Sunday, May 8, 2016

Piper PA-28, N5046W: Accident occurred May 08, 2016 in Pomona, Los Angeles County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot estimated that he departed on the 10-minute, 16-mile, local flight with one fuel tank about one-half full and the other tank about one-quarter full; he did not recall which tank he had the fuel selector positioned to during takeoff. During descent for landing, the pilot observed the engine rpm decrease to between 500 and 600 rpm, at which time he declared an emergency. The pilot switched fuel tanks but did not remember which tank he selected or whether the engine lost total power. The pilot made a forced landing on the roof of an industrial office building.

During examination of the airplane after it was recovered from the roof of the building, about 7.5 gallons of fuel was drained from the left wing, and about 1 quart of fuel was drained from the right wing; no visible contamination was observed. Additionally, the fuel selector was selected to the right tank position. Other than the absence of fuel in the right tank, examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation. Further, the lack of rotational damage to the propeller was consistent with a loss of engine power before impact. While atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to carburetor ice, the physical evidence supports the position that total loss of engine power was due to fuel starvation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's mismanagement of the available fuel, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California 
Piper Aircraft, Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engine; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5046W




Pilot Don Bach


NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2016, about 1640 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28, N5046W, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing on top of an office/industrial building complex in Pomona, California. The private pilot, who was the registered owner and sole occupant of the airplane, sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the 16 nautical mile (nm) local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from the Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California, about 1630, and the intended destination was Brackett Field (POC), La Verne, California.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) about 6 weeks after the accident, the pilot reported that before departing on the 10-minute flight, he estimated that one fuel tank was about one-half full and the other fuel tank was about one-quarter full; he did not recall which tank contained what amount of fuel or which tank the fuel selector was positioned to use. The pilot stated that the pre-takeoff run up was "ok", and that the carburetor heat worked well. The pilot further stated that, after departing FUL, he climbed to 2,200 ft. mean sea level (msl), was cleared for a left downwind to runway 26L at POC, and contacted the POC tower over Diamond Bar, a small town just west of POC. He then descended to 2,000 ft. msl, and during the descent he observed the engine rpm decrease to between 500 and 600 rpm, at which time he radioed "MAYDAY, MAYDAY." The pilot stated that he then switched fuel tanks but was not sure which one he selected. He further stated that he was not sure if the engine had completely lost power or not. The pilot said that he was looking for a field to land in but could not find one. The pilot added that the only thing he saw was a rooftop, which he aimed for, and he subsequently "belly flopped" the airplane onto the roof of the building. The pilot concluded by saying that he did not remember when he had last refueled the airplane.

The building the airplane landed on was located about 2 nm southwest of the destination airport. An initial survey of the accident site was performed on the evening of May 8, 2016, by NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) investigators. The wreckage was located on the top of a building, which measured about 200 ft. in length, and about 100 ft. in width; the roof was about 30 ft. above ground level. The airplane came to rest nose down with the building's roof collapsed around the engine cowling to the top of the propeller spinner. The left main landing gear collapsed aft, and the left wheel separated and was found on the roof. The nose wheel separated and was found inside the building. Some blue staining was observed on the roof.

On the day after the accident, the wreckage was examined in more detail after it was lowered from the roof of the building. During the examination, investigators drained about 7.5 gallons of fluid from the left wing tank's fuel drain; it was a light blue fluid, which looked and smelled like aviation gasoline. There was no visible contamination. Additionally, investigators drained about 1 quart of fluid from the right wing tank's fuel drain; it was a light blue fluid, which looked and smelled like aviation gasoline. There was no visible contamination. Investigators also drained a few ounces of fluid from the carburetor; it was amber in color, and smelled like aviation gasoline. The gascolator was displaced from its position; the screen appeared clean. The fuel selector was observed positioned to the right fuel tank.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange, and the spinner remained attached to the propeller. One propeller blade was bent aft, and the other propeller blade did not appear to be bent. Neither blade displayed leading edge gouging or S-bending.

