Saturday, November 07, 2020

Pilatus PC-12 NGX, N400PW: Accident occurred November 06, 2020 in Big Island, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii 

Aircraft experienced engine failure and ditched in the Pacific Ocean.

https://registry.faa.gov/N400PW 

Date: 06-NOV-20
Time: 23:38:00Z
Regis#: N400PW
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: BIG ISLAND HAWAII
State: PACIFIC OCEAN




HONOLULU (KHON2) — The United States Coast Guard and a pair of good Samaritans responded to a downed aircraft approximately 1,100 miles northeast of Oahu on November 6th.

The Coast Guard says there were two crew members in the Pilatus PC-12 NGX, and no injuries have been reported.

Officials say the Joint Rescue Coordination Center received reports of a downed aircraft around 2:30 p.m.

The Joint Rescue Coordination Center then issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast and directed air units from Air Station Barbers Point to their location. 

All vessels over 20 meters in length within United States waters are required to monitor Urgent Marine Information Broadcast channels.

Two good Samaritans in the area also responded to the Urgent Marine Information Broadcast and set a course to the downed aircraft location.

The Coast Guard and good Samaritans arrived at the scene around 7:15 p.m.

16 comments:

  1. What is a Pilatus PC-12 doing 1,100 miles northeast of Oahu??? -- Besides running out of fuel. Way, way too far away from land to possibly return with remaining fuel. Looks like misconduct.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Correction. I wrote the above post and believe I got it all wrong. This was a ferry flight from just north of LA all the way to Hilo. Also, the pilots were both rescued which tells you at least three things:

      1) Pilots did a very good job alerting the area that they were in trouble ... otherwise a ship wouldn't have been there shortly after their ditching.

      2) The two pilots survived the crash ... which means they did a nice job of setting plane down on the water gently. That's a lot easier to coach and teach and talk about than it is to actually perform. Ask the instructor how many times he or she has ditched an airplane. (Answer = zero).

      3) Got themselves safely into a raft before the plane sunk.

      They did a great job. Glad they're safe.

      Delete
    2. PC 12’s are used on inter island flights. This is a brand NGX SN 2002.

      Delete
  2. This was not in Honolulu county Hawaii. It was in International waters somewhere around ENTIC Waypoint. Just about halfway between SMX and ITO. About 1100 Mi either way.
    Flight Plan info:

    KSMX GVO ELKEY R577 EBBER ITO PHTO

    KSMX 34.8999444 -120.4580833 141° n/a 2355 0 Origin Airport
    GVO 34.5313889 -120.0911111 222° 33 2367 33 VOR-TAC (NAVAID)
    ELKEY 32.6833639 -122.0510083 255° 171 2223 179 Reporting Point
    EDTOO 32.4667000 -123.0010250 257° 57 2166 223 Reporting Point
    EDSEL 32.2423417 -124.0985750 255° 66 2100 279 Reporting Point
    ETECO 30.2858333 -131.6361111 251° 466 1635 725 WAY-PT
    ETNIC 27.9116667 -138.8566667 248° 466 1169 1186 WAY-PT
    ERROT 25.2761111 -145.5108333 245° 450 720 1634 WAY-PT
    ELOYI 22.3441667 -151.8852778 242° 451 273 2085 WAY-PT
    EBBER 21.7134333 -153.1472833 222° 92 185 2176 Reporting Point
    ITO 19.7213889 -155.0108333 268° 183 2 2352 VOR-TAC (NAVAID)
    PHTO 19.7202630 -155.0484701 n/a 2 0 2355 Destination Airport

    JW

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fuel shouldn't have been an issue as the NGX has a range of 1700-1800 miles with full fuel and two pilots, but, the aircraft was fitted with a 3rd party ferry tank installed with an unknown quantity and weight of fuel. So if the rigging, or setup of the tank(s) was improperly installed, fuel exhaustion could be a factor.
    The distance between the two airports is 2355 NM.
    Luckily the two ferry pilots survived and were rescued by a passing ship.

