Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Buckeye Dream Machine, N2564A: Accident occurred April 23, 2016 in Culver, Marshall County, Indiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N2564A

NTSB Identification: GAA16LA199
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 23, 2016 in Culver, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/16/2016
Aircraft: BUCKEYE INDUSTRIES DREAM MACHINE, registration: N2564A
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The noncertificated pilot was conducting a local personal flight in the powered-parachute, which he had purchased about 3 days before the accident flight. The pilot reported that, during his second attempt to take off from a grass field, he tried to avoid a tree by using the right rudder pedal, but the powered-parachute drifted left and impacted the tree, which resulted in substantial damage to the envelope.
The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. He further reported that he did not hold any flight certificates and had not received any flight instruction in the powered-parachute before the accident flight nor that he aware that he was required to do so. It is likely that the noncertificated pilot did not fully understand how to operate the powered-parachute, which led to his failure attain a climb and the subsequent impact with a tree.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The noncertificated pilot’s failure to attain a climb in the powered-parachute and its subsequent impact with a tree. 

On April 23, 2016 about 1730 central daylight time (CDT), a Buckeye Industries, Dream Machine powered parachute, N2564A, impacted a tree shortly after takeoff from a private field about 2.5 miles southeast of Culver, Indiana. The solo non-certificated pilot sustained serious injuries. The powered parachute sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The powered parachute was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR), personal local flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, no flight plan was filed. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Inspector who responded to the accident, the pilot did not hold any flight certificates and has not had any previous flight instruction. He further reported that the powered parachute had been purchased about three days prior to the accident flight. The pilot told the inspector that he was unaware that he needed flight training or a flight certificate to fly the powered parachute. 

The pilot reported that on his second attempt to take off from a grass field, he attempted to avoid a tree by using the right rudder pedal, but the powered parachute drifted left and impacted a tree. 

The powered parachute sustained substantial damage to the envelope. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.


The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Powered Parachute Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-29 (2007). This handbook discusses the pilot certificate eligibility requirements and states in part: You may not act as pilot in command (PIC) of a light-sport aircraft powered parachute unless you hold a pilot certificate with a powered parachute rating issued by the FAA.

No comments: