Wednesday, January 4, 2012

No mechanical problems to Cessna in the off runway incident. Plane was being flown by a solo student to perform training circuits.

The light aircraft Cessna that skidded off runway 23 at the Malta International Airport this morning belonged to the Malta School of Flying and was being flown by a solo student to perform training circuits.

Nobody was injured in the incident. The runway was closed but flights were not affected since commercial aircraft normally use the longer runway.

The school said in a statement it is still trying to establish how in the course of a normal landing, the aircraft skidded off the runway.

"Contrary to reports suggesting an emergency landing, the aircraft performed a normal landing with all its systems in full working condition. Mechanical problems have in fact been ruled out.

"The school's maintenance personnel have already inspected the aircraft and have ascertained that no damage has been afflicted on the aircraft, confirming the school's policy of flying Cessna aircraft, renowned worldwide for their resilience, durability and solid construction."

Updated: Light aircraft skids off the runway

A light aircraft skidded off runway 23, the 'old' runway at Malta International Airport early today, but no one was injured.

The runway was temporarily closed but flights were not affected since commercial aircraft normally use the longer runway.

The light aircraft, a Cessna which belongs to the Malta School of Flying, was performing 'touch and go' exercises when the incident happened.

FLYING SCHOOL'S STATEMENT

In a statement, the school said the incident involved a Cessna 172, registered 9H-ACL. The aircraft was being flown by a solo student to perform training circuits, when for reasons still to be established, in the course of a normal landing, the aircraft skidded off the runway. No injuries were sustained.

Contrary to reports (in other media) suggesting an emergency landing, the aircraft performed a normal landing with all its systems in full working condition. Mechanical problems have been ruled out.

"The school's maintenance personnel have already inspected the aircraft and have ascertained that no damage has been afflicted on the aircraft, confirming the School's policy of flying Cessna aircraft, renowned worldwide for their resilience, durability and solid construction. Malta School of Flying therefore has the pleasure of advising its esteemed customers that all its planned flight schedule remains as planned," the school said.

No comments: