Saturday, February 14, 2015

Cessna 150M, Aero Services LLC, N827CH: Accident occurred February 14, 2015 in Layton, Utah

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 14, 2015 in Layton, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M, registration: N827CH
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the airplane departed with about 8 gallons of fuel on board for a cross-country flight. While the airplane was en route and about 1,200 ft above ground level, the engine lost power. The pilot then completed the emergency procedures to restore power without success. The pilot chose to make an emergency landing on a golf course. During the landing sequence, the pilot intentionally impacted a tree with the airplane's right wing to reduce forward speed, after which the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted. The pilot reported that, due to a headwind that the airplane encountered en route, there was insufficient fuel to reach his destination airport. 

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would precluded normal operation. It is likely that the engine lost power due to fuel exhaustion because the pilot did not account for an increased headwind.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion, which resulted from the pilot’s inadequate preflight and in-flight fuel planning, which did not account for the increased headwind.

On February 14, 2015, about 1020 mountain standard time, a Cessna 150M, N827CH, was substantially damaged following loss of engine power, which resulted in a forced landing and impact with terrain near Layton, Utah. The private pilot was not injured, while the sole passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Aero Services LLC, Centerville, Utah. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal cross-country flight, which was operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Logan-Cache Airport (LGU), Logan, Utah, about 0940, with the planned destination being Sky Park Airport (BTF), Bountiful, Utah.

In a statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that about 15 miles north of BTF the engine rpm started dropping off from 2,400 rpm, and the airspeed was decreasing from 80 mph. The pilot stated that he then began using emergency procedures to restore engine rpm; rich mixture, added carburetor heat, and pumped the throttle lever, but he was not able to restore engine power. The pilot then elected to make an emergency landing to a golf course. During the approach and landing sequence the pilot intentionally impacted a tree with the airplane's right wing to reduce speed. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted in a sand trap on the golf course.

In a statement submitted to the NTSB IIC, the owner of the airplane reported that in a voice mail that was left for him by the accident pilot, the pilot stated that he had departed LGU for BTF, and that he had dipped the tanks, which indicated 8 gallons total for the flight. The accident pilot further stated that there were headwinds that day, and the fuel he had onboard was not enough to make it back [to BTF].

Under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector, an examination of the airframe was performed by a Textron Aviation Senior Air Safety Investigator on February 17, 2015. The results of the examination revealed no anomalies with the airframe, inclusive of the airplane's fuel system, that would have precluded normal operation. (Refer to the Summary of Airframe Examination, which is appended to the docket for this report.)

Under the supervision of a FAA aviation safety inspector, on December 1, 2015, an examination of the engine was performed by a licensed FAA airframe and powerplant mechanic. As a result of the examination, the mechanic reported that engine compression was checked by turning the propeller by hand, as well as valve train continuity, with no anomalies reported. Additionally, the ignition system was inspected and tested. Solid blue spark was observed on all 8 ignition leads, and the magneto timing was found to be set to the manufacturer's specifications. The mechanic observed that all spark plugs were examined and appeared to be in nearly new condition, with some normal carbon deposits observed below the electrodes, but none across the electrodes. Examination of the carburetor revealed that the finger screen was clean with no debris noted, and that the needle and seat were observed without any faults detected. Further, there was no accumulation of any sediment or corrosion in the bottom of the float bowl. Additionally, an inspection of the oil filter revealed no metal or abnormal indications observed. The mechanic reported no anomalies with the engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 14, 2015 in Layton, UT
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M, registration: N827CH
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On February 14, 2015, about 1020 mountain standard time, a Cessna 150M, N827CH, was substantially damaged following a forced landing and impact with terrain near Layton, Utah. The certified private pilot was not injured, while the sole passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to Aero Services LLC, Centerville, Utah, and operated by Bountiful Flight, Woods Cross, Utah. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal cross-country flight, which was operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Logan-Cache Airport (LUG), Logan, Utah, with the planned destination being Sky Park Airport (BTF), Bountiful, Utah.


In a statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that about 15 miles north of BTF the engine rpm started dropping off from 2,400 rpm, and the airspeed was decreasing from 80 mph. The pilot stated that he then began using emergency procedures to restore engine rpm; rich mixture, add carburetor heat, and pump throttle lever, but he was not able to restore engine power. The pilot then elected to make an emergency landing to a golf course. During the approach and landing sequence the pilot intentionally impacted a tree with the airplane's right wing to reduce speed. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted in a sand trap on the golf course.


