Saturday, October 6, 2012

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, N32GP: Accident occurred October 06, 2012 in Mabank, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N32GP 

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA006
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 06, 2012 in Mabank, TX
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N32GP
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 6, 2012, about 0945 central daylight time, a Beech A36 airplane, N32GP, impacted terrain during a descent near Mabank, Texas. The pilot, pilot rated passenger and two other passengers were fatally injured. The airplane's airframe and engine were destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Palm-L Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument flight rules conditions (IFR) conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an activated IFR flight plan. The flight originated from the Northwest Regional Airport (52F), near Roanoke, Texas, about 0845, and was destined for the Athens Municipal Airport (F44), near Athens, Texas.

The pilot obtained a Direct User Access Terminal Service weather briefing at 1526 on the afternoon prior to the flight. There were no records of any updated briefings on the morning of the flight.

The airplane was based at 52F and witnesses saw the airplane depart from there between 0830 and 0900.

According to a copy of the pilot's flight plan, the listed route of flight was direct from 52F to F44 and no alternate airport was entered. The listed departure airport, 52F, did not have Jet-A fuel service. However, both F44 and the Terrell Municipal Airport (TRL), near Terrell, Texas, have services that dispense Jet-A fuel. An IFR flight plan from F44 to the Fletcher Field Airport, near Clarksdale, Mississippi, was also on file.

According to air traffic control (ATC) information received from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight encountered low clouds at F44 and requested a clearance to TRL. The flight was provided the clearance to TRL and subsequently given a frequency change. The FAA’s last reported radar return from the airplane was at 0944:23 at a pressure altitude of 2,900 feet. No further radio transmissions were received.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with an airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. The pilot's most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on August 31, 2011. The medical certificate had a limitation for corrective lenses. At that time, he reported that he had accumulated 340 hours of total flight time and had accumulated no flight time during the six months prior to that application. The pilot recorded in his logbook that he had accumulated 568.5 hours of total flight time and had accumulated 219.5 hours in turbine-powered airplanes. An endorsement, dated May 18, 2012, indicated that the pilot had completed the training required for operating pressurized aircraft. Another endorsement, dated February 16, 2012, indicated that the pilot satisfactorily completed an instrument proficiency check. An endorsement for a current flight review was not located in the pilot’s logbook.

The pilot-rated passenger held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on April 26, 2012. The medical certificate had a limitation for corrective lenses. At that time, he reported that he had accumulated 130 hours of total flight time and had accumulated no flight time during the six months prior to that application.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N32GP, a 1985-model Beech A36, serial number E-2230, was a low wing, single-engine, six-place monoplane, which had retractable tricycle landing gear. According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was powered by a Rolls Royce 250-B17C turbine engine, which was installed in accordance with a Soloy Conversions, Ltd., supplemental type certificate SA3523NM. The installation was approved on a major repair and alteration form dated July 3, 1986. The engine drove a Hartzell, three-bladed, all-metal, constant-speed propeller. An airplane logbook endorsement indicated the airplane had its last annual inspection completed on December 13, 2011. At that time, the airplane had accumulated 2,451.8 hours of total time and the engine accumulated 854 hours of total time. That endorsement entry also indicated that the engine accumulated 205.6 hours since overhaul and 205 cycles since overhaul. A review of logbook entries and mechanic's statements did not reveal any unresolved maintenance or airworthiness issues.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The National Weather Service had issued an Airman’s Meteorological Information advisory that was current at the time period of the accident for IFR conditions in the area surrounding the flight.

At 0953, about 324 degrees and 17 miles from the accident site, the recorded weather at TRL was: wind 020 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; overcast clouds at 600 feet; temperature 12 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury.

At 0935, about 149 degrees and 23 miles from the accident site, the recorded weather at F44 was: wind 020 at 7 knots; visibility 3 statute miles; present weather mist; sky condition overcast clouds at 500 feet; temperature 14 degrees C; dew point 13 degrees C; altimeter 30.12 inches of mercury.

A pilot who was flying in the area about 15 nautical miles northeast of the accident site took pictures of the flight conditions present about 0950. The images exhibited low overcast clouds above the airplane. The pilot’s images are attached to the docket material associated with this case.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a field about one-half nautical mile east of the intersection of Farm to Market Road 90 and Van Zandt County Road 2702. A debris path started at an egg-shaped impact depression that was about 12 feet long and about two feet deep. The wreckage path continued on an observed heading of about 300 degrees and extended about 200 feet. The airplane was fragmented along this path with a section of the fuselage coming to rest about 95 feet from the start of the depression and the engine coming to rest about 190 feet from the start of the depression. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site.

All flight control cables were traced. All observed control cable separations had a broom straw appearance consistent with overload. The left and right wing flap jackscrew actuator measurements corresponded to a zero degree flap setting. The aileron trim actuator measurement was consistent with a neutral setting. The landing gear linkage position was consistent with retracted landing gear. The engine separated from the airframe. Debris, consistent with ingested dirt, was found in the engine’s compressor section. Fuel was found in the fuel pump filter bowl. The fuel shutoff valve handle was separated from its valve housing and light could be seen through a valve housing end when a flashlight illuminated the other end. The propeller was separated from the engine. Two propeller blades remained attached to their hub and they exhibited chordwise abrasions. The separated blade exhibited S-shaped bending and chordwise abrasion. Both vacuum pumps were disassembled and their rotors exhibited impact damage. All vanes in both pumps were intact. The attitude indicator was disassembled and its gyro and cage exhibited rotational scoring. The emergency locator beacon was found within the wreckage debris and it was crushed. Due to impact damage, the total fuel on board the airplane at the time of the accident could not be confirmed.


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot at the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas. The cause of death was listed as blunt force injuries.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report on the pilot. The report was negative for the tests performed.


TESTS AND RESEARCH

Annunciator Panels

Two annunciator panels were retained and subsequently examined by a Chemist in the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory. The report showed that the filaments exhibited inconclusive findings. The report is appended to the docket material associated with this case.

Search and Rescue Actions

According to a NTSB National Resource Analyst, radio and radar contact with the aircraft was lost at 0944. The FAA issued an alert notice reporting loss of contact at 1022. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center opened a search mission and engaged a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) radar analyst at 1135. The CAP analyst reported an initial radar position at 1319, but the analyst did not have access to all of the FAA radar data. In particular, the analyst did not have access to information from the airport surveillance radar located at Sachse, Texas, the closest radar site to the aircraft. Consequently, the initial position provided to search teams was incorrect. At 1834, the CAP informed the rescue coordination center that, based on radar data, "...they have strong reason to believe that the aircraft is within the area of Terrell, Texas..." and that CAP aircraft and ground teams were headed to the Terrell area.

At about 1630, after being notified by the Investigator in Charge that the aircraft was still missing, an NTSB radar analyst joined a teleconference involving FAA personnel from Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center, Fort Worth Approach Control, the Central Service Area Quality Control Group, and headquarters staff from the FAA Compliance Services group, who provide search and rescue support assistance to local ATC facilities upon request. When it became apparent that neither the FAA or the CAP had been able to review the Sachse radar site's data, the NTSB analyst asked to obtain the file. The radar file was provided by Fort Worth approach control at 1942. The NTSB analyst reviewed the information and determined a last known position for the missing aircraft by 1956. The information was provided to Fort Worth Center at 2008 for relay to a sheriff's helicopter involved in the search, and the wreckage was located about 2025 within 0.2 nautical miles of the last known position provided by the NTSB, which was approximately 10 miles southeast of the area being searched by CAP based on their earlier radar assessment not using Sachse data.


