Thursday, February 17, 2022

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N58LF: Fatal accident occurred February 16, 2022 near Davidson County Airport (KEXX), Lexington, North Carolina

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas


Location: Lexington, North Carolina 
Accident Number: ERA22FA126
Date and Time: February 16, 2022, 17:07 Local
Registration: N58LF
Aircraft: Beech 58 
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 16, 2022, about 1707 eastern standard time, a Beech 58 airplane, N58LF, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Lexington, North Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the driver of the tractor-trailer and a passenger of that truck sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Three witnesses who were on the airport ramp observed a portion of the takeoff roll, rotation, and initial climb before losing sight of the airplane just before impact. One of the witnesses, who flew for a major airline, reported that the right engine was spewing dense white smoke that the airport video did not accurately depict. Airport security video captured white smoke trailing the airplane about the time the airplane rotated and continued until the airplane went out of sight of the camera, about 1/2 way down the runway. The witnesses noted the airplane level off or decrease the nose-up pitch attitude, with one reporting hearing engine gyrations which he either associated with one engine failing or the engines being out of sync. A photograph taken by one of the witnesses when the airplane was seen near the intersection of taxiway A1 depicted the airplane in a climb attitude with the landing gear extended and smoke trailing the right engine. As the flight continued, the landing gear retracted, the right engine quit, and the propeller stopped. The airplane pitch attitude decreased and then increased. About the time that the landing gear retracted, one of the witnesses noted white/blue colored smoke trailing the left engine and the airplane was described as not having power, while another witness described the smoke trailing the left engine as white. The airplane banked to the left, stalled, pitched nose down, and disappeared behind terrain.

A witness, who was located about 1/4 mile north of the accident site, observed the airplane departing, and an “…engine wasn’t turning.” He observed the airplane descend, followed by a loud sound, then saw smoke.

Video taken from a truck that was travelling in the middle lane of the three-lane highway behind the impacted truck depicted the airplane in a very slight nose-up attitude immediately before impact. The video did not depict the collision with the truck but did depict the resulting fireball and heavy black smoke. It also depicted the tractor-trailer rolling onto its side, and vehicles in very close proximity to the fireball stopping or maneuvering to avoid the fireball.

The driver of the impacted truck reported he was travelling at 65 mph, and he felt the trailer contacted by something. The truck turned over and he and the passenger climbed out of the cab on the passenger side.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N58LF
Model/Series: 58
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EXX, 733 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C /7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4400 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 7500 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.43 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Lexington, NC Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 2 Minor 
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.773983,-80.315802

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 

Raymond John Ackley
February 21, 1978 - February 16, 2022


Mr. Ackley, 43, passed away on February 16, 2022.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Friday, March 4, 2022 at 11am at St. Matthew Catholic Church with Father John Allen Celebrant. The family will receive friends prior to the Mass 10-10:45am, Eulogy to begin at 10:45am. His graveside ceremony will be held on Monday, March 7, 2022 at 11am at Salisbury National Cemetery with full military honors.

Ray was born on February 21, 1978 in Detroit, Michigan.

Ray was a man of intense compassion, patience, and great generosity. He was a strong and respected leader but also a humble person, and a gentle and caring father, son, brother, and husband.

Ray honorably served his country as a leader in the Army National Guard from 2005 to 2014. He rose to the rank of Captain, completing tours in Kuwait and Afghanistan. He earned eight medals and ribbons including the Meritorious Service Award for his selfless service, including as Company Commander of the 196th Signal Company, 113th Battalion. Raymond left the National Guard for the Army Reserve in 2014 to be more present for his family and continued to serve as a Reservist.

Ray also had a successful civilian career as a Computer Engineer, working for Microsoft for over 13 years and previously for Ford Motor Company. He was known professionally as extremely smart, but more importantly as genuine, patient, and kind with his colleagues. He was a creative entrepreneur who graced the world with multiple inventions including a vegetable oil fuel switching device and an air conditioning system for small aircraft, both of which he turned into successful businesses.

