Sunday, October 20, 2019

Piper PA-24 Comanche, N7742P: Fatal accident occurred October 20, 2019 at Angel Fire Airport (KAXX), Colfax County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Piper Aircraft; Wichita, Kansas
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N7742P 

Location: Angel Fire, NM

Accident Number: WPR20FA008
Date & Time: 10/20/2019, 0845 MDT
Registration: N7742P
Aircraft: Piper PA 24
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 20, 2019, about 0845 mountain daylight time, a Piper PA-24 airplane, N7742P, during takeoff, impacted trees and a building before impacting the ground about 1/2 mile south of the Angel Fire Airport (AXX), Angel Fire, New Mexico. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and a postaccident fire ensued. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that was destined for Great Bend Municipal Airport (GBD), Great Bend, Kansas.


Friends of the pilot, who helped with the refueling and preflight of the accident airplane that morning, said this was the pilots first time flying into this airport. The pilot stated to his friends that he was going to depart to the south and head back towards the airport because of the winds and to gain altitude. The pilot started the engine and let it warm up for about 10-15 minutes. The pilot then taxied to the departure end of runway 17 where he performed a run-up and magnetos check. The pilot's friends watched as the airplane started its takeoff roll and departed a little past midfield. Soon after the airplane departed the runway, they saw the landing gear retract and then lost sight of the airplane behind the parallel taxiway, which rises in elevation above the runway.


An eyewitness was driving north-bound when she saw the airplane flying from the airport on the east side of the highway. The airplane was very low and it appeared to be struggling to remain in flight. The airplane turned to fly over the road and towards the eyewitness, who subsequently drove her vehicle into the ditch alongside the highway. As the airplane was descending, it appeared to the eyewitness that the airplane was preparing to land on the road. The eyewitness noticed a section of power lines that cross the road in front of her location and hoped that the airplane was going avoid hitting them. As the airplane approached the power lines, the airplane pitched up and turned to the west, impacting trees, a building and terrain.


A security camera captured the airplane flying overhead about 50 ft above ground level and over an adjacent road. The airplane was flying wings level and the landing gear was in the down position. As the airplane approached light poles and power lines in the background, the airplane banked right and traveled behind trees and buildings out of view. Another security camera located near the accident site captured the airplane impacting trees and a building, before cartwheeling to the ground in a nose-down attitude. The airplane came to rest in an inverted position and a post-accident fire ensued.


Examination of the accident site revealed that the first identified point of contact were three trees located on the north side of a building. The right wing was found on the building's roof. The right main gear was found on the north side of the building and roof damage was found near the roof peak. The first ground impact was an area of disturbed ground surrounded by red lens fragments. The propeller separated from the engine and propeller blade strikes were found in the ground. The left outboard wing section separated. The main wreckage was found inverted and was the furthest in the debris field. The debris field was about 250 ft long and on a directional heading of about 190 degrees magnetic. Flight control cable continuity was attained, and all major structural components were found. The wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.


AXX was situated at an elevation of 8,379 ft above mean sea level. It was equipped with one runway, designated 17/35, which measured 8,900 ft by 100 ft. AXX was not equipped with an air traffic control tower.


The 0845 automated weather observation at AXX, included winds from 270° at 9 knots gusting to 21 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, and a density altitude of about 9,225 ft mean sea level.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Piper

Registration: N7742P
Model/Series: PA 24 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Schenk Richard J
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAXX, 8380 ft msl
Observation Time: 1445 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C / -13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 21 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 7000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Angel Fire, NM (AXX)  
Destination: Great Bend, KS (GBD)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.393056, -105.286944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Ann Jane "Annie" Schenk
March 3rd, 1959 - October 20th, 2019
~

Ann Jane “Annie” Schenk, 60, entered the gates of heaven with her beloved husband of 40 years, Richard, passing away October 20th, 2019, in Angel Fire, NM. Annie was born March 3, 1959, at Great Bend, to Robert "Bob" and Lois (Ehly) Linsner. Annie married Richard Schenk August 18th, 1979, in Olmitz, Kansas.

Annie, a Great Bend resident since 1988, moving from Olmitz, and growing up in Hoisington, was a homemaker and "Mother" to everyone she met. She was a member of Prince of Peace Parish at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Altar Society, and P.E.O, holding many leadership positions. Annie served her Church and community, being involved with 100 People Who Care Barton County and the Holy Family School Grandfriend program. Annie enjoyed playing cards and Bunco, gardening, and canning peaches and pickles.

In the tradition of German Catholic weddings, Rick and Annie could not resist leading the Grand March, being called on more than one could count. They both loved spending time at their cabin at Kanopolis Lake, where they served on the Yankee Run HOA board, traveling, especially taking trips with five other couples, making cherished memories for many years, and spending time with their grandchildren.

Survivors include three daughters, Allyce Hansford and husband Michael of Prairie Village, Amanda Pfannenstiel of Hays, and Briana Schenk of Russell; two grandchildren, Kolter Pfannenstiel and Kimber Pfannenstiel; four brothers, Larry Linsner and wife Charlotte of Walker, Jim Linsner and wife Shiela of Wichita, Joe Linsner of Great Bend, and Patrick Linsner of Great Bend; two sisters, Pam Redetzke and husband Norman of Salina, and Rhonda Herman and husband Don of Wichita; and one sister-in-law, Margie Linsner of Wichita. She was preceded in death by her parents, Bob and Lois Linsner; one brother, Robert "Bobby" Linsner, Jr.

Mass of Christian Burial will be Noon, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at St. Patrick Catholic Church, with Father Don Bedore presiding. Inurnment will follow at Great Bend Cemetery. Visitation will be Noon to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, with the family present from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., at Bryant Funeral Home. An Altar Society Rosary will be held at 4:00 p.m. and a Vigil with Knights of Columbus Rosary at 7:00 p.m., Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, both at St. Patrick Catholic Church. Memorials may be given to Prince of Peace Parish or Golden Belt Community Foundation, in care of Bryant Funeral Home.

https://www.bryantfh.net


Richard Joseph "Rick" Schenk
April 14th, 1954 - October 20th, 2019
~

Richard Joseph “Rick” Schenk, 65, entered the gates of heaven with his beloved wife of 40 years, Annie, passing away October 20th, 2019, in Angel Fire, NM. Rick was born Apr. 14, 1954 at Great Bend, to Bernard Richard and Mary Jo (Riedel) Schenk. Rick married Ann Jane “Annie” Linsner August 18th, 1979, at Olmitz, Kansas.

Rick, a resident of Great Bend since 1988 moving from Olmitz, was the C.E.O. of Community Bank of the Midwest. Rick was a member of Prince of Peace Parish at St. Patrick Catholic Church, 4th Degree Knights of Columbus Council #2100, Olmitz, EAA flight club, Young Eagles Association and enjoyed men's card group.

Rick served his Church and community, being involved with 100 People Who Care Barton County, Barton County Fair Board, serving as treasurer for more than 20 years, and the Holy Family School Grandfriend program. Rick enjoyed flying his Piper Comanche and was a volunteer pilot for Angel Flights. He was considered a "jack of all trades" and a master of "Dad jokes" and pranks.
In the tradition of German Catholic weddings, Rick and Annie could not resist leading the Grand March, being called on more than one could count. They both loved spending time at their cabin at Kanopolis Lake, where they served on the Yankee Run HOA board, traveling, especially taking trips with five other couples, making cherished memories for many years, and spending time with their Grandchildren.

Survivors include three daughters, Allyce Hansford and husband Michael of Prairie Village, Amanda Pfannenstiel of Hays, and Briana Schenk of Russell; two grandchildren, Kolter Pfannenstiel and Kimber Pfannenstiel; mother, Mary Jo Schenk of Great Bend; two brothers, Brother Mark Schenk, OFMCAP, of Denver, and Greg Schenk and wife Kim of Great Bend; and one sister, Denise Hunt and husband Pat of Laguna Hills, Cal. He was preceded in death by his father, Bernard Richard Schenk; and infant sister, Geralyn Schenk.

Mass of Christian Burial will be Noon, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at St. Patrick Catholic Church, with Father Don Bedore presiding. Inurnment will follow at Great Bend Cemetery.  Visitation will be Noon to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, with the family present from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., at Bryant Funeral Home. An Altar Society Rosary will be held at 4:00 p.m. and a Vigil with Knights of Columbus Rosary at 7:00 p.m., Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, both at St. Patrick Catholic Church. Memorials may be given to Prince of Peace Parish or Golden Belt Community Foundation, in care of Bryant Funeral Home.

https://www.bryantfh.net

 
Anne and Richard Schenk




ANGEL FIRE, New Mexico — Two Great Bend residents, Richard “Rick” Schenk and his wife Ann “Annie” Schenk, died Sunday morning when the single-engine airplane Richard was piloting crash shortly after takeoff from an airport at Angel Fire, N.M., about 24 miles east of Taos.

Richard Schenk, 65, was described as an experienced commercial rated pilot. He was the chief executive officer of Community Bank of the Midwest in Great Bend.

Lt. Mike Woolley, a firefighter and public information officer for the Angel Fire Fire Department, said the plane was a Piper Cherokee 180, a single-engine aircraft.

Woolley posted information on the fire department’s Facebook page, stating the cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration. The post concluded, “Our condolences go out to the family of Mr. and Mrs. Schenk.”

Multiple 911 calls were made at 8:48 a.m. Sunday regarding a plane down in a field between Zeb’s Restaurant and True Value Hardware. Angel Fire Police were notified by witnesses and arrived on scene at 8:50 and an Angel Fire ambulance arrived at 8:53.

The fire department arrived a minute later and the fire was extinguished by 9 a.m.

Witnesses said there were strong wind gusts that morning. The plane clipped the roof of Zeb’s Restaurant and Bar.

The Angel Fire Airport does not have a control tower. According to airnav.com it is located in a mountain valley with rising terrain in all directions, and strong gusty crosswinds are possible.

Woolley said the airport reported winds of 22-30 knots Sunday morning but stressed that it is unknown if the wind was a factor in the crash.

“We do not know the cause of the accident,” he said. “The NTSB and FAA are still investigating.”

Funeral arrangements are pending with Bryant Funeral Home in Great Bend.

https://www.gbtribune.com



Update: Sunday, 8:00 p.m.

The two people who died in the plane crash Sunday morning at Angel Fire Airport have been identified as pilot Richard Joseph Schenk, 65, and Anne Schenk of Great Bend, Kansas, according to officials. Schenk was a commercial pilot, according to a post on the Angel Fire Fire Department Facebook page. 

Schenk was issued a commercial pilot license in 2009 but earlier this year had an unspecified medical condition that disqualified him from renewing his license, according to Federal Aviation Administration records. After an appeal he was granted a one-year special issue certificate until March 2020 when he would have needed to re-apply.

Update: Sunday, 4:43 p.m.

“I can tell you from experience this flight was doomed from the start,” said Capt. Robert Katz, a flight instructor and commercial pilot out of Dallas after reading about the plane crash in Angel Fire that claimed two lives Sunday (October 20th). “It was 100 percent preventable.”

While investigators were still at the scene of the single-engine plane crash Sunday afternoon trying to determine exactly what happened, Katz went to the weather and airport data readily available to all pilots and gave his assessment: the pilot of the doomed plane ignored warnings about wind and terrain and made a bad choice. 

“The runway is aligned in a north-south orientation,” Katz wrote in an email. “The wind would present a direct crosswind to any airplane arriving or departing from either direction. This is the worst case scenario.”

He said pilots should do a pre-flight check before deciding if it is safe to fly; ignoring what the preflight check and weather data say is irresponsible.  He said most small planes are limited to a certain speed of wind to safely fly much the way a truck is only rated to carry a certain amount of weight. 

But airports, especially small ones like Angel Fire, leave it to private pilots to make the ultimate decision on whether to take off. 

Katz, who has been a flight instructor since 1989 and pilot since 1981, reviews airplane accidents almost daily. “It is an avocation,” he said by phone. “I learn from the mistakes these pilots make.”

Original story: A single-engine plane leaving from the Angel Fire Airport Sunday morning (October 20th) crashed shortly after takeoff, killing the two people on board, according to officials.

People were being asked to stay away from the area as investigators work the scene.  

Officials had not yet released the identities of the two people on the plane at noon Sunday and it is unknown if they are from Angel Fire. 

Lt. Mike Woolley, a firefighter and public information officer for the Angel Fire Fire Department, lives near the airport and heard it take off in windy weather.  He doesn't know what caused the crash but wind might have been a factor. "I thought, 'Why would anyone take off in this wind?" Woolley said, estimating it was around 22 knots.

FlightAware listed wind gusts of 25 knots, or nearly 29 miles per hour, at 8:35 a.m.

At 8:48 a.m. Angel Fire dispatch received a call that the plane had crashed in a field between Zeb's Restaurant and Mountain Supply True Value Hardware. Woolley said the plane clipped Zeb's as it tried to take off, though damage to the restaurant and bar was minimal. 

"This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be forthcoming," said Woolley in a statement on the department's Facebook page.  "The best thing the public can do is stay clear of the area."

He said investigators from the state Office of the Medical Investigator, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were on their way to the crash site.

Staff at the airport directed questions to the Angel Fire Fire Department Sunday morning.

Woolley, who owns Re/Max Mountain Realty, said in his 18 years in Angel Fire there have been several plane crashes in the area. 

The National Weather Service in Albuquerque issued a red flag warning east from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, where Angel Fire is located, through the central mountain chain until 8 p.m. Sunday night, as a storm moves into the area bringing high winds.  A wind advisory also was issued for an area from Chama and Taos south through Santa Fe to Estancia until 7 p.m. Sunday night. West winds are expected at 30 to 40 miles per hour with wind gusts up to 50 miles per hour. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.taosnews.com



ANGEL FIRE, New Mexico (KWCH) A Great Bend couple was killed in a fiery plane crash Sunday morning in New Mexico.

The Angel Fire Department says multiple people called 911 around 8:48 a.m. reporting a plane down between Zebs and True Value.

Crews arrived, and the fire was put out minutes later.

Fire officials say Richard Schenk and Anne Schenk were pronounced dead on the scene.

Investigators say Richard was an commercial rated pilot. There is no word yet on what caused the crash.

The cause of the accident is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kwch.com


ANGEL FIRE, New Mexico — Two people have died, after a single-engine plane crashed this morning in Angel Fire, shortly after departing from Angel Fire Airport.

Sam Macias, owner of Zeb's Restaurant and Bar, said he was inside his restaurant when the plane clipped the top of his building.

According to Lt. Mike Woolley with the Angel Fire Fire Department, the plane eventually landed in a nearby field. Woolley confirms that the two occupants of the plane died in the crash.

Macias said nobody in the restaurant was injured.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials are heading to the scene to investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.koat.com

ANGEL FIRE, New Mexico -  Police responded to a plane crash that landed in a field between True Value Hardware and Zebs Restaurant Sunday morning.

Richard Schenk, 65, and Anne Schenk of Great Bend, Kansas were confirmed as the two fatalities.

Richard Schenk was a commercial rated pilot.

The single engine plane clipped part of Zebs Restaurant.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the accident.

Police are asking people to avoid the area.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kob.com

14 comments:

DaveD said...

Angel Fire airport is almost 8400 ft above sea level. It is a challenging airport even when the wind is calm...

Anonymous said...

Just like Mooney N3484X that took off from Angel Fire in 50 knot crosswinds on March 3, 2013. Flipped him over and straight in. He too was warned and questioned by airport personnel. What are these guys thinking? No consideration for anyone's life, including their own. It's basic meteorology and flight planning.

Anonymous said...

Comanche 180 is a great plane ... operated out of near sea level airports that is.

Departing from an 8000' msl airport would be a challenge even before you throw in the cross wind ... a cross wind reportedly far exceeding the maximum demonstrated cross wind for the aircraft.

RIP

Jim said...

A 180 Comanche needs to be a 250 Comanche. Two people, baggage, enough fuel to make Kansas, 8,000 feet MSL. That's a challenge with no wind.

gretnabear said...

Great Bend, KS Barton County
Strongest 13 March, 2019 40.3mph S Average 2010–Present 11.9mph
Strongest 21 October, 2019 33.3mph NW Average October 13.9mph

Anonymous said...

Lived in Kansas while working for a manufacturer ... Flew in and out a lot of the airports in Kansas. Can't recall any of the airports that were not aligned with the wind on dang near every day of the year.

30 or 40 mph wind down the runway in Kansas does not compare to the cross wind on that fateful day at 8000' msl. YMMV.

Again, RIP

7C

Anonymous said...

50kt cross wind? Really what was METAR at time of departure? Cross wind and density altitude are factors, but the comments cross wind "flipped him over and straight in" shows a lack of understanding of how aircraft fly and cross winds. Clearly he was flying, had flying airspeed. If he stalled, that explains the accident, failure to maintain flying airspeed. However cross wind and density altitude alone does not explain a stall. If he had flying airspeed above stall, crabbing into wind, as he would/should have to maintain some ground track, the cross wind would not have "flipped him over". I hate guessing. Let NTSB do their thing. However in past accidents in these scenarios, lack of climb performance and pulling back, along with turbulence from high winds over the ground creates a situation where aircraft performance is not enough, as pointed out, two adults, bags, full fuel. Let's assume that is the case here. If he would have accepted he was not going to climb and made a forced landing under control at min ground speed, it would likely have been very survivable. As Bob Hoover said, fly it all the way into the crash as long as you can. 7900 hr ATP, CFI-Inst-ME...

Anonymous said...

I looked at weather at time of departure: Winds from West 13 mph gust 21 mph and 46F. 20 mph (17 kts) is the demonstrated cross wind component in Manual... It was a 180 HP not 250 HP Comanche. Runway 17/35 means it was a direct cross wind but well within limits. The runway is 8900 x 100. Was the aircraft over loaded? Was the engine healthy and not worn out. It should have been making 75% power....

Anonymous said...

I’m convinced some of these accidents are caused from planes that have engines that are underperforming and not noticeable at lower altitude but when they need the performance at higher altitudes it is unavailable.

Spencer said...

Find some more "big picture" info about Angel Fire (KAXX) here. https://youtu.be/AmrAX7tSvvQ

Anonymous said...

Great briefing in the video at the top. Good job.

7C

Anonymous said...

Watch this video. Considering the field length is 8900 feet, and the location of Zeb's Restaurant - Google Maps measures the distance from takeoff to crash at around 12,300 feet. The airplane only looks to have about 50 feet of altitude at the time of impact. Look at the excellent briefing that is provided at the top of this article, and I bet there was rotor on the lee side of the mountain involved, plus high density altitude. https://ring.com/share/6749897063970601570

Anonymous said...

Watch this video. Considering the field length is 8900 feet, and the location of Zeb's Restaurant - Google Maps measures the distance from takeoff to crash at around 12,300 feet. The airplane only looks to have about 50 feet of altitude at the time of impact. Look at the excellent briefing that is provided at the top of this article, and I bet there was rotor on the lee side of the mountain involved, plus high density altitude.

https://ring.com/share/6749897063970601570

Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at 1:44:00 PM EST

Unknown said...

Operating Certificate(s) Held: None?