“The area is heavily wooded and swampy, so we’re working to get equipment to the scene to move the helicopter to higher ground,” Knudson said Sunday.

He said NTSB’s focus on Sunday was identifying how the aircraft came to rest, as well as speaking with witnesses and further identifying the weather conditions at the time of the crash.

Authorities said Saturday the aircraft was responding to a one-vehicle wreck around 11 p.m. Friday on Coffee County Road 606, also known as College Street Extension, near the Goodman Community.

Alabama Law Enforcement Agency spokesman, Trooper Kevin Cook, stated the vehicle, which Strickland was driving, struck a ditch and then a utility pole. Strickland was reportedly unconscious and suffered a broken leg from the vehicle crash.

A complete vehicle crash report is expected to be released later.

Authorities said Saturday the Life Flight that retrieved Strickland from the scene of the vehicle incident was reported missing around 12:17 a.m. Saturday. 

Authorities discovered the aircraft downed around 7:02 a.m. Saturday near the intersection of Coffee County roads 615 and 616, which was about a half-mile from where the vehicle wreck took place.

Knudson said the aircraft was operated by Metro Aviation. According to its website, Metro Aviation is based in Louisiana and provides operations services, including pilots and maintenance technicians, for aircraft that respond to emergency scene calls and inter-hospital transfers.

The company operates 130 aircraft for more than 30 programs in 18 states, according to its website.

Metro Aviation spokesperson Karen King issued this statement Sunday when contacted by the Dothan Eagle:

“Metro Aviation places safety at the top of our priority list and our response team is in Alabama to assist the FAA and NTSB with the investigation. Our hearts and prayers are with everyone involved in the accident, including family and friends of those we lost.”

Several social media posts online from agencies and from people referred to those who died Saturday.

The Opp News quoted on Facebook on Saturday the biblical scripture on faith, Hebrews 11:1, as one Snipes had messaged to a mother whose daughter was involved in a crash to which Snipes responded on a Life Flight some weeks ago.

Several of Strickland’s Facebook friends offered condolences to him, describing him as a loving father who was fascinated with cars. Hammond was identified on posts as a loving husband and father, and Cernadas was noted for fun spirit.

Haynes Ambulance of Alabama posted the following statement on Facebook on Sunday:

“…Words cannot explain the hurt that the HaynesLifeflight/ambulance are feeling. We would like to thank everyone for their support during these difficult times it is truly heart warming. Please continue to keep the families in your pray(er)s as they have suffered a tremendous loss. Godspeed.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.dothaneagle.com


COFFEE CO., AL (WSFA) -  A Haynes medical helicopter crew and a patient were killed in a crash early Saturday morning in Coffee County.

Coffee County EMA Deputy Director James Brown confirmed there were four people aboard the helicopter. The crash happened after the three crew members picked up a patient from a single-vehicle accident on Coffee County Road 606.

The EMA identified the victims as Chad Hammond, Pilot; Stacey Cernadas, Flight Nurse; Jason Snipes, Flight Medic; and Zach Strickland, patient.

The victims will be transported to the Alabama Department of Forensic Science in Montgomery.

Brown said the helicopter went missing in a wooded area in Coffee County around 12:17 a.m. Saturday. The crash scene was found just after 7 a.m. The scene is on County Road 615 near County Road 603 in the Goodman Community.

Authorities are trying to determine the cause of the crash.

A Federal Aviation Administration team from Birmingham arrived on the scene early Saturday afternoon. The National Transportation Safety Board is the lead investigating agency and is scheduled to arrive later Saturday.

According to Troy Mayor Jason Reeves, the helicopter was based at Troy Regional Medical Center.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the crew and patient who lost their lives as well as the hundreds of staff and first responders who work with Haynes hand-in-hand across the region,."  Reeves said in a statement. "This is a devastating loss for our community and many others in the area. We will continue to pray for those grieving this loss and those who place their lives in harms way daily to keep our communities safe."

Troy Regional Medical Center CEO Teresa Grimes said the hospital is saddened by the tragic loss.

"We will be in prayer for their families as well as the Haynes Ambulance and Flight staff," Grimes said in a statement.

The Alabama Red Cross is supporting the crew who responded to the crash scene.

Haynes Life Flight expanded to Troy in October, adding a helicopter and base at Troy Regional Medical Center to support 10 south Alabama counties.

The company has another helicopter based in the Wetumpka area.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsfa.com

COFFEE COUNTY – Days could pass before final reports are complete on a medical ambulance helicopter crash that reportedly claimed the lives of three flight staff and a patient who was being transported in the helicopter.

Authorities said a Haynes Life Flight Aerospatiale AS50 helicopter that departed from Troy to respond to a single-vehicle crash on Coffee County Road 606, also known as College Street Extension, near the Goodman Community, was reported missing around 12:17 a.m. after retrieving an unconscious patient with a broken leg from a vehicle wreck to transport to Baptist Medical Center in Montgomery.

The aircraft was discovered downed around 7:02 a.m. Saturday near the intersection of Coffee County roads 615 and 616 in the Goodman Community, about a half-mile from where the vehicle wreck took place. Coffee County Emergency Management Agency Deputy Director James Brown said the aircraft appears to have gone down within three minutes of retrieving the patient.