 NTSB Identification: CEN13FA006 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 06, 2012 in Mabank, TX
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N32GP
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 6, 2012, about 0945 central daylight time, a Beech A36 airplane, N32GP, impacted terrain during a descent near Mabank, Texas. The pilot, pilot rated passenger and two other passengers were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial airframe and engine damage. The airplane was registered to Palm-L Aviation LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument flight rules conditions (IFR) conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an activated IFR flight plan. The flight originated from the Northwest Regional Airport (52F), near Roanoke, Texas, about 0845, and was destined for the Athens Municipal Airport (F44), near Athens, Texas.

The airplane was based at 52F and witnesses saw the airplane depart from there between 0830 and 0900. The departure airport, 52F, did not dispense Jet-A fuel.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) information received from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight encountered weather at F44 and requested a clearance to Terrell Municipal Airport (TRL), near Terrell, Texas. The flight was provided the clearance to TRL and subsequently given a frequency change. The FAA’s last reported radar return from the airplane was at 0944:23 at a pressure altitude of 2,900 feet. No further radio transmissions were received.

Both F44 and TRL have services that dispense Jet-A fuel. An IFR flight plan from F44 to the Fletcher Field Airport, near Clarksdale, Mississippi, was on file.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with an airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. The pilot's most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on August 31, 2011. The medical certificate had a limitation for corrective lenses. At that time, he reported that he had accumulated 340 hours of total flight time and had accumulated no flight time during the six months prior to that application.

The pilot rated passenger held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on April 26, 2012. The medical certificate had a limitation for corrective lenses. At that time, he reported that he had accumulated 130 hours of total flight time and had accumulated no flight time during the six months prior to that application.

N32GP, a 1985-model Beech A36, serial number E-2230, was a low wing, single-engine, six-place monoplane, which had retractable tricycle landing gear. According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was powered by a Rolls Royce 250-B17C turbine engine, which was installed in accordance with a Soloy Conversions, Ltd., supplemental type certificate SA3523NM. The installation was approved on major repair and alteration form dated July 3, 1986. The engine drove a Hartzell, 3-bladed, all-metal, constant-speed propeller.

At 0953, the recorded weather at TRL was: wind 020 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; overcast clouds at 600 feet; temperature 12 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury.

The airplane impacted a field about one-half nautical mile east of the intersection of Farm to Market Road 90 and Van Zandt County Road 2702. A debris path started at an egg-shaped impact depression that was about 12 feet long and about two feet deep. The path continued on an observed heading of about 300 degrees and extended about 200 feet. The airplane was fragmented along this path with a section of the fuselage coming to rest about 95 feet from the start of the depression and the engine coming to rest about 190 feet from the start of the depression. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site.

All flight control cables were traced. All observed control cable separations had a broom straw appearance consistent with overload. The left and right wing flap jackscrew actuator measurements corresponded to a zero degree flap setting. The aileron trim actuator measurement was consistent with a neutral setting. The landing gear linkage position was consistent with retracted landing gear. The engine separated from the airframe. Debris was found in the engine’s turbine section. Fuel was found in the fuel pump filter bowl. The fuel shutoff valve handle was separated from its valve housing and light could be seen through a valve housing end when a flashlight illuminated the other end. The propeller was separated from the engine. Two propeller blades remained attached to their hub and they exhibited chordwise abrasions. The separated blade exhibited S-shaped bending and chordwise abrasion. Both vacuum pumps were disassembled and their rotors exhibited impact damage. All vanes in both pumps were intact. The attitude indicator was disassembled and its gyro and cage exhibited rotational scoring. The emergency locator beacon was found within the wreckage debris and it was crushed. Due to impact damage, the total fuel on board the airplane at the time of the accident could not be confirmed.

Radar data and communication records have been requested from the FAA for a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) ATC Factual Report. Two annunciator panels have been retained and will be examined at the NTSB Materials Laboratory.