    ReplyDelete
  4. PC-12 Pilot's Operating Handbook and FOCA approved
    3.9.9 DITCHING
    1. Landing gear UP
    Heavy swell with light wind, ditch parallel to the swell. Strong wind, ditch
    into the wind.
    2. Passengers Brief
    3. Flaps 40°
    4. Final approach speed 84 KIAS
    5. CABIN PRESS switch DUMP
    6. Ditch with a low rate of descent.
    7. Electrical Power EMERGENCY OFF (use
    MASTER POWER switch)
    8. Evacuate through the overwing emergency exit only.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "In the July 8, 2007 PC-12 ditching, the pilot reported that the airplane was in cruise at 26,500 ft when he felt a vibration followed by a rapid increase in the engine’s turbine temperature indication (TTI). He reported that the TTI reached 1,144 deg C, at which point there was a compressor stall. He shut down the engine, feathered the propeller and entered a power-off emergency descent. After spending 15 hr in a life raft, the pilot and all three passengers were safely recovered some 60 mi from the Russian coast in the icy Sea of Okhotsk." @ ainonline com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is no TTI indicator. There is a ITT (Interstage Turbine Temperature indicator). The ITT indication system monitors the temperature of the gas flow through the engine at station 4.5 for the Pratt & Whitney PT6.
      The system supplies turbine temperature information via the EEC to the EICAS for display in the flight compartment for the given engine operating conditions. Station 4.5 is called the interstage or the stages between the HP and Low pressure Turbines. This enables the flight crew to monitor the ITT temperature during engine operation and take proper action to prevent the thermodynamic limits of the engine from being exceeded. Temperature probes are permantly installed at location T4.5 between the HP an LP Turbines. The temperature reading is adjusted against T8 in the EEC for average. The engine has what is called a thermodynamic limit and this is monitored by the EEC, if this Temperature should be exceeded, the EEC will signal the FADEC and the engine will auto shutdown.
      ITT, N2 and Fuel flow give unique indicators about engine life and any rise of the three parameters should cause concern. Engine wash or turbine wash can effectively lower ITT because of Sulphirdation on the turbine blades. Turbine tip clearance or tip wear can cause degraded engine performance, higher ITT and increased Fuel flow.

      TIT = Turbine Inlet Temperature. A position forward of the 1st stage turbine inlet guide vanes. The hottest most hostile area in the engine.

      ITT = Interstage Turbine Temperature. A position somewhere between TIT and EGT.

      EGT = Exhaust Gas Temperature. The position just aft of the last turbine wheel.
      TechRep

      Delete
    2. There is no TTI indicator. There is a ITT (Interstage Turbine Temperature indicator). The ITT indication system monitors the temperature of the gas flow through the engine at station 4.5 for the Pratt & Whitney PT6.
      The system supplies turbine temperature information via the EEC to the EICAS for display in the flight compartment for the given engine operating conditions. Station 4.5 is called the interstage or the stages between the HP and Low pressure Turbines. This enables the flight crew to monitor the ITT temperature during engine operation and take proper action to prevent the thermodynamic limits of the engine from being exceeded. Temperature probes are permantly installed at location T4.5 between the HP an LP Turbines. The temperature reading is adjusted against T8 in the EEC for average. The engine has what is called a thermodynamic limit and this is monitored by the EEC, if this Temperature should be exceeded, the EEC will signal the FADEC and the engine will auto shutdown.
      ITT, N2 and Fuel flow give unique indicators about engine life and any rise of the three parameters should cause concern. Engine wash or turbine wash can effectively lower ITT because of Sulphirdation on the turbine blades. Turbine tip clearance or tip wear can cause degraded engine performance, higher ITT and increased Fuel flow.

      TIT = Turbine Inlet Temperature. A position forward of the 1st stage turbine inlet guide vanes. The hottest most hostile area in the engine.

      ITT = Interstage Turbine Temperature. A position somewhere between TIT and EGT.

      EGT = Exhaust Gas Temperature. The position just aft of the last turbine wheel.
      TechRep

      Delete
    3. July 8, 2001,
      "Pilot Michael S. Smith of Boise, Idaho, was flying three Japanese passengers 27,000 feet over the Sea of Okhotsk east of Russia on July 8, 2001, when the plane’s engine began vibrating and making strange noises." https://www.denverpost.com/2007/06/10/planes-dive-spawns-lawsuit/

      Delete
  6. Great ending to a big time emergency that could have gone very wrong. These pilots knew how to survive. Wonder if they will share what went wrong!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pretty sure they were using ferry tanks, if something went screwy with the plumbing and the engine experienced fuel interruption and flameout at 30,000, the procedure is to wait until below at least 20k to attempt restart, restarting higher can slag the motor.

    ReplyDelete