Thursday, March 31, 2016

Cessna 180D Skywagon, N180XV, TumiAir Inc: Accident occurred March 31, 2016 at Shiprock Airstrip (5V5), San Juan County, New Mexico

TUMIAIR INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N180XV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 31, 2016 in Shiprock, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/16/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180D, registration: N180XV
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. The pilot reported that, during the landing roll, shortly after he had completed a three-point landing, a left quartering tailwind gust caused the tailwheel-equipped airplane to veer to the right. The pilot was unable to regain directional control before the airplane departed the right side of the runway into a drainage ditch. The right main landing gear collapsed during the runway excursion, and the airplane subsequently nosed over. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The pilot stated that, about 25 minutes before landing, he obtained the current weather conditions from the closest aviation weather station, which was located about 23 miles from the destination airport, and that the reported surface wind was from 200 degrees at 4 knots. A postaccident review of available weather data established that the surface wind was likely variable in direction at 5 knots. Although the surface wind was considered light and variable, a sudden change in wind direction shortly after touchdown likely contributed to the pilot's loss of directional control during the landing roll.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control after encountering a sudden change in wind direction during the landing roll.

On March 31, 2016, about 1145 mountain daylight time, a Cessna model 180D single-engine airplane, N180XV, was substantially damaged while landing at Shiprock Airstrip (5V5), near Shiprock, New Mexico. The airline transport pilot sustained serious injuries. The passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by TumiAir, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight that had departed from Durango-La Plata County Airport (DRO), Durango, Colorado, about 1100.

The pilot reported that while enroute he obtained the current weather conditions at Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), Farmington, New Mexico. According to the pilot, at 1120, the surface wind at FMN was 200 degrees at 4 knots. Upon reaching 5V5, the pilot completed an overflight of airport before entering a left traffic pattern for runway 20 (4,840 feet by 75 feet, asphalt). The pilot made a normal three-point landing, at about 50 miles per hour, with the wing flaps extended to 30 degrees. The pilot reported that shortly after touchdown a left quartering tailwind gust caused the airplane to veer to the right. The pilot stated that he was unable to regain directional control before the airplane departed the right side of the runway into a drainage ditch. The right main landing gear collapsed during the runway excursion and the airplane subsequently nosed over. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The fuselage, vertical stabilizer, and rudder sustained substantial damage during the accident.

The closest aviation weather station was located at Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), Farmington, New Mexico, about 23 miles east-northeast of the accident site. At 1153, the FMN automated surface observing system reported: a variable surface wind direction at 5 knots, surface visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 7 degrees Celsius, dew point -7 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.89 inches of mercury. The weather station's previous hourly report, issued at 1053, indicated that the surface wind had been light-and-variable.


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 31, 2016 in Shiprock, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 180D, registration: N180XV
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 31, 2016, about 1145 mountain daylight time, a Cessna model 180D single-engine airplane, N180XV, was substantially damaged while landing at Shiprock Airstrip (5V5), near Shiprock, New Mexico. The airline transport pilot sustained serious injuries. The passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by TumiAir, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight that had departed from Durango-La Plata County Airport (DRO), Durango, Colorado, about 1100.

The pilot reported that while enroute he obtained the current weather conditions at Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), Farmington, New Mexico. According to the pilot, at 1120, the surface wind at FMN was 200 degrees at 4 knots. Upon reaching 5V5, the pilot completed an overflight of airport before entering a left traffic pattern for runway 20 (4,840 feet by 75 feet, asphalt). The pilot made a normal three-point landing, at about 50 miles per hour, with the wing flaps extended to 30 degrees. The pilot reported that shortly after touchdown a left quartering tailwind gust caused the airplane to veer to the right. The pilot stated that he was unable to regain directional control before the airplane departed the right side of the runway into a drainage ditch. The right main landing gear collapsed during the runway excursion and the airplane subsequently nosed over. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The fuselage, vertical stabilizer, and rudder sustained substantial damage during the accident.

The closest aviation weather station was located at Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), Farmington, New Mexico, about 23 miles east-northeast of the accident site. At 1153, the FMN automated surface observing system reported: a variable surface wind direction at 5 knots, surface visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 7 degrees Celsius, dew point -7 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.89 inches of mercury. The weather station's previous hourly report, issued at 1053, indicated that the surface wind had been light-and-variable.


Ryan Arroyo, a passenger in a Cessna 180D Skywagon plane that overturned Thursday at the Shiprock Airstrip, stands near the plane. The pilot was taken to the hospital after the incident. 


FARMINGTON — Joe Tumminaro — the pilot injured in Thursday's Cessna 180D Skywagon plane crash at the Shiprock Airstrip — remained in serious condition Friday afternoon, according to San Juan Regional Medical Center spokeswoman Laura Werbner.

Meanwhile, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Friday that the federal agency was notified of the crash and has started an investigation.

"The NTSB investigator determined he did not need to go to the scene," spokesman Chris O'Neil said. "He is doing what's called a desk investigation."

O'Neil said a final report will be released once the investigation is complete.

Tumminaro, a licensed airline transport pilot, was practicing a "touch and go" landing procedure in a Cessna 180D Skywagon when a gust of wind flipped the aircraft onto the paved airstrip, according to a Navajo Police Department press release.

Tumminaro, 67, was transported by helicopter to San Juan Regional Medical Center, the release states. A passenger, Ryan Arroyo, did not report injuries, but he was also transported to the Farmington hospital.

Werbner said Friday that Arroyo, 33, is no longer at the hospital.

Arroyo said in an interview Thursday the two men departed from their hometown of Durango, Colo.,  that morning on a sightseeing trip.

Navajo Division of Transportation spokesman Carl Slater said Friday that a review of records indicated there had never before been a crash at the Shiprock Airstrip. Slater said the airstrip reopened on Friday.

New Mexico State Police is continuing to investigate the crash, according to press release issued Friday.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.daily-times.com




SHIPROCK — The condition of a pilot who was injured in a propeller plane crash today at the Shiprock Airstrip was still unknown in the afternoon.

Ryan Arroyo, 33, a passenger in the plane, said strong winds overturned the aircraft during landing. The pilot, Joe Tumminaro, was transported by helicopter to San Juan Regional Medical Center in Farmington, according to Arroyo.

Hospital spokeswoman Laura Werbner said shortly before 4 p.m. that Tumminaro's condition was not yet known.

Arroyo did not suffer any apparent injuries.

Arroyo said the two men, both from Durango, Colo., departed from Durango at about 10:30 a.m. on a sightseeing trip.

They landed at the Shiprock Airstrip, and the crash was reported at 11:46 a.m., according to police dispatch. The airstrip is about eight miles south of Shiprock.

“It was a normal landing, but the wind caught (the plane),” Arroyo said.

Tumminaro is a certified airman, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. In January 2015, he obtained an airline transport pilot license, the highest level of aircraft pilot license, records state.

New Mexico State Police spokesman Sgt. Chad Pierce said a preliminary investigation indicated the plane had fully landed when winds pushed it off the runway. The plane sat upside down today in a grassy median between runways at the airstrip. A wheel and the pilot-side door were crumpled and had broken apart from the wrecked plane.

Wind today at Four Corners Regional Airport in Farmington was recorded at speeds of 20 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service.

Pierce said police planned to contact officials with the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board to see if the agencies will investigate the incident.

The Shiprock Airstrip was closed today due to the crash, according to a press release from the Navajo Department of Transportation. Shiprock Airstrip is one of six airports on the reservation and is listed in the FAA's facility directory. It is 4,840 feet long and 75 feet wide, according to Daily Times archives.

The Navajo DOT has previously proposed upgrades to the aging airport, including improvements to the runway's markings and pavement, according to archives. The pavement condition was listed in a 2014 report as fair to poor with surface cracks found on a majority of the runway, archives state.


Navajo DOT spokesman Carl Slater said today's crash was the first to occur in several years at the airstrip.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.daily-times.com









A small plane crashed about 8 miles south of Shiprock just before noon Thursday, injuring the pilot.

There were two people in the plane, which was seen upside down in a field south of the city. 

One person, the pilot, was airlifted to the San Juan Regional Medical Center with back pain and the passenger walked away and was treated at the scene.

New Mexico State Police said the plane was landing at the Shiprock Airstrip when it got caught in a crosswind and was pushed off the runway. 

The plane caught an edge and flipped.

The plane, a Cessna 180D, is registered to a company out of Durango, Colorado.

NTSB and the FAA have been notified of the crash, but state police say they are unsure if either agency will respond since the plane was on taxi approach.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kob.com

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