Ray was passionate about flying and loved the feeling of freedom he experienced in the air. He shared that passion with his family, flying his sons on adventures to the Bahamas and taking Adam to an epic University of Michigan Football game just months before he passed away. Ray was generous with his many talents and passions; he modeled his generosity by bringing his son along on volunteer Angel Flights to provide free transportation to people in need.

Ray was fun-loving, adventurous, and had a voracious sweet tooth, which his sons have all inherited.

Ray passed away doing what he loved. We pray that he will rest easy in heaven along with his Busia, Armstrong, Paddy, Grandpa Ackley, Aunt Kathy, and Uncle Richard.

He is survived by his wife Ching; children Adam age 11, Benjamin age 6 and Thomas age 5 months; parents Raymond H. and Joanna (Jankowski) Ackley; sisters, Mary Ackley and Angela (Ackley) Nepa and her husband Dominic; niece, Lilyana and nephews, Zac and Matthew.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Angel Flight Soars (www.angelflightsoars.org), 2000 Airport Road Suite 227 Dekalb Peachtree Airport Atlanta, GA 30341.


71 comments:

  1. I've read multiple news reports and there are multiple inconsistencies. Some news articles say the semi crashed into the plane, some say the plane crashed into the semi, and the language is not clear when they say crash in terms of did the plane actually crash and then collide with the semi, or did it successfully land and then either hit or was hit by the semi? The outcome is horrible no matter what led up to it. However, it helps pilots understand, appreciate, and consider the challenges of landing on a busy road. If I have an engine out, I can (hopefully) choose a road or field, and while I prefer the thought of landing on a long flat hard surface, I cringe at having to possibly thread myself between cars or semis in this case. If insurance is going to cover the plane, might as well choose an unobstructed field over a semi-busy road.

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    1. To continue, I know the report on this page consistently says the Baron hit the tractor trailer in the rear, other articles such as this one say differently: Headline "Pilot dies after twin-engine Beechcraft Baron crashes onto 1-85 in North Carolina, is struck by a tractor-trailer and becomes engulfed in flames." Also from the photos, its hard to see, but I dont see a lot of damage to the rear of the semi, but I do see damage on the front, so can see how the semi may have hit the Baron.

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  2. As a pilot and trucker, I can say that landing gear-up in the median is preferable to attempting to land on the pavement when full of traffic! I'm sure there's more to the story however. Sad result...

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  3. Plane had departed runway 24 (heading roughly northeast), and contacted the ground approximately 2150 feet from the departure end, slightly to the right of centerline. From the images shown, it appears the plane struck the ground at the highway shoulder and then into the right rear of the trailer of the semi, causing it to veer right off the shoulder and overturn between the northbound lane of I-85 and the northbound on-ramp of Hargrove Rd. The remains of the aircraft fuselage followed the trailer off the road, possibly from being impaled into the trailer. This is why the tail section shown in the pictures is pointed almost 90 degrees right of its original direction of travel. This is all supposition on my part, from analyzing the images shown on the Kathryn's report, news video of the crash site, and google maps images of the area from overhead. Given the distance he travelled from the runway end to the crash site, he most likely experienced an engine failure with insufficient airspeed or altitude to sustain flight on one engine. It is unknown to me at what point he left the runway on his takeoff, so total flight distance or altitude at the time of his mechanical issue occurred. ADS-B data may shed light on those details.

    My condolences go out to the family of the pilot.

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    1. https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a7748f

      "ADS-B data indicated a maximum altitude of about 300 feet above airport elevation (1000' MSL, 500' pressure altitude) and groundspeed decreasing from 91 knots to 74 knots over 12 seconds."

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    2. I think you meant Rwy 6. Rwy 24 would be a southwest departure.

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    3. He departed off of 24 headed southwest. The interstate crosses the departure path about 1400' from the airport perimeter fence.

