Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Cessna U206F Stationair, N206KL, Wilderness Aircraft I LLC: Accident occurred November 06, 2013 in Donnelly, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA044 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 06, 2013 in Donnelly, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA U206F, registration: N206KL
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 6, 2013 about 0910 mountain standard time, a Cessna U206F, N206KL, impacted terrain about 12 miles east of Donnelly, Idaho. The commercial pilot and two passengers were fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Wilderness Aircraft I LLC and operated by McCall Aviation Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company flight plan. The flight originated from McCall Municipal Airport (MYL), McCall, Idaho, at 0900 with a destination of Lower Loon Creek Airport (C53), Challis, Idaho. 

The accident airplane was one of three airplanes taking off from MYL destined for C53. The pilot's from the other two airplanes reported that prior to the flight all three pilots checked the weather and looked at weather webcams positioned throughout the passes. They also contacted people both on the ground and flying to get their description of the weather. The accident pilot departed MYL first followed by the two other airplanes. The second and third pilots both took a route to the north that is commonly used when the weather isn't considered perfect. The accident pilot chose a different route to the south, which isn't abnormal; however, he never told anyone why he chose that particular route. At the start of the flight the three pilots were talking to each other over the radio. The accident pilot reported over the radio that the first route he attempted to take was blocked in, so he turned around and flew further south. The last radio transmission they heard from the accident pilot was that he was clear in the south fork of the Salmon River. 

A portable GPS unit was removed from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) vehicle recorders laboratory for download. The GPS track showed that the airplane departed MYL to the southeast before it turned east towards the mountains. The track entered the mountains, then proceeded south temporarily along a valley before it flew west and exited mountains. The track continued south along the mountain ridgeline for a short time before it turned east and reentered the mountains. The track turned northeast temporarily before it turned southeast then southwest. The end of the track showed the airplane entered what appeared to be a horseshoe shaped ridgeline from over the eastern ridge at 8,150 feet going 128 knots; it then flew along the southern edge of the ridge at about 145 knots. As the airplane approached the western ridge, the airspeed decreased to 71 knots then increased to 89 knots with no noted change in altitude. The track turned north along the western ridge; the final data point indicated the airplane was at 8,150 feet with a groundspeed of 152 knots. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

At the time of the accident, the pilot, age 66, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single- and multi- engine land privileges and an instrument rating, which was issued on December 15, 2007. His most recent second class medical was issued on December 18, 2012 with no limitations or waivers noted. The pilot was hired at McCall Aviation in May 2008 and flew all seasons since then. The pilot's most recent proficiency check occurred on July 29, 2013 for single-engine airplane. As of September 13, 2013, the pilot reported to the operator that he had 3,841 hours total time, 2,158 of which were in the accident airplane make and model. This was the pilot's first flight after having a day off. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 

The accident airplane, a Cessna U206F, serial number U20602655, was manufactured in 1975 and was equipped with a Continental IO-550F engine. The airplane's most recent maintenance was completed on October 23, 2013 at a total time of 16,501.4 hours; which included the replacement of the alternator belt and the installation of bolts, springs, and washers to the left exhaust stack. On October 3, 2013, at a total time of 16,493.00 hours, the airplane was examined in accordance with its phase check maintenance schedule. On September 30, 2013, at a total time of 16,489.10 hours, a new bladder fuel tank was installed in the right wing. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting facility, MYL, was located about 14 miles to the northwest of the accident sight. At 0851, weather was reported as calm wind, 9 statute miles of visibility, few clouds at 300 feet above ground level (agl), broken clouds at 2,500 feet agl, and overcast clouds at 3,200 feet agl. The temperature was -1 degrees C, and dewpoint was -2 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.29 inches of mercury.

The other two pilots reported that the weather was not perfect. The valley where MYL is located was good and started to clear to a broken overcast. The weather along their particular route was marginal the entire way, clouds hung low in various locations; however, it became clearer as they neared C53. At no point did they have to divert from their path because of the weather. 

Due to the location of the accident site, weather reporting stations and weather products are limited. Satellite imagery was unable to show low level clouds because of a mid-level cloud layer at 15,000 feet. With lack of ground instrumentation in the accident area other weather sources were unable to show cloud conditions. There were AIRMETS for IFR and MTN Obscuration, however, there are no indications that those conditions were occurring near the accident site. 