Brown said a rotor wing pilot, critical care nurse, critical care medic and the local patient were believed aboard the crashed aircraft.

Neither the names of the flight staff, nor of the patient, had been released late Saturday afternoon.

Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Capt. Tracy Nelson said the aircraft crashed in a heavily wooded area that, when coupled with rainfall throughout Saturday, challenged recovery efforts of both the aircraft and of those individuals who died in the crash. Local and state officials used resources such as bulldozers to assist in reaching the crash’s site, and ALEA reported all bodies had been recovered as of Saturday afternoon.

Brown said heavy fog hampered the ability to immediately send other aircraft early Saturday to search for the downed helicopter, but that authorities implemented a four-mile search area on the ground before discovering the aircraft about a half-mile from where the vehicle wreck was.

The cause of the aircraft accident was not available on Saturday. Officials with the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were expected in the area on Saturday and Sunday for an investigation, which an FAA spokesperson stated will be headed by the NTSB. According to reports listed on NTSB’s website, some preliminary reports on other incidents appeared to have been released between a few days and a couple months after NTSB investigations.

An NTSB official had not responded late Saturday afternoon on when the local crash report might be available.

Nelson believed the vehicle wreck happened around 11 p.m. Saturday. He said final reports were in the process of being completed on the vehicle wreck on Saturday.

Haynes, a family-owned, central Alabama service that expanded into helicopter emergency medical services in 2014 in Wetumpka, opened another Life Flight base at Troy Regional Medical Center's helipad in October.


Original article can be found here: http://www.dothaneagle.com

COFFEE CO., AL (WSFA) -  A Haynes medical helicopter crew and a patient were killed in a crash overnight in Coffee County.

Coffee County EMA Deputy Director James Brown confirmed there were four people aboard the helicopter. The crash happened after the three crew members picked up a patient from an auto accident.

Brown said the helicopter went missing in a wooded area in Coffee County around 12:17 a.m. Saturday. The crash scene was found just after 7 a.m. The scene is on County Road 615 near County Road 603 in the Goodman Community.

Authorities are trying to determine the cause of the crash.

A Federal Aviation Administration team from Birmingham arrived on the scene early Friday afternoon. The National Transportation Safety Board is the lead investigating agency and is scheduled to arrive later Saturday.

According to Troy Mayor Jason Reeves, the helicopter was based at Troy Regional Medical Center.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the crew and patient who lost their lives as well as the hundreds of staff and first responders who work with Haynes hand-in-hand across the region,."  Reeves said in a statement. "This is a devastating loss for our community and many others in the area. We will continue to pray for those grieving this loss and those who place their lives in harms way daily to keep our communities safe."

Troy Regional Medical Center CEO Teresa Grimes said the hospital is saddened by the tragic loss.

"We will be in prayer for their families as well as the Haynes Ambulance and Flight staff," Grimes said in a statement.

The Alabama Red Cross is supporting the crew who responded to the crash scene.

Haynes Life Flight expanded to Troy in October, adding a helicopter and base at Troy Regional Medical Center to support 10 south Alabama counties.

The company has another helicopter based in the Wetumpka area.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsfa.com

COFFEE COUNTY – A recovery effort is underway today after a Haynes Lifeflight helicopter crashed early this morning, killing all four people onboard.

James Brown, deputy director of the Coffee County Emergency Management Agency, said the helicopter was reported missing at 12:17 a.m.

“After an extensive search, the aircraft was discovered at 7:02 this morning,” he said. “There were four people on board, and unfortunately all were lost.”

Kirk Barrett of Haynes Ambulance declined to comment. “This is a horrible tragedy. We are just concentrating on the families right now,” he said.

Brown said the helicopter crashed in a deeply wooded area in the Goodman Community. “It’s something nobody would want to happen to anybody,” he said. “It’s bad situation.”

The helicopter was based at Troy Regional Medical Center and had been dispatched to the scene of a motor vehicle accident in Coffee County.

“They picked up a patient, from what I understand he had a broken leg and was unconscious,” Brown said.

The helicopter was enroute to Montgomery when the crash occurred. “We don’t really know what happened,” Brown said, adding the crash was “very soon after takeout, within three minutes.”

He said he would not speculate on what could have caused the crash.

“We did a four mile search. We figured that’s about how far they would be,” Brown said. “They were discovered about a half mile from the accident.”

Brown said the search began shortly after midnight, using helicopters; search teams; and triangulation through cell phone systems. “First responder safety is always our first concern. That’s why we had to wait a little bit to send up another helicopter to search because we had some fog last night,” he said.

Because the crash is in a heavily wooded area with limited access, Brown said the recovery effort could take a couple of days.

Brown said crews from the NTSB and FAA are enroute to the site. “They will take over the investigation when they arrive,” he said.

“The rain will slow us up a bit but don’t think it will stop up. If we do have lightning we will have to stop.”

Teresa Grimes, CEO of Troy Regional where the Lifeflight was based, said the hospital staff were saddened and shocked.

“The Troy Regional Medical Center family is saddened today by the tragic loss of the Haynes helicopter crew members and the patient being transferred,” she said. “We will be in prayer for their families as well as the Haynes ambulance and flight staff.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.troymessenger.com

No comments: