Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Zenith STOL CH 701, N3784A: Accident occurred October 19, 2019 near Safford Regional Airport (KSAD), Graham County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale

https://registry.faa.gov/N3784A


NTSB Identification: GAA20CA039
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 19, 2019 in Safford, AZ
Aircraft: Zenair CH 701, registration: N3784A

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck a bird and made an emergency landing in a creek bed.

Date: 19-OCT-19
Time: 23:54:00Z
Regis#: N3784A
Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Aircraft Model: STOL CH701
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: SAFFORD
State: ARIZONA 




GRAHAM COUNTY - A small airplane made a crash landing in the Artesia area lon October 19th after a bird apparently struck its propeller.

According to a Graham County Sheriff’s Office report, neither of the airplane’s operators, brothers Randy and Ronald White, were injured in the crash.

The plane departed Safford Regional Airport and came to a stop in a sandy wash near Artesia and Stockton Roads. According to the report, Ronald White said they were approaching the area when a black object - apparently a large bird - struck the propeller, causing one side of it to break loose.

Ronald White told a GCSO deputy he had shut down the engine and tried to land the plane on Stockton Road. However, with the weight of the craft and the engine being off, they were unable to glide to the road and landed in the wash.

The airplane’s rear landing gear was sheared off, its fuselage and both wings were damaged, and the propeller was broken. Ronald White said the other side of the propeller broke off during the landing.

A GCSO sergeant contacted the Federal Aviation Administration, which subsequently gave an all clear for the Whites to remove the plane. The brothers dismantled its wings and placed them on a flatbed trailer. With help from an area resident, who had equipment that could pick the plane up and place it on a trailer, the craft was successfully removed.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.eacourier.com

2 comments:

BD said...

I'll bet that plane flies again!

J- said...

Oh ya.... that will rub right out