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    4. And the impact location is not between the northbound lane of I-85 and the northbound on-ramp of Hargrave Rd.

      Happened on the southbound side of Hargrave Rd. If it was on the north side, you wouldn't see the Exit 87 Hwy52/I-285 bridge in the background in views of the scene taken from Hargrave Rd.

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  4. Did he attempt to land it on the highway or just lost control? The marks don't seem lined up with the road very well at least from the pictures above.

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    1. Very few light-twin pilots would ever willingly land their aircraft on a highway. They would rather die trying to keep it in the air as that is the main point of all the money spent on having one instead of a single. They feel strongly that it should keep its promise no matter the fatal track record.

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    2. My understanding is that you buy a twin to go fast, not to fly around on one engine. If you don't quickly execute the engine out procedure and clean up the airplane it might not be flyable on the remaining engine.

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    3. As a multi-engine rated pilot I can tell you that if he had an engine failure it was at the very worst possible time. Low, slow and probably with the gear in transit. It is very difficult to make the metal cruching decision to put it back down straight ahead. It appears from FlightAware that the airplane hadn't flown since October. That could mean that he may not not have been as current or proficient as he could have been as well. A Baron is a handful on a good day, much less in this situation.

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    4. This had the makings of a VMC roll with the left engine failed. https://youtu.be/n99lvUc9D_E

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    5. "My understanding is that you buy a twin to go fast, not to fly around on one engine."

      Not so much speed as having more payload capability. The single engine Bonanza and Baron both share the same fuselage and seat numbers. But you can pack the Baron with all six seats and bags and 3/4 tanks for a nice cross country trip. For the Bonanza, not so much. Also the speed difference is not that much more for a twin, perhaps 15 knots or so between the Bonanza and Baron at typical low-teen cruise. On a 3-hour flight that might mean a whopping arrival six minutes earlier with the Baron over the Bonanza.

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    6. But then imagine trying to fly that loaded Baron on just one asymetrically located engine close to the ground on departure. I agree that speed is not a very good argument for light twins over high-performance singles. Even with turbines, I remember listening to a TBM being vectored by ATC one day because it was overtaking a commuter airline aircraft in a climb.

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    7. I don't see a VMC roll in that video. Too much forward airspeed and not an extreme wing drop/roll. What it does look like is a sweeping left turn to align with the highway for landing. I think the pilot just found himself in an energy state where colliding with the semi was simply unavoidable.

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    8. Intending to align with the highway seems likely, but the bird was under 100' AGL and sinking rapidly as it crossed the go-south ramp from Hargrave road. Arresting the sink and banking back to the right with a level off would probably not be do-able in the remaining altitude AGL, semi truck in the way or not.

      (Working out the AGL by correcting the 29.92 referenced ADS-B altitude data for the 30.43 local altimeter at the time makes reported altitudes 510 feet lower than true).

      KEXX 162215Z AUTO 17005KT 10SM SCT044 OVC075 16/07 A3043
      KEXX 162155Z AUTO 17009KT 10SM SCT044 OVC075 16/07 A3043

      The 300' MSL altitude reported as the bird passed over the go-south ramp corrects to 810 feet MSL. KEXX field elevation is 732 feet. Hargrave road elevation can be visualized by looking at street view toward the go-south ramp and spinning the view to the right to show the end of RW24:

      Go-south ramp seen from Hargrave Road on Street View:
      https://goo.gl/maps/ScPGAVLdhp2gbKDi8

      Close-up look at what AdsbExchange captured:
      https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a7748f&lat=35.776&lon=-80.315&zoom=16.1&showTrace=2022-02-16&trackLabels

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  5. Google map of the exact location in the Southbound lanes of I-85

    https://www.google.com/maps/@35.7746221,-80.3158782,237m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en

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    1. Approximate Map-pin of the initial impact location:

      http://maps.google.com/maps?t=k&q=loc:35.773944+-80.316176

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  6. The plane struck the rear *portion* of the trailer from the side, above where the trailer's tires are, which pushed the trailer into a spin and it went off the right side of the road and rolled on its side.

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    1. As a multi-engine rated pilot I can tell you that if he had an engine failure it was at the very worst possible time. Low, slow and probably with the gear in transit. It is very difficult to make the metal cruching decision to put it back down straight ahead. It appears from FlightAware that the airplane hadn't flown since October. That could mean that he may not not have been as current or proficient as he could have been as well. A Baron is a handful on a good day, much less in this situation.

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  7. last ADS-B return
    SPATIAL
    Time: 22:10:10 Z
    Ground speed: 70 kt
    Baro. Altitude: ▼ 300 ft
    Geom. Altitude: ▼ 625 ft
    Vert. Rate: -1920 ft/min
    Track: 190.7°
    Pos.: 35.775°, -80.316°

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  8. Did he do a 180d turn before hitting the back of a truck going south?

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    1. Nope.

      Track:
      https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a7748f&lat=35.776&lon=-80.315&zoom=16.1&showTrace=2022-02-16&trackLabels

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  9. There is no record of the pilot having any type of certificate in the FAA database.

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    1. That doesn't mean anything. You can opt out of that database.

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    2. It's there, you just have to look.

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    3. You CAN NOT opt out of the database. You CAN opt out of listing your address but, your info is always there. There are ways to search the database if you know the right criteria to use, even if the airman has opted out of listing their address. One thing that will never show is the Airman's Cert.#

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    4. I searched on myself, but it has incorrect dates for me.

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    5. I believe you can "opt out" of the database, at least as a private pilot--I did so when getting my first student medical in 2009 and even now, if you search my name, birthday, and location, I do not show up in the online database. A friend of mine, who is an ATP, opted out of having their information being made public and only had their address removed from the online database so perhaps it is dependent on the license and ratings held.

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    6. Ok, do you people not know how to use a search form? I typed in the pilot's name and his cert came right up:

      RAYMOND JOHN ACKLEY
      Medical Information:
      Medical Class: Second Medical Date: 12/2019
      BasicMed Course Date: None BasicMed CMEC Date: None
      Certificates
      PRIVATE PILOT

      Certificates Description
      Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT
      Date of Issue: 7/7/2017

      Ratings:
      PRIVATE PILOT
      AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND
      AIRPLANE MULTIENGINE LAND
      INSTRUMENT AIRPLANE

      And no, if you are a US certificated pilot, you cannot opt out of the DB completely. The most you can do is opt-out of releasing your mailing address, like this pilot did.

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    7. Someone opted-out said: "if you search my name, birthday, and location, I do not show up in the online database."

      Leave all location fields blank and your name will show up. Opt outs aren't shown if there is anything at all entered in a city, state, or country field of the search query.

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  10. flightaware "No History Data (searched last 3 months)"

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  11. Last flight shown on FlightAware 10/18/2021

    https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N58LF

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  12. Video almost for sure shows a VMC roll. Perfectly good interstate in front of him to land on if he just pulled the power on the good engine or lowered the nose.

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    1. Crash landing on that very active "interstate in front," intended for vehicular traffic, likely causing multiple casualties beyond the reported.

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    2. Have to say, what I really like about flying single engine is that there's no question as to whether or not you're flying out of an engine failure.

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    3. A Baron 58 with one person on board can still climb just fine on one engine. The main mistake many people make when they lose an engine at that point (right after departure) is they don't adjust their pitch attitude for the loss of power, and they get slow and roll over. Just my point of view with 8500 hours in ME aircraft.

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    4. I was his flight instructor at one time and he was a solid pilot. Whatever went wrong, he had to make a split second decision. It's been a soul crushing experience to see the photos.

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    5. Sorry, disagree. This video of N534FF shows a Vmc roll: https://youtu.be/Urr-AxPUc3c?t=27
      Note how the aircraft abruptly drops a wing from a high pitch attitude and promptly rolls inverted and arcs straight into the ground.

      The video of this aircraft shows a sweeping descending left turn with a decent amount of forward airspeed where the bank angle stays fairly constant and doesn't exceed 45-55 degrees of bank. If he did Vmc roll it, it happened behind the trees and out of sight of the camera.

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    6. If you look at the ADS-B ground speed data and add winds to it, you'll see the pilot remained at or above the Baron's Vmc speed of 84 knots while climbing to 1000 MSL. After that point he descended and slowed down slightly below Vmc, but in a power off descent, the working engine isn't producing enough torque to roll you.

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    7. "A Baron 58 with one person on board can still climb just fine on one engine. The main mistake many people make when they lose an engine at that point (right after departure) is they don't adjust their pitch attitude for the loss of power, and they get slow and roll over. Just my point of view with 8500 hours in ME aircraft."

      Absolutely right. One of the most common tendencies during a V1 Cut is trying to control the Pitch. As you can see how he gained altitude and lost 7 KIAS. The Baron is capable of flying out of this situation but you have to be on top of it and practice this situation until ad naseum. I feel for this Pilot. He did the best he could!! It takes 9 seconds for humans to react to a crisis like that from its unset... God Bless him, he is my hero! Again, it could be fuel contamination, etc, etc. We'll se the final outcome.

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    8. Breakdown of events:
      Engines & Props
      Continental IO-520-C/CB (1,700 HRS. TBO)
      Engine 1 Hours: 25 SMOH
      Engine 2 Hours: 1,538 SMOH

      Normal Take-off with HDG bug on RWY HDG or RNAV engaged (Normal practicer IFR pilots, but if VFR departure.. RWY HDG).

      It appears that Engine #2 (right engine) was the problem engine. The aircraft veer to the right at 300' AGL as his speed decayed to 83 knots (this speed is based on GPS), as our Pilot was trying to determine which engine was having issues combined with avoiding his pitch to increase but, that is VERY difficult unless, you just received recent constant training on V1 cuts in a SIM. His Landing gear I am assuming it was already retracted (takes 6 seconds for it to retract). As you can see in the GPS track his speed is rapidly decaying and he is trying to bring the aircraft back to the Interstate for a safe landing. I am sure he felt the aircraft entered VMC as he lower the nose before touchdown but... The 18 wheeler came in view and he did not have a way out.

      I taught for almost 5 years many SIM sessions on the B-200, B-350i. This is a an issue that no one expect to happen but, when it does, even if you are prepared, that PITCH will come up above 10 degrees hence, the speed will decay rapidly.

      My advise: 1. do not entertain anyone to talk to you on take off and climb until out of 10,000 or cruise altitude if on a Baron or other non-pressurized twins.
      2. Treat every takeoff as a potential engine failure at or past V1. Look at your departure route, check obstacles until after 1500'. Do not try to back around until the aircraft is at safe altitude, VMCY or above speed, clean and as soon as possible (May Day, May Day).

      This good soul has not flown recently, what? the aircraft was last flown in October of last year?. Find a reliable, solid good instructor to give you some training. God Bless this great man and for his service to this beloved country..

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    9. He actually owned multiple Baron's. He flew his other Baron out of Goose Creek 4 days before than incident.

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  13. Good writeup in the CLT Observer about the pilot and his family. He worked for Microsoft, was an officer in the Army Reserve, and has a wife and 3 kids:
    https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article258500468.html

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  14. Looks like his medical expired unless it hasn't been entered by FAA yet.

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    1. Medical is good for 5 years if under 40. Even if he was over 40 at the time of issuance, it was issued 12/2019, meaning it was at least valid until 01/31/2023. You get three years plus 1 month grace period to renew.

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    2. Pilot was 43 years old per article posted, but I agree with the second comment above. It's too early to tell if his had an expired medical or not. The FAA has a backlog of at least a month or two to update medical certificates in the database.

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    3. It is NOT too early to tell if his medical had expired. Unless there were undisclosed circumstances that would negate the validity of his medical, which then would be in a "Revoked" status it was valid until at least December 2022 for private pilot privileges.
      Don't know his birthdate but, if it was issued when he was 39, then it would be valid for 5 years.

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    4. Does no one read the actual text above?
      "The pilot, 43-year-old Raymond John Ackley"
      So yes, we know exactly how old he is now, and even if he just turned 43, the youngest he could be in 12/2019 when he got his 2nd class medical is 40 due to basic math:
      43: 2/2022-
      42: 2/2021-2/2022
      41: 2/2020-2/2021
      40: 2/2019-2/2020

      Per the FAA:
      Second Class Medical Certificate: A second class medical certificate is valid for the remainder of the month of issue; plus
      12 calendar months for operations requiring a second class medical certificate, or
      24 calendar months for operations requiring a third class medical certificate, if the airman is age 40 or over on or before the date of the examination


      So his medical would not be valid after 12/31/2021, but since the FAA is backlogged on database updates, yes it is too early to tell if he renewed it before this flight or not. He could very well have let it lapse for a month and not flown at all until renewing it shortly before the accident flight, which would be 100% legal and we would not see it in the database for another few months.

      TL;DR it's too early to conclude anything about the validity of his medical cert.

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  15. For sale listing that was active a year ago included:

    Engines & Props
    Continental IO-520-C/CB (1,700 HRS. TBO)
    Engine 1 Hours: 25 SMOH
    Engine 2 Hours: 1,538 SMOH

    https://www.hangar67.com/aircraft/1972-beechcraft-baron-58/12895

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  16. A POA forum thread noted that the pilot had discussed engine cylinder work on the Beechtalk forum. Accident flight may have been first flight after engine work. Unknown whether maintenance activity could have been a contributor to the accident.

    https://www.pilotsofamerica.com/community/threads/plane-down-in-davidson-county-nc.136792/

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    1. there was a time when self respecting shops and or the A&P (Airframe Powerplant) mechanic(s) would test fly each and every aircraft they signed off on. Guess the insurance now come into who flies the acft.

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  17. I watched Dan Gryder, Probable Cause on youtube. At this time, I don't anyone can say for a fact what happen here it sure looks like a bad engine. One of the biggest reasons I don't own an aircraft today is because I'm cheap. Always looking for the lowest cost and never wanting to spend one dollar more than needed. That may work well in the construction industry but when it comes to aviation that mindset will kill you. I sure hope this guy didn't die trying to save a buck. It seems to me that we are questioning the advice of others more and more nowadays. We don't believe our election officials when they tell us we had free fair election, don't believe our doctors who tell us the vaccines are safe, efficient, no longer trust teachers, school boards to educate our children. So even when two different maintenance shops tell us we need a total overhaul we still don't believe them. I just don't understand that type of thinking. Maybe I'm a fool but I still see good in others. I verify but then, I trust their judgements. Everyone is not out to get you!!!!!!!!

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    1. Doesn't seem honest for the tuber to assert that the deceased pilot was cheap when the nature of the actual work done is not known. There is not yet even any certainty regarding which engine lost power in the accident sequence.

      Time to stop propagating rude takes from monetized tubers.

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    2. There is a reason most professional pilots think Gryder is garbage. It’s because he is! He is a hack who lives to Monday morning quarterback and the only people who find him insightful do so because they don’t know the difference.

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  18. YouTube revenue is generated by advertisers. And advertisers don't want their ads on videos about aircraft accidents, especially ones where someone died. I follow Juan Browne, Scott Perdue, and a few others and they all ask for Patreon support because their videos on accidents are de-monetized. Dan doesn't ask for support, he does quite well with all the other stuff he has going on. And yes some of his videos are not about crashes so he makes some money off of those.

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    1. Excessive bashing of the FAA and NTSB wasn't a good look for advertisers or patrons either. What would motivate a person to do so much bashing, so often?

      Reading about the "Catch-a-Cardinal" Sweepstakes FAA hearing of October 2009 and the DC3 vs. the police incident a month later provides some context:

      FAA's pre-hearing statement on the Catch-a-Cardinal case:
      https://downloads.regulations.gov/FAA-2009-0281-0017/attachment_1.pdf
      Hearing, October 14, 2009:
      https://downloads.regulations.gov/FAA-2009-0281-0023/attachment_1.pdf
      Full docket list:
      https://www.regulations.gov/docket/FAA-2009-0281/document?sortBy=postedDate

      November 2009 DC3 vs. the police incident:
      https://www.ajc.com/news/local/police-pilot-tried-strike-officers-with-plane/RMhxzKBD5i0K3M5YqjL81K/
      November 2009 Follow Up:
      https://www.ajc.com/news/local/delta-suspends-jailed-pilot/kNz1A9uDMWVK106R6xOPnL/

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    2. FAA V. Gryder Networks = Interesting read!
      Thank you for sharing!

      Delete
  19. Gryder's assessment doesn't make sense to me. He talks about issues with the right engine, and deduces that it fails and causes a Vmc roll, yet disregards the fact that the roll shown in the security cam footage is to the left, opposite his theory. It is omission of small details like this that make me question the creditability of his work.

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    1. His asserting that the pilot carried out a pre-meditated murder of a co-pilot in the N3RB crash did it for most people. No such co-pilot was ever aboard. Done for drama and views...

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    2. Gryder frequently claims his passion for aviation safety started when one of his students, Brock, died in an accident in N1749F where the engine failed after takeoff due to a carb issue and his student failed to handle a lost of thrust on takeoff correctly (one of his frequent themes). However, if you actually look at the official accident report for N1749F, the crash occurred because the pilot left the 172's flaps at 40 degrees after a touch and go with the plane near max gross weight. No engine issues were found: https://planecrashmap.com/plane/ga/N1749F/

      If Gryder gets the facts wrong about an accident so dear to his heart for who knows what reason, what other facts is he getting wrong?

      To be clear, messing up loss on thrust on takeoff is a big issue that definitely needs to be talked about frequently, but details matter, so why twist the cause of an accident to be loss of thrust on takeoff just to serve your narrative when there are plenty of others that actually were to choose from.

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    3. Not expecting stories to be checked is a common trait exhibited by people who are intentionally deceptive. Most people learn not to fabricate stories after being caught and disciplined for it during childhood. Some don't.

      In case someone questions validity of the planecrashmap.com report, here is the N1749F report's CAROL link:
      https://data.ntsb.gov/carol-repgen/api/Aviation/ReportMain/GenerateNewestReport/51030/pdf

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    4. Former MD CFI. Right engine previous problems october 2021 and landed there. Owner only wanted to put cylinder, not overhaul. Looks like on that take off right engine problem again. But.. he reduced power on left engine instead of flying with left engine as it can be done on an empty Baron. And stall it turning left. Crashed on top of the trailer..

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  20. A right engine problem will roll to the right, not left. that was a stall after he cut left engine instead of flying it with the left.

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  21. Both engines in trouble if witness descriptions in prelim are accurate.

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  22. Two engines only guarantee you'll get to the accident site quicker if you lose one....

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    Replies
    1. You also can't Vmc roll an aircraft if you have zero working engines.

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  23. The witness description states there was white plumes of smoke trailing from both engines and then both engines failed, right engine first, then left. Seems odd both engines would fail near simultaneously unless there was fuel contamination. This begs the question, did he take fuel at KEXX? If so, did the line crew accidently top off his tanks with Jet A instead of 100LL. I expect the FAA and NTSB folks know the answers to some of these questions. So very sad and my heart felt condolences to his young family. RIP!

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