Tuesday, April 26, 2016

AK Ridge Runner, N1549M: Accident occurred April 23, 2016 at Lincoln Village Airpark (89AK), Wasilla, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.
 
Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Final Report
- National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N1549M

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA021
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 23, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: JIM RIGGS AK RIDGE RUNNER, registration: N1549M
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The light sport pilot was departing uphill from a 2,000-ft-long by 200-ft-wide gravel-covered runway, which was surrounded by trees. He said that, as the airplane approached midfield, it became airborne and the engine “sputtered,” so he elected to abort the takeoff. After the airplane touched down, he was unable to stop it before striking a stand of trees at the end of the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. A maintenance technician’s postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. An aviation weather reporting station located 2 miles southeast of the accident site reported weather conditions about the time of the accident that were conducive for light to moderate carburetor icing at any engine power setting; however, the investigation could not determine whether carburetor icing caused the loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

On April 23, 2016, about 1445 Alaska daylight time, an amateur built, light sport, experimental AK Ridge Runner airplane, N1549M, sustained substantial damage during an aborted takeoff following a partial loss of engine power from Lincoln Village Airpark, Wasilla, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, when the accident occurred. The light sport pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on April 25, the pilot said that he was departing, uphill, from a 2,000-foot-long by 200-foot-wide gravel runway, which was surrounded by trees. He said that during the takeoff run, as the airplane approached midfield, it became airborne and the engine "sputtered" so he elected to abort the takeoff. He explained that after the airplane touched down again, he was unable to get the airplane stopped before striking a stand of trees at the end of the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors, O-200 series engine.

During a follow-up telephone interview with the NTSB IIC on July 8, the accident pilot reported he and his maintenance technician's postaccident inspection of the airplane revealed no mechanical problems that would have precluded normal operations. He said that on the day of the accident, just before takeoff, he taxied the airplane to the end of the runway with the carburetor heat in the off position. When he reached the end of the runway, he momentarily applied carburetor heat, and then turned it off just before applying takeoff power. He added that loss of engine power was likely was due to carburetor icing.

The closest weather reporting facility was the Wasilla Airport, about 5 miles south of the accident site. The 1416 weather observation from the Wasilla Airport was reporting, in part: Wind 180 degrees (true) at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, 8,500 overcast; temperature, 59 degrees F; dew point 32 degrees F; altimeter 29.61 inHg.

According to a carburetor icing probability chart, the conditions at the time of the accident were conducive for light to moderate carburetor icing at any engine power setting.

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A pilot avoided injury in Wasilla over the weekend, after a mechanical mishap.

Alaska Wildlife Troopers were notified of an aircraft accident just before 3 p.m. Saturday at an airstrip near the intersection of Johnson Road and Schulz Road in Wasilla.

The pilot, James Riggs, reportedly lost power just as his plane lifted off.

He says the plane settled back onto the ground before rolling off the end of the runway, into heavy brush and debris.

Riggs was uninjured, but the aircraft did sustain damage.

Original article can be found here: http://www.alaskapublic.org

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