Friday, July 6, 2018

Swearingen SX-300, N42SX: Accident occurred July 05, 2018 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N42SX

Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA184
Date & Time: 07/05/2018, 1345 EDT
Registration: N42SX
Aircraft: Swearingen SX300
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 5, 2018, about 1345 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Swearingen SX-300, N42SX, was destroyed while landing at the Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot was seriously injured, and the pilot-rated passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Flagler Executive Airport (FIN), Palm Coast, Florinda. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot-rated passenger stated that they flew to FIN about 1130 for lunch. They filled-up the fuel tanks at FIN and departed for 7FL6 about 1330. The pilot-rated passenger further stated they had a normal flight back to their home airport, and during approach he verified that the flaps were down and the three green landing gear lights were illuminated in the cockpit. He added that the airspeed indicator showed 90 knots, and just before landing, he heard the angle of attack indicator alarm. The airplane landed hard and he heard a loud pop and felt the left main landing gear fracture. He told the pilot that they broke the left main landing gear and the pilot initially applied full power to takeoff again; however, he then reduced the throttle to idle and applied full braking. The pilot-rated passenger further stated the airplane slid off the left side of the runway and collided with the precision approach path indicator lights. The airplane continued to slide down grass until the right wing dug into the ground; it then flipped-over and caught fire. Both occupants tried to open the canopy, but it was jammed. The passenger tried to kick out the canopy but could not break the glass. Several people ran over to the airplane and helped get the canopy open and egress the two occupants.

A witness who was sitting about mid-field of runway 6 in the airplane observation seats, stated that he observed the airplane "touch down." He was not sure if it was the initial landing or after it bounced once. He further stated the airplane's left landing gear was "trailing behind" and after it landed, the airplane slid off the left side of the runway, spun around and caught fire.

The wreckage was consumed by a postcrash fire and located about mid-field and 60 ft from the left side of runway 6. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 320°. The main wreckage came to rest upright. The instrument panel was consumed by fire and no readable instruments were recovered. Both wings separated from the fuselage and the left wing was located beside the fuselage with about 4 ft of the inboard section remaining. The rest of the wing was consumed by fire. The right wing was located under the fuselage and completely consumed by fire. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. Control cable continuity was confirmed. The engine remained attached to the airframe. The engine, propeller and accessories were fire damaged. The spinner dome was melted on one side.

The two seat, low-wing, retractable gear airplane, was built in 1993. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-540-L1C5, 300-horsepower engine, equipped with a three-bladed Hartzell propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, instrument, and glider. He held a third-class medical certificate, issued July 3, 2018. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 1,650 total hours of flight experience.

At 1350, the recorded weather at New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, located 5 miles southeast of the accident site, was: wind from 120° at 10 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 30° C; dew point 24° C; altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Swearingen
Registration: N42SX
Model/Series: SX300 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEVB, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1750 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Palm Coast, FL (FIN)
Destination: Daytona Beach, FL (7FL6)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.079722, -81.048333 (est)





PORT ORANGE, Fla. - Two people were pulled from the wreckage of small plane crash Thursday near the Spruce Creek Fly-In, according to Volusia County sheriff's officials.

The crash was reported at 1:45 p.m. in the area of Cessna Boulevard in Port Orange. Volusia County Sheriff's Office officials said bystanders pulled the pilot and passenger from the plane that burst into flames in an area off the runway.

A man called 911 as other witnesses attempted to pull the two people from the wreckage engulfed in flames.

"I couldn't help him. I am 75-years-old, I just tried," the 911 caller told dispatch. "We have three people over there trying to extract him. I do not think he's going to come out alive."

Officials said the pilot, John Wilson, 61, of Port Orange, was airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center with critical injuries and the passenger Matthew Simmons, 35, was taken to Halifax Health Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the crash.

The crash marks at least the third crash in the area since May. 

On May 22, an Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University was killed and an instructor was seriously injured in a crash.

Two days later, an airplane went down near the fly-in, injuring a pilot who suffered a head injury.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.clickorlando.com






PORT ORANGE, Fla. (WTXL) - A pilot and passenger inside a small airplane have been injured after a fiery crash at a Central Florida airport. 

Volusia County sheriff’s deputies responded to the crash around 1:45 p.m. on Cessna Boulevard.

A 911 caller told dispatchers the plane, a single-engine aircraft, had crashed near a runway at Spruce Creek Airport and had burst into flames. He said witnesses were working to pull the occupants out of the plane.

The pilot, 61-year-old John Wilson of Port Orange, was airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center with critical injuries. The passenger, 35-year-old Matthew Simmons of Port Orange, was taken via ambulance to Halifax Health Medical Center for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.

Officials with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were notified of the crash.

A cause or circumstances surrounding the crash has not been released at this time. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wtxl.com


PORT ORANGE, Fla. (WESH) - A small plane crashed Thursday afternoon in Volusia County.

The aircraft went down inside the Spruce Creek Fly-In neighborhood in Port Orange and caught fire.

First responders appeared to be treating at least one person on the scene. 

It's unclear how many people were on board and how many people were hurt.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wfla.com








VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. - Two Port Orange men were injured Thursday afternoon when a small plane crashed at the Spruce Creek Fly-In, the Volusia County Sheriff's Office said.

The plane crashed at about 1:45 p.m. near Cessna Boulevard, Sheriff’s Office spokesman Andrew Gant said.

"A 911 caller told dispatchers the plane, a single-engine aircraft, had crashed in the area of the runway and had burst into flames," he said. "He said witnesses were working to pull the occupants out of the plane."

The pilot, John Wilson, 61, was flown to Orlando Regional Medical Center in critical condition, Gant said.

The passenger, Matthew Simmons, 35, was taken to Halifax Health Medical Center by ambulance to be treated for non-life-threatening injuries, deputies said.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration have been notified of the crash, the cause of which remains under investigation.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wftv.com

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I wonder if this aircraft had the upgraded MLG trunions?