The airplane was recovered to a secured storage facility for further examination.  

AERO SERVICES: http://registry.faa.gov/N827CH

LAYTON — Out of all the places to be on a beautiful Saturday morning, Dustin Volk wishes he wasn't inside. 

Volk is the golf pro at Valley View Golf Course, 2501 E. Gentile Street. Being inside handling operations and paperwork is part of his normal, everyday job. But at about 10:30 a.m., "normal" stopped.

"Customers just came running in and said a plane crashed on the practice green," Volk said.

He went outside, saw a small airplane upside down near a sand bunker on the practice chipping green, and ran to see if those inside were OK.

"The one guy we helped get out, the passenger, he seemed to be pretty OK. The pilot was a little bit more in pain and kind of pinned," Volk said. "He had blood coming from his head. We got him unbuckled and waited for the ambulance."

Emergency crews with the Layton Fire Department took the passenger to the hospital in fair condition. The pilot was treated at the scene, released, and explained to emergency crews what happened.

"They left the Woods Cross airport this morning and flew to Logan. They had breakfast there and then started flying back," said Doug Bitton, with the Layton Fire Department. "Around 5,000 feet, they experienced difficulty."

For some reason, the engine stopped working. A witness hiking near Weber Canyon told crews he heard the plane sputtering.

Witnesses at the golf course said they didn't hear anything until the plane clipped trees near the driving range and crashed.

"So far, what we can tell is that it wasn't a mechanical problem. Our airplanes are sound, They're fine. It was most likely pilot error," said Jason Clark, who owns Bountiful Flight — the company that owns the single engine Cessna plane that crashed.

Clark said he rented the plane to the pilot, did a pre-check on it, and wants people to know the crash had nothing to do with his flight school or his flight instructors.

"We've never had an accident in the past. We never had an incident of any kind. We do more inspections on these airplanes than are even required for the FAA. We go over and above what we need to do to make sure these airplanes are safe," Clark said.

He thinks the plane ran out of gas, but he's waiting for the investigation to know for sure.

No matter what happened, though, it's amazing nobody was seriously hurt; those inside the plane and outside.

"It could have been really bad. One customer said just 5 minutes earlier, he was in the bunker hitting shots out to the chipping green," Volk said.

The FAA and the NTSB were handling the investigation Saturday. 

http://www.ksl.com


LAYTON — A small plane crashed at Valley View Golf Course on Saturday, sending at least one occupant to the hospital.

He was in fair condition at McKay-Dee Hospital Center.

The pilot was treated and released on scene with minor injuries, according to Layton police.

National Transportation Safety Board officials said they didn't know what caused the crash, but they have ordered the plane to be retrieved for investigation.

The plane, a small, single-engine Cessna, was rented in Bountiful, took off from the Bountiful Skypark Airport on Saturday morning and landed in Logan.

After the crew of two men had breakfast, they departed Logan and headed back to Bountiful when they crashed at the Layton golf course, 2501 E. Gentile. The plane landed upside-down near a sand trap on the course.

The names of the crew were not released Saturday.

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LAYTON — Two men suffered just minor injuries when their plane crashed into a golf course Saturday morning.

The plane — which has been identified by Layton city as a single-engine Cessna — went down at the Valley View Golf Course at 2501 E. Gentile Street just after 10 a.m.

Both the pilot and his male passenger made it out of the aircraft with minor injuries, according to Layton police. The pilot was released at the scene, while the other man was taken to McKay Dee Hospital in fair condition, police said.

The men were flying the plane — which was a rental — from Logan to Woods Cross at the time of the crash, police said. NTSB officials have ordered the owners to recover the Cessna for investigators, according to Layton city officials.

More information will be posted as it becomes available.

 LAYTON, Utah — Two people were extricated from a single-engine Cessna airplane after it crashed on a Layton golf course Saturday morning.

According to Layton City tweets, the crash occurred at Valley View Golf Course, 2501 E. Gentile Street.

The condition of the occupants in the aircraft is unknown at this time.

A FOX 13 News crew is on scene. More information will be provided as it becomes available.


















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