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 32GP        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 10/06/2012     Time: 1445

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: TERRELL   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. TERRELL, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   4
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   3     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DALLAS, TX  (SW05)                    Entry date: 10/09/2012 



 


Photo Courtesy of the Department of Public Safety 
Debris from the crash of a single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza plane cover a wide field outside Mabank, where it went down just inside Van Zandt County on Saturday killing the pilot, co-pilot and two teenage passengers. First responders arrived at the crash site at 8:30 p.m. off VZCR 2702 and half mile from FM 90.


 
A Weslaco dentist, his brother and his two sons were killed in a plane crash on Saturday.



RAW VIDEO: Aerial view of Van Zandt County plane crash

 VAN ZANDT COUNTY (CBSDFW.COM) – Medical examiners have confirmed that two teenagers were among four people who died in a plane crash that happened Saturday. 

 The Van Zandt County Justice of the Peace Court has identified the victims as 62-year-old Gregory Ledet, 60-year-old Donald Ledet and his two sons Paul and Mason.

17-year-old Paul and 13-year-old Mason were both students in the Carroll Independent School District.

Caroll ISD released the following statement on Sunday with the permission of the Ledet family: “The family thanks everyone for their thoughts and prayers – particularly the prayers – during this difficult time. They ask that you please respect their privacy as they grieve the loss of their loved ones.



Source:  http://dfw.cbslocal.com

 

Bad weather may be factor in fatal plane crash 


SOUTHLAKE — Investigators are looking for the cause of Saturday's small plane crash in Van Zandt County that claimed the lives of all four on board.

The single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza left Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke at 9:09 a.m. Saturday. It circled around near Terrell before disappearing from radar about 30 minutes later.

The wreckage wasn't located until late Saturday night in the middle of a pasture.

The manager of Northwest Regional Airport told News 8 he saw the plane's owner — Dr. Leonard Ledet — before taking off on Saturday. The plane is registered to the Southlake dentist and also to a company called Palm-L Aviation.

The airport manager said Ledet had been flying his Beechcraft Bonanza out of Northwest Regional for the past year, often traveling with his brother.

Saturday's flight plan included a stop in Athens, Texas, for fuel. But the plane diverted to Terrell, possibly due to poor weather conditions.

A Texas Department of Public Safety helicopter spotted the wreckage just before 9 p.m. Saturday, about 7 miles short of a runway.

Pilot Leonard Ledet and his son Paul have been confirmed as two of the victims. Investigators are withholding the names of the other two passengers.

Christopher Browning worked with Paul Ledet at Urban Air Trampoline Park in Southlake. He got a phone call at 2 a.m. Sunday alerting him to the tragic news.

"He just brought so much joy, and he was really, really good," Browning said. "He was one of those people we wanted interacting with the customers because he really brought to the facility just so much joy, and I just can't explain."

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the cause of the crash.

http://www.wfaa.com

 
Photo Credit: WFAA

  Investigators on Sunday examined wreckage of the Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft that crashed in a rural Van Zandt County pasture on Saturday.

 
Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

 Photo Credit: WFAA

 Photo Credit: WFAA

 Photo Credit: WFAA

 Photo Credit: WFAA

 Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA

  Photo Credit: WFAA













VAN ZANDT COUNTY — The wreckage of a small plane that disappeared from radar near Terrell on Saturday morning was found hours later in rural Van Zandt County. All four people on board were killed.

An all-day search by the Civil Air Patrol and law enforcement personnel started around 9:40 a.m., shortly after the Beechcraft Bonanza took off from Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke and the pilot lost communication with the control tower.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the last reported position of the aircraft with tail number N32GP was about 25 miles southeast of Terrell.

The wreckage was discovered by a Department of Public Safety helicopter in a pasture near the intersection of FM 90 and County Road 2702 in Van Zandt County, about 25 miles southeast of Kaufman and 22 miles southwest of Canton.