A weather model and algorithm were used to simulate and approximate the weather conditions in the area of the accident site. A weather model that simulated relative humidity over the accident site was ran and revealed that the lower altitudes above terrain likely had a much lower visibility with relative humidity greater than 98%. An algorithm that uses satellite, radar, surface, and pilot reports to calculate the probability of icing was used; the algorithm revealed "light" to "moderate" severity icing threat, with a high probability of that threat. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT

The airplane came to rest about 100 feet from the top on the western most ridgeline of a horseshoe shaped ridge. The airplane came to rest on the inside of the horseshoe, with the heading of the airplane consistent with the opening of the horseshoe. The terrain was steep, and was heavily covered with trees and about two and a half feet of snow, some of which was fresh. The first identified piece of debris was the inboard portion of the right elevator. It was found about 20 feet to the south of the main wreckage at the base of a small tree that did not appear to be topped. In between the first identified point of debris and the main wreckage were several topped trees. The airplane came to rest at the bottom of, and in between, two trees with a heading of about 299 degrees. One of those two trees sustained about 10 feet of scratching and scoring extending from the base of the tree; the airplane came to rest in a horseshoe shape around this tree. The tree severed the fuselage just aft of the cabin area; the engine, forward fuselage, cabin, and left wing came to rest on the northeast side of the tree and the aft fuselage and empennage came to rest on the northwest side of the tree. 

The forward fuselage and cabin area came to rest upright, however, angled about 45 degrees onto its right side. The forward fuselage was heavily damaged. The engine was still intact and mostly buried in the snow; one of the magnetos had separated and came to rest about 3 feet in front of the engine. The cabin area sustained forward crushing, and the instrument panel was heavily damaged. The connection point for the left seat control yoke was visible and all cables were still attached. The left wing was mostly separated from its attachment points; it was twisted upside down and came to rest on top of the fuselage, extending out over the right side of the airplane. An approximate 4 foot tall section of an approximate 10-inch diameter tree was lodged in the trailing edge of the left wing. The right wing was completely separated from the wing root and the inboard portion of the wing was located at the base of the tree and main wreckage. The inboard right wing was completely covered in snow and ice; heavy organic debris was noted at the outboard fracture point. The outboard portion of the right wing was not located. The empennage sustained heavy crush damage throughout. The vertical stabilizer and rudder were accordion crushed forward. The left horizontal stabilizer was separated from the empennage and located about 10 feet to the west of the empennage. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on November 9, 2013, by the Valley County coroner's office, McCall, Idaho. The autopsy indicated the pilot's cause of death was severe blunt force trauma. 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot with negative results for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and tested for drugs. Ethanol was detected in various concentrations: 22 mg/dL detected in the liver, 100 mg/dL detected in muscle, 30 mg/dL detected in the heart, and 12 mg/dL detected in the lung. N-Propanol was also detected in the liver. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

During a postaccident airframe and engine examination that included representatives from the NTSB, FAA, Textron Aviation – Cessna Aircraft company, Continental Motors, and McCall Aviation did not reveal any anomalies with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operations. 

Airframe Examination

An airframe examination revealed that all of the airplane's components were present; with the exception of the outboard portion of the right wing, which was not found on scene. Flight control continuity was established throughout. All of the breaks in the cables were either consistent with tension overload, or cut by the recovery crew. The flap jackscrew was examined and the flaps were in the retracted position. The elevator trim position indicator was severely damaged, and the position could not be determined. The fuel selector valve was found and was positioned on the right fuel tank. The inside of the right fuel bladder was mostly clear with the exception of some small particles. 

The propeller hub was fractured and separated from the propeller flange, and the blades were separated from the propeller hub. None of the blades sustained leading impact damage. One blade was bent forward about 10 degrees midspan in a small radius bend, and chordwise scoring was present on the cambered side of the blade. The outboard six inches of the second blade was twisted about 20 degrees with the leading edge being twisted aft. The third blade was bent aft about 10 degrees in a large radius bend starting 10 inches from the hub. The outboard seven inches were bent aft about 45 degrees in a small radius bend. 

