Saturday, October 20, 2018

Cessna 182L, registered to and operated by the pilot, N42143: Accident occurred July 22, 2017 in Arbuckle, Colusa County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N42143


Location: Arbuckle, CA
Accident Number: WPR17LA160
Date & Time: 07/22/2017, 0845 PDT
Registration: N42143
Aircraft: CESSNA 182L
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 22, 2017, about 0845 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182L airplane, N42143, was substantially damaged during a runway overrun following an aborted takeoff from a private airstrip near Arbuckle, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident and was destined for Colusa, California.

The pilot reported that after engine start, he let the engine run at a medium RPM, while turning on the avionics. The pilot then set the engine RPM to 1,700, conducted a left and right magneto check, along with carburetor heat and cycling the propeller 3 times before reducing RPM to idle. The pilot stated that he set the flaps to 20o, checked the fuel [shutoff] valve, and advanced throttle. As he aligned the airplane with the 2,500-foot long grass/dirt runway, he advanced the throttle to full power. He added that his ground run seemed routine as the airplane had lifted off of the runway as normal. The pilot kept the airplane low to gain airspeed and initiated a climb at an airspeed of 60 miles per hour.

The pilot further stated that the airplane started to climb a few feet, however, settled back down, and he held the elevator forward to "keep the airspeed up" and began another rotation to climb. The pilot realized he was going to be unable to clear the trees at the end of the runway and aborted the takeoff. The pilot stated that his flare was late and the airplane porposed,"so brakes were ineffective." Subsequently, the airplane overran the departure end of the runway and impacted multiple trees before it came to rest upright within an orchard.

Examination of the airplane by local law enforcement revealed that the fuselage and both wings were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination. In addition, first responders reported fuel leaking from both wings.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed that the flap handle was set to the 20° position. Corresponding impact marks, consistent with the flaps were observed on both the left and right sides of the fuselage. The marks were found consistent with a flap setting of about 20°. The flap actuator was measured at 3.9 inches, or about 20° of flaps extended. The elevator trim was found in a position consistent with a takeoff setting.

The airframe was setup for an engine test run and an external fuel source was attached to the right wing fuel inlet line. The engine was primed and started normally. The engine was run throughout various power settings for about 10 minutes before it was shut down using the mixture. During the engine run, a left and right magneto check was conducted, noting an approximate 120 rpm drop for both magnetos. The carburetor heat was found to function normally. No evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane was found.

The pilot reported that at the time of the accident, the airplane weighed 2,641 pounds, or about 159 pounds under the maximum gross weight of 2,800 pounds. Using weights of the pilot and passenger, empty weight of the airplane, and reported fuel load, the IIC calculated that the airplane was within weight and balance limitations at the time of the accident. The pilot operating handbook for the accident airplane, section 5, Operational Data, figure 5-3, Take-Off Data, states that at 2,800 pounds, sea level elevation, and 59°F, no wind, and flaps set to 20°, the required ground run on a hard surface would be 825 feet, or 1,205 to clear a 50-foot obstacle. Note 1 for the Take-Off Chart states that an increase of 10% should be used for each 25°F above standard temperature should be used. Note 2 states that for operation from a dry, grass runway, both ground run and total to clear a 50 feet obstacle should be increased by 7 percent of the total to clear 50-foot obstacle figure.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/31/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/29/2016
Flight Time:  618 hours (Total, all aircraft), 484 hours (Total, this make and model), 580 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N42143
Model/Series: 182L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18258872
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/07/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 16 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6216 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-3
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMYV, 62 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 26 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0853 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 73°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Arbuckle, CA (None)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Colusa, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private (None)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 300 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: E
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2500 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.977222, -122.097222

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA160
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 22, 2017 in Arbuckle, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182L, registration: N42143
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 22, 2017, about 0845 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N42143, was substantially damaged during a runway overrun following an aborted takeoff from a private airstrip near Arbuckle, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The pilot's intended destination was Colusa, California.

The pilot reported that following an uneventful preflight inspection and engine run-up, he began his eastbound takeoff from the private airstrip. As the airplane became airborne, he noticed that the airspeed was decreasing and the airplane was not climbing. The pilot said that he leveled off in ground effect to increase airspeed and verified that the engine was operating at full power. The pilot said he attempted to initiate a climb a second time, however, the airplane did not react as he expected, and he decided to abort the takeoff and land on the runway. Subsequently, the airplane overran the departure end of the runway and impacted multiple trees before it came to rest upright in an orchard.

Examination of the airplane by local law enforcement revealed that the fuselage and both wings were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

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