Aerial views of the scene by daylight Sunday showed only small pieces of the aircraft remained, scattered over a wide area of the pasture.

The crash site was more than half a mile from the nearest road. Rescue personnel had to walk part of the way because of muddy terrain.

No additional information was available about the identity of the pilot or the passengers. An FAA spokesman said the plane was registered to an address in Southlake.

Federal records show that the plane that crashed had six seats and was built in 1985.

The Beechcraft Bonanza is a single-engine plane that has been in continuous production since 1947.

Saturday's tragedy is the second deadly crash in the past two weeks of a plane that took off from Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke.

Last month, Charlie Yates and Chris Pratt died shortly after takeoff. Yates — a flight instructor — was helping Pratt "brush up" on his flying skills when the Piper Arrow lost altitude.

The NTSB is still investigating the cause of that crash.

 http://www.wfaa.com

The Texas Department of Safety confirmed one of its helicopters located a downed aircraft with four fatalities late Saturday night near Terrell.  The crash scene is near the State Highway 243 and Farm-To-Market Road 47.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed a Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft departed Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke around 9:40 a.m. Saturday.  It was bound for Mississippi.  Controllers lost radar and radio contact with the plane 25 miles southeast of Terrell in Kaufman County. 

The tail number of plane belongs to a company based in Southlake.

NBC 5 went to the Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke on Saturday night but no one was available for comment.

This is the second fatal crash in two weeks involving a plane that departed the Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke. A pilot and flight instructor died September 23 shortly after takeoff. The cause of that crash is still under investigation.


VAN ZANDT COUNTY — The wreckage of a small plane that went missing near Terrell on Saturday morning was found hours later in rural Van Zandt County. All four people on board were killed.

An all-day search by the Civil Air Patrol and law enforcement personnel started around 9:40 a.m., shortly after the Beechcraft Bonanza took off from Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke and the pilot lost communication with the control tower.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the last reported position of the aircraft with tail number N32GP was about 25 miles southeast of Terrell.

The wreckage was discovered near the intersection of FM 90 and County Road 2702 in Van Zandt County, about 25 miles southeast of Kaufman and 22 miles southwest of Canton.

No additional information was available about the identity of the pilot or the passengers. An FAA spokesman said the plane was registered to an address in Southlake.

Federal records show that the plane that crashed had six seats and was built in 1985.  The Beechcraft Bonanza is a single-engine plane that has been in continuous production since 1947.

http://www.kltv.com

http://www.dallasnews.com

 http://www.wfaa.com

http://www.star-telegram.com


VAN ZANDT COUNTY — The wreckage of a small plane that disappeared from radar near Terrell on Saturday morning was found hours later in rural Van Zandt County. All four people on board were killed.

An all-day search by the Civil Air Patrol and law enforcement personnel started around 9:40 a.m., shortly after the Beechcraft Bonanza took off from Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke and the pilot lost communication with the control tower.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the last reported position of the aircraft with tail number N32GP was about 25 miles southeast of Terrell.

The wreckage was discovered by a Department of Public Safety helicopter in a pasture near the intersection of FM 90 and County Road 2702 in Van Zandt County, about 25 miles southeast of Kaufman and 22 miles southwest of Canton.

The crash site was more than half a mile from the nearest road. Rescue personnel had to walk part of the way because of muddy terrain.

No additional information was available about the identity of the pilot or the passengers. An FAA spokesman said the plane was registered to an address in Southlake.

Federal records show that the plane that crashed had six seats and was built in 1985.

The Beechcraft Bonanza is a single-engine plane that has been in continuous production since 1947.

Saturday's tragedy is the second deadly crash in the past two weeks of a plane that took off from Northwest Regional Airport in Roanoke.

Last month, Charlie Yates and Chris Pratt died shortly after takeoff. Yates — a flight instructor — was helping Pratt "brush up" on his flying skills when the Piper Arrow lost altitude.

The NTSB is still investigating the cause of that crash.