On June 14, 2016, a detailed examination of the engine and airframe, performed under the supervision of the NTSB IIC, revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the engine. For details of the examination, refer to the Summary of Airplane Examination report, which is available in the public docket for this accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 61, possessed an FAA private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot reported to the NTSB that he had a total flight time of 900 hours of which 300 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane. He also reported that he had accumulated a total of 5 hours flight time in the last 90 days and 2 hours in the last 30 days, all in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The pilot completed his most recent flight review on February 27, 2016. He was issued a third-class FAA airman medical certificate on December 4, 2015, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Piper PA-28, serial number 28-48. It was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a fixed tricycle landing gear.

Examination of the airplane's airframe logbook indicated that the airplane's last two annual inspections revealed several discrepancies, and the airplane was not signed off as airworthy. The annual inspection performed on October 4, 2014, at a tachometer time of 1,249.97 hours and 4,098.97 hours total time, revealed the following discrepancies: needs an engine data plate (missing); needs Right side exhaust shroud for carb heat replace; needs compass correction card entries legible/replaced. The most recent annual inspection, which was performed on November 1, 2015, at a tachometer time of 1,261.0 hours and 4,110.27 hours, revealed the following discrepancies: needs an engine data plate (missing); needs Right side exhaust shroud for carb heat replaced; needs engine front crankshaft seal replaced; left wing fuel sump drain weeping.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1547, the weather reporting facility at POC reported: wind from 260° at 8 knots, 10 miles visibility, overcast ceiling at 3,100 ft. above ground level, temperature 17° C, dew point 10° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. According to the carburetor icing probability chart, conditions were conducive to moderate icing at cruise power, and serious icing at descent power. The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with moderate icing at cruise power, and serious icing at descent power.






















NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2016, about 1630 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28, N5046W, sustained substantial damage after making a forced landing on top of an office/industrial building complex, about 2 nautical miles southwest of Brackett Field (POC), La Verne, California. The private pilot, who was the registered owner and sole occupant of the airplane, sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from the Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California, about 1600.

According to local law enforcement personnel, the pilot reported that while approaching POC at an altitude of about 2,000 feet, the engine experienced an initial power loss to about 1,000 rpm. The pilot stated that the mixture was in and that he had switched fuel tanks, however, he could not restore power to the engine. The pilot further stated that when he realized he would not be able to make it to his destination, he elected to make a forced landing. The pilot reported that rather than land in a residential area, he opted to land on the roof of a corporate building. After touching down, the airplane came to an abrupt stop upright and on the top of the building, with the engine partially imbedded into the roof.


The airplane was recovered to a secured storage facility for further examination.


BOYLE HEIGHTS, Calif. -- The pilot who made an amazing crash-landing on top of a Pomona, California, building, said Monday he was lucky, CBS Los Angeles reported.

Don Bach was transferred from Los Angeles County USC Medical Center in Boyle Heights to another hospital Monday night, one day after safely landing his single-engine Piper on the rooftop of a state parole office on Corporate Center Drive in Pomona.

The 61-year-old, who has 40 years of flying experience, suffered broken bones in his right arm and right leg as well scrapes.

He told CBS Los Angeles that he was getting ready to land when the engine started to fail.

"When I got down to about 50 knots, I knew it was going to stall, and I really only had one option," he said.

So he did what any experienced pilot would do in an emergency.

"The main thing I was concentrating on was not hitting power poles, not hitting any cars, not hitting any homes or anything," the pilot recalled.

"Then he called air traffic controller and tell him: 'May Day, May Day.' And he looked down, and he see the traffic, the freeway, housing. So he just tried to find a safe place to land," Bach's wife, Connie, said.

With little power, somehow Bach guided the plane to the top of the parole office building after avoiding homes, people and the nearby 10 and 57 freeways.

"Thank you Lord for putting the building there with a soft roof," Bach chuckled.

He crash-landed the plane so skillfully, the aircraft sat on the roof almost so perfectly between two beams that a building inspector said prevented the plane from collapsing the roof.

"There's many scenarios he could have been killed or worse damage or gone on to the freeways. So it was an incredible job what he did to get that plane down," said building inspector Mike Neely.

