Sunday, August 5, 2018

Cessna TU206C Turbo Skywagon, registered to the pilot and operated by Gypsy Moth Skydive LLC, N29225: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 near Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6), Oklahoma



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Continental; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N29225


Location: Skiatook, OK
Accident Number: CEN16LA323
Date & Time: 08/13/2016, 1100 CDT
Registration: N29225
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 7 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Drop 

On August 13, 2016, about 1100 central standard time, a Cessna TU206B airdrop configured airplane, N29225, registered to the pilot and operated by Gypsy Moth Skydive LLC of Benton, Kansas, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power while maneuvering in the vicinity of Skiatook, Oklahoma. All seven occupants, the private pilot and six passengers (parachutists), sustained minor injuries. The local flight was being operated under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91 and the intent was to climb to altitude and dispatch the 6 parachutists. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6), Skiatook, Oklahoma, about 1030.

According to the pilot, he had topped off the fuel tanks the night before. He was planning to sell the airplane and was giving some demo flights. On the morning of the accident, the preflight was normal. He conducted a flight for about 20-minutes and reported that the engine was running strong. After returning to 2F6, the airplane was shut down for 5-10 minutes. He loaded his air drop passengers and performed normal ground checks of the flight controls and engine. After takeoff, the climbout was about 85 knots and 500 feet per minute rate of climb. About 900-1,000 feet AGL, the engine lost complete power. He immediately nosed over, scanned landing options, and put in 10 degrees of flaps. He committed toward a field near a rural house and set the flaps committed towards field in front of a house, nosed further, set the flaps to 30-degrees a few seconds prior to impact with the ground. The airplane slid to a stop and everyone exited through the aft cargo door.

The initial examination of the wreckage was conducted under the supervision of the FAA. The airplane was resting in a grassy field near a house. The nose landing gear was separated from the firewall mounts and the right main landing gear was separated from the fuselage. the propeller was bent and the engine was separated from the firewall. The front portion of the fuselage was damaged and the forward section of the empennage was buckled. The airplane's wings were removed and the wreckage transported to a secure facility (Dawson Aviation, Clinton, Arkansas) for further examination. About 5 gallons of fuel was removed from the airplane prior to transport to Dawson.

The wreckage was further examined on August 18, 2013, at Dawson Aviation. The inspection was conducted under the supervision of the FAA. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit to all control surfaces. The fuel selector valve was observed between the right tank and off position. The valve was placed in the right tank position and air was passed from the wing tank outlet to the fuel boost pump. The valve was placed in the off position and no air passed through the valve. The fuel strainer was removed and a small amount of fuel was observed. It was tested with water finding paste and the results were negative for water. There was a significant amount of debris observed in the fuel strainer and the strainer bowl. The debris was similar to caulking along with some rust particles. The aircraft was equipped with Monarch Air fuel caps.

There were no seats in the rear of the aircraft. The aircraft was configured for air drop operations and had a bench seat in the passenger compartment. The passengers restraint system appeared to be homemade with the belts attached at the floor attachment location with aluminum snap hooks. Other than the fuel selector valve, and the debris in the fuel strainer bowl, no other anomalies were found with the airframe.

The propeller remained attached to the engine and no damage was observed to the spinner. One propeller blade was not damaged. The second blade exhibited a bend towards the flat side of the blade, about 5-inches in from the blade tip. The third blade was bent toward the flat side of the blade and was curled under the lower area of the engine cowling. The crankshaft of the engine was rotated by hand. There was continuity and air was expelled from all cylinders with thumb compression. Both magnetos produced sparks on the top spark plugs. A "B-Nut" was observed loose on the right side upper deck pressure line. The engine appeared in a condition to perform a test run and was shipped to Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama.

On March 22, 2017, the engine was prepared for a test run at Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama, under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. Initial inspection of the engine did not reveal any pre-impact anomalies. The cylinders were borescoped and all intake and exhaust valves were intact. The piston domes and valve faces exhibited normal combustion signatures. After test cell safety preparations, the engine was placed in the test cell for a run. Since the B-nut to the upper deck pressure was found in a loose condition at the accident site, prior to the initial engine test run, the B-nut was tightened. After the initial test run, the B-nut was loosened and the engine was run a second time with the B-nut loose as it was initially found.

During the initial test run and the second test run, the engine accelerated normally throughout various RPM ranges. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/01/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 906 hours (Total, all aircraft), 63 hours (Total, this make and model), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N29225
Model/Series: TU206C G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: U206-1177
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/01/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 
Time Since Last Inspection: 86 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3688 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520-C
Registered Owner: Monty A Lamar
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: Gypsy Moth Skydiving LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TUL, 677 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 20 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 10°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Skiatook, OK (2F6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Skiatook, OK (2F6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1050 CST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 670 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 6 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 7 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  36.381111, -96.010278 (est)


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA323
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Skiatook, OK
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206C, registration: N29225
Injuries: 7 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1100 central standard time, a Cessna TU206B airdrop configured airplane, N29225, registered to the pilot and operated by Gypsy Moth Skydive LLC of Benton, Kansas, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power while maneuvering in the vicinity of Skiatook, Oklahoma. All seven occupants, the private pilot and six passengers (parachutists), sustained minor injuries. The local flight was being operated under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91 and the intent was to climb to altitude and dispatch the 6 parachutists. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6), Skiatook, Oklahoma, about 1030. 

According to the FAA, the airplane had departed 2F6 and was climbing through about 1,000 feet AGL when the engine lost power. The pilot maneuvered the airplane toward an open grassy field and avoided several rural buildings just prior to landing. The airplane landed hard in the field, resulting in structural buckling to the fuselage and empennage, and separation of the nose gear assembly. All of the occupants exited the airplane and several were treated at a local hospital. 

The accident site was located about 1 mile from 2F6. The airplane wreckage and engine will be examined on August 18, 2016, at a local secure facility.

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