Sunday, September 18, 2016

Cessna 182P Skylane, P & T Aerial Services LLC, N20844: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

P & T AERIAL SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N20844

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Gilbert, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N20844
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1918 Mountain standard time, a Cessna 182P, N20844, was destroyed when it impacted a residential structure, following a reported inflight fire near Gilbert, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the 4 passengers sustained minor injuries. One of the two occupants of the house sustained a minor injury. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD) Chandler, Arizona, at an unknown time.

The airplane was participating in the Gilbert's annual Constitution Fair, which involved an aerial pyro technic display and four skydivers parachuting into a predetermined drop zone about 1 mile northwest from the accident site. According to one of the skydivers, as the airplane arrived at the planned jump area and altitude, about 5,000 feet, mean sea level, he heard a loud noise and noticed damage to the airplane's left wing. Shortly thereafter, the skydivers successfully jumped out of the airplane as its left wing became engulfed with flames. The pilot radioed a distress call and then egressed out of the airplane. The airplane subsequently impacted in a residential area about 4 miles from the north of CHD.

Examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane struck through the house's roof and a post impact fire consumed a majority of the airplane and the interior of the house. 

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.






GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK/AP) -  Radio transmissions from Saturday night indicate that the pilot of a small plane that crashed into a Gilbert home did not have much time after a fire started on the aircraft.

The pilot can be heard saying, "I'm having an emergency situation. Fire on the wing. Fire in the airplane."

The air traffic controller responded by asking if the pilot wanted to land at Chandler Municipal Airport or Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. The pilot, later identified as Ryan Kilgore, never responded and a few seconds later a Southwest Airlines pilot can be heard saying, "That plane went down."

A fire department official said the pilot of the burning plane tried unsuccessfully to put out the fire before he bailed out, following the exit of four skydivers who were his passengers.

Gilbert Fire and Rescue Capt. Josh Ehrman said the pilot donned a parachute and jumped from the single-engine plane, landing in a field about two blocks from the Saturday evening crash.

Ehrman says the four skydivers landed as planned during a fair at a city facility about a half-mile away from the crash site.

We spoke with an experienced pilot Aron Whitesell, Director of Flight Operations at Chopperguy. He's experienced in both helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

Whitesell says a fire in an aircraft is extremely dangerous.

"If the cockpit is full of smoke and No. 1, he can't see. And No. 2, you end up passing out," Whitesell said. 

He says pilots are trained to know their surroundings if an emergency occurred but sometimes that's not good enough. Depending on the emergency, a pilot has to act fast.  

"You can't pull over on the side of the road like a car so a fire is always going to be your biggest concern as a pilot. A lot of time, there is no option. You do your best to avoid people as much as possible, but (there are) power lines, poles, street lights so there is not always going to be an option," Whitesell said. 

Kilgore did suffer burns to his body which leads Whitesell to speculate that he tried to stay with the aircraft as long as possible.  

We have reached out to Kilgore's family but haven't heard back.

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.azfamily.com

Newly obtained cell phone video shows a plane crashing into a Phoenix area home.

In the video the plane appears as a bright dot streaking towards the ground.

The small plane crashed into a Gilbert home Saturday night.

Two people were inside the home at the time of the crash. Neither was injured

Five people were inside the plane, but officials say that since all five of them are skydivers they were able to parachute to safety.

The pilot was the last one to jump out. He landed in a field about a mile from the crash site.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are now investigating what caused the crash.

The pilot did receive burn injuries.


Story and video:   http://www.kvoa.com

Ryan Kilgore
~

Ryan Kilgore Recovery Fund: https://www.gofundme.com




Help Peter and Sharon with damages: https://www.gofundme.com



GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -  An investigation was underway Sunday after a small plane crashed into a house in Gilbert. Miraculously, everyone survived.

Workers began removing wreckage from the home.

A posting to a gofundme account identified the pilot as Ryan Kilgore.

"I started the fundraising page because I have no idea what the medical expenses will be for Ryan's recovery and care, not to mention the emotional trauma of enduring a plane crash," his brother, Colton, wrote. 

"The initial expenses I anticipate are travel costs for our parents to fly to Arizona to be with him tomorrow (Monday), as well as potential loss of work as a result of this incident, and medical costs will follow," his brother stated.

He set a goal of raising $25,000. As of 12:15 p.m. Sunday, more than $4,300 had been pledged.

Daylight revealed the extent of damage. The back wall of the home was almost gone.

Half of the plane made it into the home and the other half was in the backyard.

A gofundme account was also set by neighbors for the couple whose home was ruined by the crash.

The crash happened just after 7 p.m. Saturday near Lindsey and Ray roads.

A neighbor was outside working and could tell something wasn't right.

Abdul Khan is an aircraft mechanic. The loud noise he heard from the plane told him something was terribly wrong.

“This one started coming down like a big ball,” Khan said. “It went flat for a little bit and then started nose-diving. It was so close we thought it was going to come into our house. When it came down, it made a big noise.”

Khan said when he got to the scene, the house was on fire.

The pilot and all four skydivers aboard the single-engine aircraft were able to parachute out of the plane safely.

That plane then struck the roof of a home, causing a huge fire.[

We are told a man and woman were inside at home when the plane hit. Amazingly, they were able to make it out of the house safely and were not injured.

The pilot suffered minor burns and he's being treated at a local hospital.

Shortly after the crash, viewers started contacting us, reporting hearing a loud explosion and seeing a fireball falling from the sky.

By 9:30, Gilbert fire officials said they had the fire under control and were working to put out hot spots.

Gilbert police tweeted that the small plane was carrying skydivers for an annual Constitution Fair event.

"Please keep Ryan in your prayers, for physical and emotional healing, and joining us in thanking God for protecting his life," Colton Kilgore wrote on the gofundme page.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.wsfa.com



GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - An investigation was underway Sunday after a small plane crashed into a house in Gilbert. Miraculously, everyone survived.

A posting to a gofundme account identified the pilot as Ryan Kilgore.

"I started the fundraising page because I have no idea what the medical expenses will be for Ryan's recovery and care, not to mention the emotional trauma of enduring a plane crash," his brother, Colton, wrote. 

"The initial expenses I anticipate are travel costs for our parents to fly to Arizona to be with him tomorrow (Monday), as well as potential loss of work as a result of this incident, and medical costs will follow," his brother stated.

He set a goal of raising $25,000. As of 12:15 p.m. Sunday, more than $4,300 had been pledged.

Daylight revealed the extent of damage. The back wall of the home was almost gone.

Half of the plane made it into the home and the other half was in the backyard.

The crash happened just after 7 p.m. Saturday near Lindsey and Ray roads.

A neighbor was outside working and could tell something wasn't right.

Abdul Khan is an aircraft mechanic. The loud noise he heard from the plane told him something was terribly wrong.

“This one started coming down like a big ball,” Khan said. “It went flat for a little bit and then started nose-diving. It was so close we thought it was going to come into our house. When it came down, it made a big noise.”

Khan said when he got to the scene, the house was on fire.

The pilot and all four skydivers aboard the single-engine aircraft were able to parachute out of the plane safely.

That plane then struck the roof of a home, causing a huge fire.

We are told a man and woman were inside at home when the plane hit. Amazingly, they were able to make it out of the house safely and were not injured.

The pilot suffered minor burns and he's being treated at a local hospital.

Shortly after the crash, viewers started contacting us, reporting hearing a loud explosion and seeing a fireball falling from the sky.

By 9:30, Gilbert fire officials said they had the fire under control and were working to put out hot spots.

Gilbert police tweeted that the small plane was carrying skydivers for an annual Constitution Fair event.

"Please keep Ryan in your prayers, for physical and emotional healing, and joining us in thanking God for protecting his life," Colton Kilgore wrote on the gofundme page.

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.azfamily.com

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

That's it, just jump out, don't worry about anyone on the ground.

Anonymous said...

That's your comment? Really? You were flying in formation and saw first hand how the event transpired? You have experienced an in-flight fire personally? Did you miss the info about the pilot jumping later? Get a clue or don't bother posting.

Former Jump Pilot said...

I'm not going to assign blame about why the captain didn't go down trying to guide his ship to safety but I guarantee the lawyers and the FAA are going to be asking that very question. Jump planes are generally abused and suffer higher than normal rates of failure as a result. You see, jump planes are profit makers for the sky diving business. The more times they can turn and burn, the more money. The pilots often overload the planes out of GC, even on hot days (high density alt), climb to altitude as fast as possible (hot engine=high CHT) then after dropping loads they dive for the field (shock cooling the engine) so they can get back to fill up another group. Some (not all) skydiving establishments have shady maintenance not to mention those high time 182s and 206s you often see. Again, the lawyers/FAA will be combing the records.

Engine failure with fire on a hot day, fully loaded with humans. Most of us don't have the option of bailing out with a chute. I'm just happy that no one was killed. The results are not surprising at all.

Anonymous said...

N27QV = Pilot egressed from the glider and parachuted to the roof of a hospital.

http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2015/04/incident-occurred-april-05-2015-in.html