Because the building has been red-tagged, employees will work at a different location until inspectors determine how much damage was done, and when it is safe to enter.

Story and video:  http://www.cbsnews.com


Federal Aviation Administration officials are investigating the crash of a light plane that landed on the roof of a building in Pomona on Sunday. There were conflicting reports on the number of people aboard the aircraft.

"We believe the pilot was the only person on board," said FAA spokesman Ian Gregor. "He was transported to a hospital."

Gregor said the plane was a single-engine Piper PA-28 and was inbound to Brackett Field airport in LaVerne when the crash occurred.

The crash was reported at 4:42 p.m., and the plane landed on a building at 971 Corporate Center Drive, said Los Angeles County Fire Department spokeswoman Melanie Flores. Two people were walking around the plane when firefighters arrived on the scene, Flores said.

The building houses State of California offices.

Flores said the airport received a Mayday call from the pilot and there were reports of smoke coming from the plane. "He was having some kind of trouble," she said.

The airport is about a 3.5-mile drive from the crash site.

Television coverage showed Los Angeles County firefighters using a ladder to lower a person on a stretcher from the roof to an ambulance.

According to the FAA registry number on the plane, it is registered to Donald Bach and Connie Bach of Fullerton. It was not known whether either of them was aboard the plane.

Original article can be found here: http://www.scpr.org


POMONA >> A small airplane crashed or made a hard landing on the roof of a state parole building in Pomona Sunday afternoon, officials said. 

The incident was first reported about 4:45 p.m. in the 900 block of Corporate Center Drive, southwest of the junction of the 10, 57 and 71 freeways, according to Los Angeles County Fire Department and California Highway Patrol officials.

After responding to reports of a small airplane in trouble, officials found the craft atop a large building, Los Angeles County Fire Department Dispatch Supervisor Melanie Flores said. There was no initial reports of major injuries.

“A single-engine Piper PA-28 crashed under unknown circumstances near Kellogg Hill Road and the 71 (Freeway),” Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

One of two people aboard the airplane, believed to be the pilot, was flown by helicopter to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center for treatment, Flores said. The second occupant was not taken to a hospital.

Both pilot and passenger managed to walk away from the damaged airplane, Flores said.

The building the airplane landed on top of was a state parole building run by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, CHP Officer Alex Rubio said.

The plane was headed to Brackett Field Airport in La Verne, Gregor said. It was not immediately clear where the plane had departed from.

CHP logs indicated the airport lost radio contact with the airplane just before the crash site was found.

Further details were not immediately available.

The aircraft is registered to an owner in Fullerton, according to FAA records. The plane was manufactured in 1961 and had a valid, standard-classification flight status.


Original article can be found here: http://www.sgvtribune.com



POMONA, California -- Firefighters say a plane with two people on board has crash landed on the top of a building in Pomona, California, CBS Los Angeles reported.

FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said the single-engine Piper PA-28 went down under unknown circumstances Sunday afternoon and ended up on top of a commercial building in Pomona, east of Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles County Fire Department said one person was being transported to the hospital, while a second person was being evaluated.

The extent of their injuries is not known.

The fire department says a call came out at 4:40 p.m. Sunday that a plane landed on the roof of a building at 901 Corporate Center Drive in Pomona.

Gregor said the plane was heading to Brackett Field Airport in the nearby city of La Verne when it crashed.

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbsnews.com

A small plane landed on the roof of a building in a Pomona office park late Sunday afternoon, prompting a multi-agency response from emergency personnel, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire Department said.

The California Highway Patrol responded to the interchange of the 10, 57 and 71 freeways after receiving initial reports of a downed aircraft, Officer Alex Rubio said.

A Fire Department supervisor said the plane did not crash, adding that the building was on Corporate Center Drive, just south of the 10 Freeway.

Two patients were brought down from the roof by aerial ladder; one of them was transported to a hospital by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department helicopter team, according to officials.

The airlifted patient was the pilot of the small plane, the Sheriff’s Department said on Twitter.

The nature of the patients’ possible injuries and their conditions were not immediately known.

Original article can be found here: http://ktla.com

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