Friday, September 28, 2018

Dassault Falcon 50, operated by Air American Flight Services Inc, N114TD: Fatal accident occurred September 27, 2018 at Greenville Downtown Airport (KGMU), South Carolina

Stephen George Fox 
April 27, 1952 - September 27, 2018

Steve started flying in 1997, and it became a great passion, he eventually purchased a flight school. He lived as Marc Anthony wrote; If you do what you love, you'll never work a day in your life.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina
Honeywell; Phoenix, Arizona
Dassault Falcon Jet Corp.; New Castle, Delaware
BEA; FN

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N114TD




Location: Greenville, SC

Accident Number: ERA18FA264
Date & Time: 09/27/2018, 1346 EDT
Registration: N114TD
Aircraft: Dassault FALCON 50
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 27, 2018, about 1346 eastern daylight time, a Dassault Falcon 50 business jet, N114TD, operated by Air American Flight Services, Inc., was substantially damaged when it overran the departure end of runway 19 at Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU), Greenville, South Carolina. The airline transport pilot (ATP) seated in the left cockpit seat and private pilot seated in the right cockpit seat were fatally injured, and the two passengers received serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport (PIE), St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida, destined for GMU. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.


Air traffic control personnel at GMU reported that the airplane touched down "normally" at a normal touchdown point on runway. They saw the airplane's sole thrust reverser on the center (No. 2) engine deploy; the controllers then watched as the airplane "did not decelerate" as it continued down the runway. An airport security video captured the airplane's touchdown and confirmed that the No. 2 thrust reverser and the airbrakes were deployed. The video also showed the airplane as it continued down to the end of the runway and then went over an embankment.


First responders reported that all three engines were operating at full power for at least 20 minutes after the accident with, one engine running until about 40 minutes after the accident.


Initial examination of the accident site, runway, and tire track evidence showed that the airplane departed the left edge of runway 19 near the departure end, traveled across the flat grassy area at the end of the runway, continued down a 50-foot embankment, and came to rest on the airport perimeter road about 425 feet from the runway. The wreckage was oriented on a heading of about 160°. There was no fire. Fuel was observed leaking from the wings at the accident site. The nose landing gear was separated and found about midway down the embankment. The fuselage was separated immediately aft of the cockpit area, near fuselage station 14. The slats and flaps were extended. Both the right and left airbrakes (spoilers) were extended. Both main landing gear were fractured at the trunnion and displaced aft into the flaps. The braking anti-skid switch was in the No. 1 position, and there was an "INOP" (inoperative) placard next to the switch, dated the day of the accident. The Nos. 2 and 3 fire handles were pulled. The parking brake was in the normal (off) position.


The left seat pilot held an ATP certificate with a type rating for the Falcon 50 with a limitation for second-in-command only. He also held type ratings for Learjet and Westwind business jets. He held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate issued on August 7, 2108; at that time, he reported 11,650 total hours of flight experience.


The right seat pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land. He did not hold an instrument rating. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate issued on March 27, 2017,and on that date, he reported 5,500 total hours of flight experience.


At 1353, the recorded weather at GMU included wind from 210° at 6 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 27°C, dew point 22°C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.


The airplane was retained for further examination. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Dassault

Registration: N114TD
Model/Series: FALCON 50 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Air America Flight Services INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGMU, 1048 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: St Petersburg-Clearwater, FL (PIE)
Destination:  Greenville, SC (GMU) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal, 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 34.839444, -82.348611 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Stephen George Fox 
April 27, 1952 - September 27, 2018

It is with great sadness that the family of Stephen George Fox Steve of Indian Rocks Beach, FL announces his passing on September 27, 2018 at the age of 66. Steve was born April 27,1952 in Toronto, Ontario. He was preceded in death by his father, Herbert Fox and is survived by his mother, Joan Fox; and brothers Micheal (Karen), and David (Ruth Anne).


Steve was a true Patriarch of his family and was larger than life, he loved being on the water and boating. Steve started flying in 1997, and it became a great passion, he eventually purchased a flight school. He lived as Marc Anthony wrote; If you do what you love, youll never work a day in your life. He was protective over his loved ones. He was a good friend to many. And if there was something he could do for you, he would.


Steve was married to Valerie Ann Fox, for 46 years. He is survived by his sons, Christopher (Stephanie), Timothy (Deanna), Travis (Rachel) and his grandchildren, Amanda, Nicholas, Mathew, Adam, Aaron, Ryan, Brittany, Ashleigh Regimbald, Courtney Regimbald, and Makenna Regimbald. He was preceded by his daughter Dawn Lynn and grandson Austin.


In lieu of flowers, Steve would have wanted you to make a donation to a cause that matters to you, or spend your money and your time showing someone you love how much they mean to you.


Memorial Service details to be determined in the near future.


http://beyondthedash.com


A Tampa health care executive and her husband were the two passengers who survived a jet crash in Greenville, S.C. that killed the pilot and co-pilot last week.

Marci Wilhelm and husband Steve Rose were on board the Dassault Falcon 50 that rolled off the runway and crashed after landing at the Greenville Downtown Airport on Sept. 27, according to Susan Salka, president and CEO of AMN Healthcare.

AMN purchased MedPartners, the Tampa-based health care staffing firm Wilhelm founded, for $195 million earlier this year, according to a news release at the time. Wilhelm stayed on as CEO.

"We are more than co-workers at AMN — we are family," Salka said in the statement. "Our thoughts go out to the family and friends of the pilots who lost their lives in the accident, and right now everyone at MedPartners and AMN Healthcare is focused on doing all we can — both personally and at work — to help Marci and Steve as they heal. It will take patience and hard work, but fortunately both are expected to make a strong recovery."

After rolling off the runway, the jet plunged down a grassy embankment and came to rest on a road. The fuselage split into two pieces behind the cockpit.

Rose posted a public update on his Facebook page Wednesday saying he and Wilhelm were involved in "a chartered plane crash" and have "significant injuries that will take long recoveries" but doctors are optimistic both will make a full recovery.

"It’s nothing short of a miracle!!!!!" the post said. "We are overwhelmed by the thoughts, prayers, and offers of assistance from all over the country and beyond. You are all truly amazing. THANK YOU!!!

In the post, Rose and Wilhelm offered sympathies to the families of the two men killed in the crash, pilot John Christian Caswell of Port St. Lucie and co-pilot Stephen George Fox of Indian Rocks Beach.

Fox, 66, owned two flight services companies, Clearwater Aviation and Air America Flight Services, that provide charters and pilot training. Clearwater Aviation is a sub-tenant at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport.

The couple’s Facebook post thanked friends and family who helped protect the couple’s identity in the days after the crash. Federal and local authorities had refused to name the couple.

"We have actually had a few smiles over being referred to as ‘Unnamed married couple’ for the last five days," the post says. "There may be a tattoo in that somewhere down the road."

"We are in a marathon not a sprint," the post concludes. "Our goal is to get healthy enough to travel and then make our way back to Tampa to finish recovery. We look forward to seeing you all then."

Federal authorities have said the flight originated from St. Petersburg. The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA are investigating the crash. A preliminary report is expected later this month.

The Times reported this week that federal records show neither pilot was qualified to fly the Falcon 50.

Caswell had "second-in-command privileges only" for a Falcon 50 jet, meaning he could only fly that type of jet as a co-pilot with someone who has a pilot-in-command rating, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airmen Registry.

No Stephen Fox or Stephen George Fox in the registry has a pilot-in-command or second-in-command rating for the Falcon 50, FAA records show. The records also indicate Fox was certified only as a private pilot, which means he wouldn’t be legally permitted to pilot or co-pilot a chartered flight. And the records show Fox was certified only for visual flight and didn’t have the rating required to fly an aircraft like the Falcon 50 under instrument flight rules.

https://www.tampabay.com



Pilots Stephen Fox and John Caswell had flown planes for thousands of hours between them at the time of a jet crash that claimed their lives last week in South Carolina.

But federal records show neither man had the certification required to fly the Dassault Falcon 50 jet that slid off the runway of the Greenville Downtown Airport on Thursday, killing both of them and injuring two passengers on board.