Engine Examination

The engine remained attached to the firewall by the fuel lines and control cables; there was no evidence of catastrophic failure. Both magnetos were separated from their attachment points. The magnetos were manually rotated and the right magneto sparked on all six magneto towers; however, the left magneto only sparked on three of the six towers. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited "normal" wear signatures when compared to the Champion Spark Plugs "Check-A-Plug" Chart AV-27. The gascolator was removed from the firewall; the screen was clear with the exception of a small amount of pinkish-gray lint. The engine driven fuel pump remained attached to the engine; once removed it rotated freely with no anomalies or binding. The throttle body/fuel metering unit was fractured and deformed. The throttle plate was found in the full open position, and the throttle and mixture controls remained attached to their levers. The fuel inlet screen was removed and it was covered in pinkish-gray lint; light could be seen through the debris. The oil pump and oil filter were removed and disassembled; no anomalies were noted. The crankcase sustained impact-related damage and the number 5 cylinder was displaced outward from its attachment point. All cylinders were removed from the crankcase and showed no signs of distress or oil starvation to the cylinder barrels, cylinder heads, pistons, valves, valve springs, or rocker arms. The starter adapter needle bearing boss displayed a witness mark that was consistent with crankshaft gear teeth. The crankshaft was visibly distorted to the left side of the engine, which inhibited rotation of the engine. The crankshaft was removed from within the crankcase and there was no evidence of oil starvation or operational distress. The camshaft remained intact, but was bent; neither the camshaft, nor cam lifters displayed signs of corrosion, excessive wear, or rubbing. 

Magneto Examination

The left magneto was taken to Aircraft Magneto Services located on Bainbridge Island, Washington for further examination. The magneto was installed onto a test bench and was operated; one out of the six terminals sparked. The magneto was removed from the test bench and disassembled; it was noted that the distributer block-rotor-screws were bent aft. It was also noted that the rotor gear was fractured in half in what appeared to be overload. 

Fuel Metering Unit Examination – NTSB Materials Laboratory

The fuel metering unit was sent to the NTSB Materials laboratory for an examination of the debris found on the inlet screen. The debris was removed and collected; using a spectrometer to process infrared wavelength absorbance spectra of each sample of debris. The gray material was a strong match to dimethylsiloxane. Siloxanes (silicones) are used in lubricants, fire sleeving, and sealants. The red fiber was a strong match to cellulose, which is found in natural fibers such as wool and cotton.

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA044 
 Scheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 06, 2013 in Donnelly, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA U206F, registration: N206KL
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 6, 2013 about 0910 mountain standard time, a Cessna 206, N206KL, impacted terrain about 10 miles east of Donnelly, Idaho. The commercial pilot and two passengers were fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to Wilderness Aircraft I LLC and operated by McCall Aviation Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a charter flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on a company flight plan. The flight originated from McCall Municipal Airport (MYL), McCall, Idaho, at 0900 with a destination of Lower Loon Creek Airport (C53), Challis, Idaho.

The airplane was the subject of an Alert Notice (ALNOT) when the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center received notification of an activated emergency locator transmitter (ELT) southwest of MYL. Weather initially hindered the search and rescue operations. The airplane was located on November 8, 2013, at an elevation of about 8,000 feet mean sea level on steep, densely wooded, and snowy terrain.

The nearest weather reporting facility, MYL, was located about 14 miles to the northwest of the accident sight. At 1551, on November 6, weather was reported as calm wind, 9 statute miles of visibility, few clouds at 300 feet above ground level (agl), broken clouds at 2,500 feet agl, and overcast clouds at 3,200 feet agl. The temperature was -1 degrees C, and dew point was -2 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.29 inches of mercury.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.




 

 DONNELLY – Just after noon Friday, search crews found the wreckage of the plane they'd been searching for since Wednesday. 
 
Lt. Dan Smith with the Valley County Sheriff's Office says they have confirmed three people on board are dead. The pilot was Dan Wilson from McCall, and the passengers were Mike Wolf and Steve Hall, both from Washington.

Wolf is 51 years old from Woodland, Washington. Hall is around the same age and is from Ariel, Washington.

Smith tells KTVB the bodies were found in the wreckage on a steep section on the side of a mountain.

Sgt. Jason Speer with the Valley County Sheriff's Office said the men were in Idaho for a hunting trip. Speer told KTVB that they contracted the plane through McCall Aviation. They were heading to a hunting camp on the Middle Fork River.

Speer said the terrain was extremely difficult to get to, about 12 miles east of Donnelly near the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The search was stopped on Thursday because of severe weather, but on Friday, two helicopters with the Idaho Army National Guard were sent to the area, and the wreckage was spotted.

"They were able to lower down a medic into the area and discovered the plane wreckage and discovered the three people who were aboard the aircraft that was reported missing, they were deceased," said Speer.

Valley County deputies and McCall firefighters were flown to the crash site to recover the bodies.

Smith says family members traveled from Washington after learning that the plane was missing on Wednesday. Speer says family members of both passengers participated in the search and rescue.

"There was an outpouring of support from the family and they wanted to be involved and lend any resources they could to help in the search," said Speer.

The plane was found in rugged, mountainous terrain at an elevation of 7,000 to 8,000 feet, according to officials with the Idaho Transportation Department's Aeronautics Division.

The single-engine Cessna 206 was reported missing at 10:23 a.m.  The aircraft is registered to Wilderness Aviation of McCall.

The Idaho Army National Guard dispatched the two helicopters Friday morning to an area east of Donnelly where the emergency locator transmitter signal was detected.

The search and rescue team of more than 20 people set out on horseback and foot early this morning from a base camp to search for the missing plane. The ground is covered by about two feet of snow.

The FAA and NTSB will now be investigating the crash.


http://www.ktvb.com
  
http://registry.faa.govN206KL

http://hitchcockaviation.com

http://www.fs.usda.gov









Dan Wilson 
 Credit: oddballpilot.com


 

 DONNELLY – Just after noon Friday, search crews found the wreckage of the plane they'd been searching for since Wednesday. 

Lt. Dan Smith with the Valley County Sheriff's Office says they have confirmed three are dead. The pilot was listed as Dan Wilson from McCall, and the passengers were Mike Wolf and Steve Hall, both from Washington.

Smith tells KTVB the bodies were found in the wreckage on a steep section on the side of a mountain.

Valley County deputies and McCall firefighters were flown to the crash site to recover the bodies.

Smith says family members traveled from Washington after learning that the plane was overdue Wednesday.

The wreckage was sighted easy of Donnelly by an Idaho Army National Guard crew around 9:50 a.m. Friday. It's in rugged, mountainous terrain at an elevation of 7,000 to 8,000 feet, according to officials with the Idaho Transportation Department's Aeronautics Division.

The single-engine Cessna 206 was reported missing at 10:23 a.m.  The aircraft is registered to Wilderness Aviation of McCall. We are told it was a charter flight into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The Idaho Army National Guard dispatched two helicopters Friday morning to an area east of Donnelly where the emergency locator transmitter signal was detected.  The search by aerial and ground crews were hampered over the past two days by poor weather conditions.

The search and rescue team of more than 20 people set out on horseback and foot early this morning from a base camp to search for the missing plane. The ground is covered by about two feet of snow.
 

Source:  http://www.ktvb.com


Two men believed to be from the Woodland area are presumed to have died in a plane crash Wednesday morning in the mountains of Central Idaho, authorities there confirmed Friday morning. 

Searchers aboard an Idaho Army National Guard helicopter at 9:35 a.m. Friday discovered wreckage of a private plane on the side of a steep mountain about 12 miles east of Donnelly, Idaho, said Lieutenant Dan Smith of the Valley County Sheriff’s Department.

Searchers were hiking to the crash site and expected to get there over the noon hour, but there were no immediate signs of survivors, Smith said late Friday morning.

He confirmed  that Steve Hall and Mike Wolf were passengers aboard the plane. Smith could not confirm their ages or cities of residence, but a family friend confirmed for The Daily News that Hall and Wolf are from the Woodland area. The pilot, Dan Wilson, 66, is an employee of McCall Aviation, which owns the Cessna 206 single-engine plane that vanished Wednesday morning shortly after takeoff from McCall with Hall and Wolf aboard.

The Woodlanders were bound for a hunting camp in the Frank Church Wilderness in the Salmon River Basin — only about a 12-minute flight.


http://tdn.com/news


Donnelly, Idaho ( KMVT-TV / KTWT-TV ) – A helicopter search team from the Idaho Army National Guard spotted what is believed to be the wreckage of an airplane missing since Wednesday morning from the McCall airport. 

Wreckage was sighted about 9:50 a.m. today in rugged terrain, at an elevation of between 7,000 and 8,000 feet, several miles east of Donnelly, according to officials from the Idaho Transportation Department’s Aeronautics Division.

A Valley County Search and Rescue team was expected to arrive at the site late this morning or early afternoon. Two teams, one on horseback and another on foot, set out early this morning from a base camp to search for the aircraft.

The aerial search team could not confirm the tail number of the plane or provide information about its occupants.

A Cessna 206 single-engine aircraft carrying a pilot and two passengers left the McCall Airport Wednesday at about 9 a.m., apparently on a charter flight into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

It was reported missing at 10:23 a.m., initiating an extensive search by air and ground. The aircraft is registered to Wilderness Aviation of McCall.

The Idaho Army National Guard dispatched two helicopters again this morning to the region east of Donnelly where an emergency locator transmitter signal was detected. The Idaho Civil Patrol also sent a plane to the location.

More than 20 individuals were involved in the ground search this morning. Air and ground operations were hampered Thursday by inclement weather and poor visibility. The ground is covered by about two feet of snow.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office has assumed responsibility for the search.  


http://www.kmvt.com
  
BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) - Dangerous weather forced crews to call off the search for a plane missing near Donnelly Thursday. 

About a dozen searchers on horseback were turned back. However, the single-engine Cessna 206 has an Emergency Locator Transmitter that may be a beacon of hope for the pilot and two passengers who were on board.

The plane left McCall Wednesday morning, headed for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Search crews have narrowed their search to an area just outside of Donnelly because of the signal from the plane's emergency transmitter.

The signal on the plane goes off automatically when it feels impact, and sends a signal to a satellite to alert emergency crews.

There are different types of transmitters. Older models emit signals that can only be picked up by planes that fly within range of the device. Experts say thankfully, the locator in the Cessna 206 is extremely accurate, and can put crews within a few miles of the plane or its passengers.

"They're pretty reliable," said Cammie Patch, who is a Chief Flight Instructor at Glass Cockpit Aviation in Boise. "This is just a piece of the puzzle, and hopefully one you will never have to depend on. If you needed it though, you'd really like it."

Patch says she's never had to use an ELT. However, she found out how well they can work by mistake.

"Somebody accidentally turned it on one time," Patch said. "They thought it was a different switch, and I immediately got a call."

That call came from emergency crews, who got the signal from the plane's ELT.

"The pilot would know that somebody is going to start looking immediately, and that's a really good thing," Patch said.

Patch said this newer ELT can help crews pinpoint a search area much easier than they could with an older locator that can't send a signal via satellite.

"I think its about a two-mile radius search area," Patch said. "Which is probably five to six times better than the older ones were."

Accuracy is especially important, Patch said, when you're dealing with difficult terrain and harsh weather conditions.

"There are a lot of variables with flying, and for the most part it's super safe," Patch said. "But you have to cover all your bases, and when things are out of your control it's nice to have something like this to be a last resort."

The Emergency Locator Transmitters are battery powered, and Patch said they should be able to last at least a few days after the signal is activated. She also said they are weatherproof, so should be able to hold up in harsh weather conditions.

The device can also be taken out of the plane, in case the passengers needed to move to another area.

Watch Video:   http://www.kboi2.com

 
BOISE -- State transportation officials say the search for a single-engine plane with three people on board that went down in the mountains east of Donnelly has been suspended for the day due to inclement weather. The Cessna 206 took off from the McCall Airport on Wednesday morning.  

Steve Grant with the Idaho Department of Transportation says an 11-person ground team went to the Goldfork trailhead at 7:30 a.m. Thursday to begin looking on foot and horseback for the plane.  He says they have pretty good idea of where the plane went down based on the aircraft's emergency locator transmitter signal, but it is in a remote mountain location. However, they had to turn back because of the weather.

