Thursday, January 17, 2019

Cessna 172B Skyhawk, N6941X: Accident occurred December 28, 2016 near Sauk Prairie Airport ( 91C), Prairie du Sac, Sauk County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6941X



Location: Prairie Du Sac, WI
Accident Number: CEN17LA090
Date & Time: 12/28/2016, 1230 CST
Registration: N6941X
Aircraft: CESSNA 172B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The private pilot was conducting a local flight. He reported that, during the flight, the engine started to run roughly. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport and while lined up for landing, the pilot increased the engine throttle with no response; the airplane lost total power. He decided to land the airplane on a roadway about 1 mile from the airport. After landing on the roadway and coming to a complete stop, the pilot restarted the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While he was taxiing the airplane, it struck three roadway signs and a fence, which resulted in structural damage to the left wing.

After the airplane was recovered, small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The loss of engine power could have resulted from water in the fuel but the definitive reason could not be determined.

Although the pilot landed the airplane successfully on the roadway after having engine power problems, his decision to taxi the airplane from the roadway and his failure to avoid the roadway signs and fence resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to taxi the airplane from the roadway and his subsequent failure to maintain clearance from signs and a fence after a successful emergency landing following a total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid type
Fuel - Fluid condition

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Monitoring environment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Effect on operation
Sign/marker - Effect on operation

Factual Information 

On December 28, 2016, about 1230 central standard time, a Cessna 172B single engine airplane, N6941X, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage after it struck roadway signs while attempting to taxi after a successful emergency landing near Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Sauk-Prairie Airport (91C), Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin about 1130.

The pilot reported that he was flying locally at 4,500 feet after departing from 91C. The engine started to run rough and the pilot applied carburetor heat. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport, and lined up for landing on runway 18, the pilot increased the engine throttle but had no response. He decided to land on a roadway about 1 mile from the airport.

After landing on the roadway and coming to a stop, the pilot started the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While taxiing, the airplane struck 3 road signs and an iron fence, resulting in structural damage to the left wing.

The local Sheriff closed the highway as the airplane was loaded onto a trailer and transported to 91C where it was examined by an FAA inspector. Approximately 4-5 gallons of fuel were present in each wing tank. Small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The fuel appeared to be automotive fuel. The pilot confirmed that he used automotive fuel. Review of the logbooks did not disclose that the airplane was approved for the use of automotive fuel.

History of Flight

Taxi
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/06/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/22/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3401 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3401 hours (Total, this make and model), 3401 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6941X
Model/Series: 172B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17247841
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/28/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6357 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MSN
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1155 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 260°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Thin Broken / 13000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 20000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.74 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Prairie Du Sac, WI (91C)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Prairie Du Sac, WI (91C)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1130 CST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Sauk-Prairie Airport (91C)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 832 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.297778, -89.755833 (est)











NTSB Identification: CEN17LA090
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 28, 2016 in Prairie Du Sac, WI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172B, registration: N6941X
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 28, 2016, about 1230 central standard time, a Cessna 172B single engine airplane, N6941X, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage after it struck roadway signs while attempting to taxi after a successful emergency landing. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Prairie Du Sac Airport (91C) about 1130.

The pilot reported that he was flying locally at 4,500 feet after departing from 91C. The engine started to run rough and the pilot applied carburetor heat. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport, and lined up for landing on runway 18, the pilot increased the engine throttle, but had no response. He decided to land the airplane on US Highway 12, about 1 mile from the airport. After landing on the roadway and coming to a stop, the pilot started the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While taxiing, the airplane struck 3 road signs and an iron fence, resulting in structural damage to the left wing.

The local Sheriff closed the highway as the airplane was loaded onto a trailer and transported to 91C where it was examined by an FAA inspector. Approximately 4-5 gallons of fuel were present in each wing tank. Small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The fuel appeared to be automotive fuel.

The pilot confirmed that he used automotive fuel. Initial review of the logbooks did not disclose that the airplane was approved for the use of automotive fuel.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice old bird, hope she's flying again.

Jim B said...


This brings up a common gripe that a lot of us have.

If auto-gas is $2.00/gal, why is av-fuel $5.25/gal? That is a factor of 2.6.

Obviously av-fuel is not the same blend and if it was $4.00 per gallon I would not grip too much.

In fact I can remember in 2005 when auto-gas was $1.65/gal and av-fuel was $3.15. That is a factor of 1.2.

A fundamental cause of the mentioned accident is putting the wrong fuel (with alcohol?) in the tanks that absorbs water and promotes corrosion as time progresses.

People cut corners largely because of economics.

For safety sake, it is time 100LL came down to $3.80/gal nationwide.

Glad he walked away.