Authorities identified Caswell, 49, of Port St. Lucie, as the pilot, but he wasn’t certified to act as the "pilot in command" of a Falcon 50 jet, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airmen Registry. Caswell’s registry entry shows he has a "second-in-command privileges only" for that type of aircraft, meaning he could only fly as a co-pilot with someone who has a pilot-in-command rating.

Fox, a 66-year-old Indian Rocks Beach man who owns two Pinellas County-based flights services companies, was identified as the co-pilot, but no Stephen Fox or Stephen George Fox in the registry has a pilot-in-command or second-in-command rating for the Falcon 50. Fox was certified only for visual flight and didn’t have the rating required to fly an aircraft under instrument flight rules.

"He was not qualified to be on that flight deck, period," said Robert Katz, a Dallas, Texas-based flight instructor and veteran pilot who tracks plane crashes across the nation. "What we’re looking at here is an unqualified crew."

Pilots earn pilot-in-command certification from the FAA after completing hours of training specific to an aircraft. That Fox and Caswell lacked so-called type rating for the Falcon 50 indicates they haven’t had training for that jet, Katz said.

Caswell was certified as an air transport pilot and flight instructor and had type ratings to fly Lear and Gulfstream jets, FAA records show.

"Each aircraft is its own animal," Katz said. "We’re talking apples and oranges and pears."

The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA are investigating the crash. NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss said Monday the agency is focused on collecting evidence at the scene and did not have information on the pilots’ ratings. FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen also could not confirm the pilots’ ratings but said the Airmen Registry reflects the latest information available.

An NTSB investigator said at a news conference last week that Caswell and Fox had significant experience flying, with Caswell logging 11,600 hours and Fox 5,500 hours. The investigator did not address which aircraft type ratings the pilots held.

Airport officials said the plane appeared to land normally about 1:40 p.m. but then slid off the runway and fell 40 to 50 feet down an embankment at the end of the runway, causing the fuselage split behind the cockpit. Caswell died at the scene. Fox was pronounced dead at a local hospital.

Officials said visibility was not a factor in the crash.

Authorities said the two passengers on board were a married couple but have not released their names or where they live. The flight originated in St. Petersburg, according to the NTSB, but the airport has not been identified.

Fox is listed in Florida state records as the registered agent for Air America Flight Services Inc. and Clearwater Aviation. The companies are headquartered at the St. Petersburg-Clearwater Airport and provide executive flight charters, aircraft management, maintenance services and pilot training, according to their websites. Air America also has a location in West Palm Beach.

A friend of Fox’s told the Tampa Bay Times last week that Fox ran the business with his sons. One of the sons, Travis Fox, declined to comment last week and did not immediately return messages this week.

A page on Air America’s site features photos of a Falcon 50, a sleek aircraft with three engines that seats nine in a plush, leather-appointed cabin. The jet has a range of 3,400 miles and top speed of 400 knots, the website says.

FAA records show the Falcon 50 that crashed is owned by Global Aircraft Acquisitions LLC of Delaware. The plane was manufactured in 1982, making it 36 years old.

It was still unclear Monday if the plane had been hired as a charter. If so, the pilots were violating regulations governing charter companies and putting their passengers at risk by flying without the proper qualifications, Katz said. He said such a violation could void any insurance coverage on the aircraft.

Violating charter regulations could also lead to sanctions for a charter company, including revocation of its air carrier certificate, said Jacqueline Rosser, senior advisor at the National Air Transportation Association, a trade group in Washington, D.C.

A preliminary crash report is expected in two to three weeks and a full report will take 12 to 18 months.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tampabay.com

Steve Fox wanted his family business to live on after him.

Passionate about flying and about his air charter company, Fox once asked buddy Jim Collier to make clear to Fox’s sons how much he wanted them to carry on with Air America Flight Services after he was gone.

"He said, ‘If anything happens to me, tell those boys to keep that place going," Collier recalled.

On Thursday, tragedy did befall the family.

Fox, 66, of Indian Rocks Beach was killed when a jet in his company’s fleet crashed shortly after landing in South Carolina, authorities said.

Fox was co-pilot aboard a Dassault Falcon 50 when the triple-engine plane ran off the runway at Greenville Downtown Airport and fell 40 to 50 feet before the fuselage split behind the cockpit, airport officials said. Fox was pronounced dead at a local hospital.

The other pilot, 49-year-old John Christian Caswell of Port St. Lucie, was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash, according to the Greenville County Coroner’s Office.

Two passengers, a husband and wife, survived but are in serious condition, officials said.

Authorities said the reason for the crash was not immediately clear but the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Voice recordings, air traffic control recordings from minutes before the crash and surveillance video from nearby businesses will help provide answers to what happened as the plane arrived at the airport, Dan Boggs, air safety investigator with NTSB, told reporters at a news conference Friday, according to the Greenville News.

Boggs said a crane was brought in to help remove a voice recorder from the belly of the plane, the News reported. Investigators weren’t sure whether the plane, a 1982 model, had a flight data recorder due to its age. Boggs said the plane was flying from Tampa and Greenville was it’s final destination. The report did not specify which airport in Tampa.

Boggs said both Caswell and Fox had significant experience flying, logging 11,600 hours and 5,500 hours, respectively. A preliminary crash report is expected in two to three weeks and a full report will take 12 to 18 months.

The plane appeared to land successfully before it ran off the runway, Joe Frasher, the airport’s director, said at a news conference Thursday.

"We all saw it land and for some reason it did not stop," he said.

After leaving the runway, the plane plunged down a grassy embankment, crashed through a fence and came to rest on Airport Road. Crews cleaned up fuel that spilled from the plane.

Frasher said Thursday evening that one of the injured passengers was able to speak and the other was in surgery. Their names have not been released.

Frasher called it the worst crash the Greenville airport has seen in 20 years.

"We have aircraft this large and larger routinely land at this ramp," he said. "It’s very rare that this has happened."

FAA records show that the plane is owned by Global Aircraft Acquisitions LLC of Delaware. Its two previous owners were companies in Pinellas County.

Fox is listed in Florida state records as the registered agent for Air America Flight Services Inc. and Clearwater Aviation. The companies are headquartered at the St. Petersburg-Clearwater Airport and provide executive flight charters, aircraft management, maintenance services and pilot training, according to their websites. Air America also has a location in West Palm Beach.

Clearwater Aviation is a tenant at the St. Petersburg-Clearwater Airport, said airport spokeswoman Michelle Routh.

A man who answered a phone number listed for the businesses declined to comment Friday.

A page on Air America’s site features photos of a Falcon 50, a sleek aircraft that seats nine in a plush leather-appointed cabin. The jet has a range of 3,400 miles and top speed of 400 knots, the website says.

Fox ran the company with his sons Travis and Tim, according to Collier, a Hudson accountant who knew Steve Fox for about 13 years and used to do his books. Fox lived in Indian Rocks Beach with his wife Valerie, Collier said.

Steve Fox was not rated to captain a jet like the Dassault, so for flights like the one on Thursday, he served as co-pilot and got someone else to captain the aircraft, according to Collier.

Collier is not a pilot but said he has fond memories of flying with Fox over the men’s 13-year friendship.

"When the Lord says you’re going, you’re going," Collier said. "I’m going to miss him. He was just one hell of a guy."

Collier picked up the phone Friday morning and called Travis Fox, who was waiting for more details on the crash, and delivered his message as requested: Remember your father wanted you to keep the business going.

"He’s so distraught," Collier said, "but he’s in there at work."

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.tampabay.com


The Greenville County Coroner has identified the pilot killed in a jet crash at the Greenville Downtown Airport Thursday. 

John Christian Caswell, 49, of Port St. Lucie, Florida, was pronounced dead about an hour after the crash occurred, according to a release from the coroner's office. 

Caswell's co-pilot, Stephen George Fox, of Indian Rocks, Florida, also died when the mid-sized jet tried to land at the Greenville Downtown Airport but ran off the runway and split in two, causing a fuel leak that emergency crews rushed to contain.

The reason for the crash was unclear.

The Coroner's Office said the plane overshot the runway, with the fuselage breaking at the cabin after the jet crashed on Tower Drive. Witnesses said the plane appeared to land without a problem until it overshot the runway and barreled down a steep embankment.

“We all saw it land, and for some reason it did not stop," airport director Joe Frasher said.

The passengers were a married man and woman. They are in critical condition at the hospital, Greenville Fire Department spokesman Tristan Johnson said.

Hospital spokeswoman Sandra Dees said she couldn't share details of the patients' conditions. Frasher said he understood that one of the passengers was in surgery and the other was speaking.

The remaining pilot was still inside the aircraft hours after the crash, with a sheet draped over the cockpit as federal investigators were dispatched from Columbia.

The crash, involving a Dassault Falcon 50 model commonly used in business travel, is the worst in at least 20 years at the airport, Frasher said. The jet was likely landing to pick up more passengers when it ran off a runway embankment and hit nose first, he said.

“In maybe 20 years, we might have had three to four minor incidents and this is probably the most serious,” Frasher said. “We have aircraft this large and larger routinely land at this ramp. It’s very rare that this has happened.”

The roads near the airport will be closed for some time, Police Chief Ken Miller said. 

The fuel leak had been contained to nearby Haywood Road, Fire Chief Steve Kovalcik said. The streams aren't deep in the area, so Kovalcik said "we expect the next good rain we get we'll see more fuel."

Miller encouraged people not to swim downstream, particularly near Haywood Road, nor smoke near the waterway for fear of igniting remnant fuel.

Sam Grice, a flight instructor at the airport who just finished landing from an earlier flight before the crash, said he saw the plane landing, but then looked away and didn't realize it had crashed.

"I feel like it flared, and he just kind of floated a little bit," Grice said. "All of the sudden, right before I walked inside, people were like, 'That jet just ran off the runway.'"

The jet engine was running after it crashed until the gear could be disengaged.

Details from the scene at the airport after the plane crash can be heard in audio captured by LiveATC.net.

Shortly after 1:40 p.m. a man can be heard saying, “As of now, they’re off the runway.”

“I’ve got the Fire Department on the way,” the second voice responds

Then later, a man says, “They are off the runway, they are off the runway in the embankment, the engines are running."

“Are the people on or off the plane? Do you see any people?” another man responds to him.

Then a few minutes later, a man says: "Emergency response is on site."

Kathryn Johnson, of Greenville, lives close to the airport and said she comes to the south ramp often to watch planes take off and land. She said seeing there was a crash is “awful.”

“It’s beautiful. It’s a great airport. You never see anything like this,” she said. “The planes take off here effortlessly.”

The plane is registered to Global Aircraft Acquisitions LLC, based in Delaware. No further information about the company was available through public records.

The crash was the second high-profile wreck involving a plane at the airport within the past two months.

A Beechcraft BE58 belonging to the owner of Halls Chophouse went off the runway and down an embankment during landing on Aug. 3. Everyone on board survived.

Evans said his office was thankful more passengers weren't on the jet during Thursday's crash.

“We’re just lucky that there weren’t any more passengers, souls on the plane," he said. "We’ve only got four to work with and that’s what we’re thankful for.”

The manner of death for the pilots was ruled an accident, the Coroner's Office said. The cause of death for both is pending an investigation.


Original article ➤  https://www.greenvilleonline.com

























(WSPA) - Two people died and two people were critically injured after a jet crashed at the Greenville Downtown Airport Thursday afternoon.

According to Greenville Police Department spokesperson Donnie Porter, the call about the crash came in around 1:40 p.m. Porter said the plane ran off the runway and crashed.

Greenville County Coroner Jeff Fowler confirmed that two people died following the crash.

Greenville City Fire spokesperson Tristan Johnson confirmed that the two people who died were the pilot and the co-pilot of the plane.

Johnson said that the two people injured in the crash are married and are currently in critical condition.

Greenville Memorial Hospital officials told us that three people were taken to the hospital following the crash.

During a second news conference Thursday, City of Greenville Fire Chief Steve Kovalcik said that one of the three people that were taken to the hospital died at the hospital, and said the other deceased person was still in the crashed jet.

According to Kovalcik, after the plane ran off the runway, there was a small fire. The fire has since been put out.

Kovalcik said the two deceased people -- the pilot and the co-pilot -- are both men. He said the two men appeared to have died from injuries related from the crash, but said an autopsy will be performed to confirm their cause of death.

Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board officials are currently en route to the scene to investigate the crash.

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control officials have also responded to the scene because of fuel that leaked from the plane.

Officials said the fuel leaked off of airport property, but said it has since been contained at Haywood Road. They said some of the fuel was reportedly being absorbed into nearby river banks.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration's website, the plane is registered to Global Aircraft Acquisitions LLC of Lewes Delaware. 

The plane is a Dassault Falcon 50.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wjbf.com









GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) - The coroner said two people died after a plane crash at the Greenville Downtown Airport Thursday afternoon and officials asked people to avoid the area due to a Hazmat situation.

Witnesses nearby said the plane was broken in half at the edge of Airport Road and the white fence surrounding the airport.

A spokesman for the police department said the jet went off the runway around 1:39 p.m.

Airport Director Joe Frasher said the plane landed on the runway and then, for unknown reasons, could not stop. The plane continued off the runway, across a grassy area, down an embankment, and crashed at the edge of the road.

Four people, two pilots and two passengers, were on board the plane at the time of the crash, Frasher said.

Deputy Coroner Jeff Fowler confirmed just after 3 p.m. that two people had died.

Three people were transported from the scene to the Greenville Health System but a fourth was trapped in the jet, officials said.

A spokesman for the Greenville Fire Department said the pilot and co-pilot died. The survivors were passengers, a married couple, and are in critical condition.

One pilot was pronounced dead at the scene. The other died at the hospital, Coroner Parks Evans said. All of the victims had to be extricated from the plane. 

Greenville police Chief Ken Miller asked people to avoid Airport Road because the jet leaked fuel, leading to a Hazmat situation.

Hazmat crews were working to contain and absorb the fuel, which was flowing downstream toward Haywood Road, Miller said.

Miller said Airport Road would be closed for some time as the FAA and NTSB investigates the crash.

The Dassault Falcon 50, was registered out of Delaware to Global Aircraft Acquisitions.

There is no word yet on where the flight originated.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.foxcarolina.com

32 comments:

Anonymous said...

It looks like the plane went off the departure end of runway 19. The runway is 5393 ft long x 100 ft wide, plenty of length for a Falcon 50. It's sad and a bit ironic that runway 1, the opposite direction of 19, has an EMAS system to stop a plane from overrunning the end, but its dropoff is nowhere near as steep as that which N114TD went over! I hope the business is able to survive the tragedy, my condolences to the family and friends of those affected.

Jim said...

Another aviation website has a posting that mentions the PIC was type rated only for SIC in the airplane. The owner in the right seat did not appear to have an instrument rating. I don't know if he would be legal in that seat under Part 91 and/or Part 135. I hope the PIC did not misrepresent his quals to the owner.

Anonymous said...

Wow! Just checked the FAA data base and you are right .... SIC only.

Anonymous said...

Neither pilot was rated in the airplane and the airplane itself was not qualified to be doing part 135 charters.

What were they thinking?

Anonymous said...

To fly an aircraft above fl180 you must be instrument rated.

Jim said...

Does the FAA do random general aviation ramp checks or do they wait for somebody to "drop a dime" and depend on that or the "darwin principle?"

Anonymous said...

"To fly an aircraft above fl180 you must be instrument rated."

They were qualified in that respect ... Both ATP ... Specific aircraft qualification not so much.

Anonymous said...

Neither one of theses men were qualified. These two have put a black eye on GA and this business needs to shut down before more are killed or injuried. Typical south Florida “air charter”

Jim said...

While the FAA database does not show that they had the correct ratings, A local Greenville online news article was updated today to eliminate any reference to the pilots being not qualified. Yesterday that article had that reference. So maybe both pilots got the correct quals in the last month and that paperwork has not made it into the FAA database. NTSB report will clear any doubt up.

Anonymous said...

Yep ... Sure looks like another typical South Florida 134 and 1/2 charter operation.

Anonymous said...

Article with video of jet nearing end of runway and crash. There is a flash from the plane shortly before it reaches end of runway. Possible blew tire.
https://www.wyff4.com/article/neither-pilot-in-greenville-crash-had-proper-credentials-to-fly-jet-faa-records-show/23581391

Anonymous said...

If they had been landing in the opposite direction the plane would most likely have been stopped by the runway overrun protection system installed at that end of the runway.

Anonymous said...

To the IDIOT that posted "Yep ... Sure looks like another typical South Florida 134 and 1/2 charter operation.", stop slamming South Florida. If you cannot say something positive; then just SHUT THE HELL UP..MORON.

Anonymous said...

Not a moron ... While there are legit operators in South Florida the area is over run by marginal/illegal operations. I stand by my statement. My apologies if my comment struck a nerve ... Maybe a little too close to home?

Anonymous said...

Not much positive in your angry post. I hope your day improves.

Anonymous said...

This was a case of an aircraft that already had mechanical issues before it departed coupled with an inexperienced, unqualified aircrew on an illegal 135 charter. This operator was known for this. No surprise. The FSDO and NTSB need to do an immediate revocation of the 135 air carrier certificate.

Anonymous said...

The Tampa FSDO should be investigated!!!! They allowed this company to do this for years....Steve would regularly have payments waiting for them in mailbox for FSDO to look other way!!

daveyl123 said...

Actually, this didn't look fatal. Some cabin deformation and deceleration forces would have been injurious. Maybe age was a factor. What was the RCR? The flaps and spoilers were extended, and the #2 Engine Reverse Thrust Bucket deployed, according to the tower controller. The Anti-Skid System was placarded "Inop", so that's a possible causal factor. The Fire Suppression Systems were activated for 2 engines, perhaps indicating the pilot(s) survived the initial impact

Anonymous said...

True that ... If you look at the wreckage you would think it was survivable. However, if you look at the plunge in the video, all it would take for a fatality would be lack of shoulder harness use. We will see what NTSB comes up with.

daveyl123 said...

Anonymous states "The Tampa FSDO should be investigated.." Then goes on to proffer charges of bribery. I'm quite sure the NTSB will look into that possibility, but they'll not make such statements until they're certain of these claims. People must be careful about what they say, particularly when they start leveling criminal charges against others. Hopefully, if some form of coercion or other influences are discovered, we'll be reading about them in official reports, instead of speculating.

daveyl123 said...

The "plunge" as you described it would have subjected the occupants to zero Gs, then a force of at least five Gs positive along with deceleration and transverse loads as the fuselage split would have been a hell of a ride. It looked survivable, and two passengers did survive. The pilot was 66 years old. That may have been the reason why he did not.

Anonymous said...

... And the passengers didn't have an instrument panel for their heads to impact ... Age probably less of an issue than you think. I rem er seeing a series of photos years ago ... A plane sitting in a field with little serious damage ... Certainly to fly again and it did ... The pilot was uninjured except for the small hole in his head from a knob on the panel ... He would have lived if he had used the shoulder harness.

daveyl123 said...

The crew should have had harnesses properly fastened to prevent their heads from impacting the instrument panel. The forces experienced by the occupants would have definitely caused injuries, but this just didn't LOOK fatal. The pilot's ages may have been a factor in their demise. When you're 66 years old, you're definitely out of warranty.

Anonymous said...

If you say so kiddo ... LOL. ;-)

Anonymous said...

Fine waste of a nice airplane!

Anonymous said...

Can't wait to read the witness statement from the pilot that had refused the plane/trip due to the anti-skid inop.
Too often money obstructs clear thinking.

Anonymous said...

Very sad it came to this- they should have been shut down long ago

Anonymous said...

This plane is now at Atlanta Air Salvage in griffin, GA

Anonymous said...

I knew John Caswell well and he was exceptionally thorough. I am completely
blindsided by this news and terrible loss. Is it possible he was unaware of Fox’s lack of credentials?

Anonymous said...

I knew John Caswell well and he was exceptionally thorough. I am completely
blindsided by this news and terrible loss. Is it possible he was unaware of Fox’s lack of credentials?

Anonymous said...

I knew John Caswell well and he was exceptionally thorough. I am completely
blindsided by this news and terrible loss. Is it possible he was unaware of Fox’s lack of credentials?

Jim said...

Is it possible he was unaware of his own lack of credentials? Or are you saying he thought Fox was PIC?