The missing plane is white and snow is falling in the mountains, which is creating visibility problems.  The Civil Air Patrol tried to put a plane up in the air this morning but Grant says they also had to turn back because of the inclement weather.

Grant says cell phone service is not very good in that area, and that's making communications with searchers very difficult.

ITD says the plane seats six people and is owned by Wilderness Aircraft of McCall.

A pilot and two passengers were on board. The plane was headed for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Col. Tim Marsano wit the Idaho Army National Guard says two helicopters, a Blackhawk and a Lakota, left Boise Thursday morning in hopes of assisting in the search.  The helicopters also had to return to base because of the weather.

Grant says there has been no communication with anyone on board the plane.  Temperatures overnight did drop below freezing and snow was falling in the mountains.

Weather permitting, crews plan to resume the search on Friday.


http://www.ktvb.com


BOISE -- The search resumed this morning in the mountains east of Donnelly for a single-engine airplane with three people on board that went missing after take off from the McCall Airport Wednesday morning. 

Steve Grant with the Idaho Department of Transportation says an 11-person ground team went to the Goldfork trailhead at 7:30 a.m. Thursday to begin looking on foot and horseback for the Cessna 206.  He says they have pretty good idea of where the plane went down based on the aircraft's emergency locator transmitter signal, but it is in a remote mountain location.

However, the plane is white and snow is falling in the mountains, which is creating visibility problems.  The Civil Air Patrol tried to put a plane up in the air this morning but Grant says they had to turn back because of the inclement weather.

Grant says cell phone service is not very good in that area, and that's making communications with searchers very difficult.

ITD says the plane seats six people and is owned by Wilderness Aircraft of McCall.

A pilot and two passengers were on board. The plane was headed for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Col. Tim Marsano wit the Idaho Army National Guard says two helicopters, a Blackhawk and a Lakota, did leave Boise around 11 a.m. Thursday and hope to resume the search today, weather permitting.

Grant says there has been no communication with anyone on board the plane.  Temperatures overnight did drop below freezing and snow was falling in the mountains.


http://www.ktvb.com


BOISE -- State transportation officials say inclement weather and snow in the mountains hampered the search for a single-engine airplane with three people on board that went missing after taking off from the McCall Airport this morning. 

The Idaho Transportation Department says the missing aircraft is a white Cessna 206 that seats six people. The plane is owned by Wilderness Aircraft of McCall.

A pilot and two passengers were on the plane, which was headed for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Idaho Army National Guard helicopters are concentrating their search for the missing plane in an area a few miles east of Donnelly, based on the missing aircraft’s emergency locator transmitter signal.

We are told the area is inaccessible to motor vehicles.

The forecast tonight is for more snow and temperatures dropping below freezing in the mountains.

The search will resume at daylight on Thursday.


Source:   http://www.ktvb.com

 The Idaho Transportation Department has announced that search efforts are underway for a small airplane reported missing.  

Owned by McCall Aviation, the missing aircraft has been identified as a white Cessna 206 single-engine plane.

A pilot and two passengers were on board.

The plane left McCall this morning heading toward the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Currently, search efforts from the Idaho Army National Guard have been concentrated in an area a few miles east of Donnelly, based off a signal being emitted from an Emergency Locator Transmitter signal.

The area the signal is coming from is inaccessible to motor vehicles.

Inclement weather and high-mountain snow are hampering search efforts. The search will continue at daylight.


Source:   http://www.jrn.com

Searchers are looking for an airplane that left McCall Wednesday morning, the Idaho Transportation Department announced. 

The missing Cessna 206 is a white, single-engine aircraft that seats six. The pilot was accompanied by two passengers, and they were bound for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The plane is registered to Wilderness Aircraft in McCall.

Idaho Army National Guard helicopters were concentrating their search a few miles east of Donnelly, and they were following the aircraft’s Emergency Locator Transmitter signal. Motor vehicles can't access the area, ITD said.

Inclement weather and high-mountain snow hampered search efforts Wednesday, ITD said, and the search will continue Thursday morning.

Source: http://www.idahostatesman.com

No comments: