Sunday, March 18, 2018

Boeing A75N1(PT17), N48182: Accident occurred October 25, 2016 near McCampbell-Porter Airport (KTFP), Ingleside, San Patricio County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Commemorative Air Force; Dallas, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N48182

Location: Ingleside, TX
Accident Number: CEN17LA032
Date & Time: 10/25/2016, 1415 CDT
Registration: N48182
Aircraft: BOEING A75N1 (PT17)
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 25, 2016, about 1415 central daylight time, a Boeing A75N1 (PT17) single-engine vintage biplane, N48182, impacted terrain during a takeoff from McCampbell-Porter Airport (TFP), Ingleside, Texas. The airline transport pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum and operated by Commemorative Air Force under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight that departed Mustang Beach Airport (RAS), Port Aransas, Texas, about 1300, and was operating in the traffic pattern at TFP when the accident occurred.

The pilot reported that he was practicing takeoffs and landings on runway 13 (5,000 ft by 75 ft, asphalt) with a surface wind slightly left of the runway heading between 5-7 knots. He made two uneventful stop-and-go landings before the accident takeoff. The third takeoff was uneventful until the tail became airborne, around 45 miles per hour (mph), and the airplane began to veer to the right. He responded by reducing right rudder input and applying back stick pressure to become airborne at 65 mph. The pilot reported that upon liftoff, the airplane yawed right as if it had weathervaned into the wind (despite the wind being left of centerline). In response, he reduced airplane pitch to increase airspeed, but the airplane continued to yaw right and it subsequently entered an uncommanded right roll with a slight nose-up pitch attitude. The pilot reported that he was unable to regain control with full left aileron and left rudder inputs. The airplane impacted terrain, off the right side of the runway, in a right wing low attitude. The pilot estimated that the airplane had reached a right bank angle of about 90° when the right wing impacted the ground. The airplane subsequently nosed-over and came to rest inverted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the upper wing and empennage during the impact sequence. The pilot reported having flown 10 hours in the accident airplane make/model.

The pilot postulated that an inflight failure of the right horizontal stabilizer resulted in the uncontrollable right roll during takeoff. A postaccident examination confirmed flight control continuity to all primary flight controls; however, the right horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer were significantly damaged during the accident. The airplane had a braced tail structure, with the bracing wire connecting the horizontal stabilizer forward spar tubes to the vertical stabilizer leading edge. The fractured right horizontal stabilizer's forward and aft spar tubes, right horizontal stabilizer bracing wire with fractured shackle fitting and bolt, and the fractured vertical stabilizer spar tube were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for additional examination. The NTSB laboratory examination determined that all observed separations were consistent with an overstress failure due to impact-related damage; no materials anomalies were identified with any of the submitted components. Additional laboratory documentation for the submitted components is included in the docket materials associated with the investigation.

The operator provided a copy of their training manual used for the Boeing A75N1 (PT17) airplane. The training manual lists the airplane's power-off and power-on aerodynamic stall speeds at maximum gross weight as 55 mph and 51 mph, respectively. The training manual states that after liftoff a pilot is to initially keep the airplane pitch low to increase airspeed to a recommended climb speed of 75-80 mph to allow for adequate engine cooling and forward visibility. The training manual notes that the airplane is known to develop a left swerve during takeoff due to gyroscopic precession. The gyroscopic precession is proportional to the rate of pitch change during the airplane's transition from a three-point to a tail-up pitch attitude. The training manual notes that if a pilot allows the tail to rise too rapidly during takeoff it can result in a rapid left swerve; however, if the tail is raised slow enough, a normal right rudder input may result in a right yaw. The right yaw can be corrected for by raising the tail more rapidly, which allows gyroscopic precession to compensate for the unintended right yaw. The training manual also cautions that the use of aileron, when a rudder input is recommended, during a swerve will result in pilot-induced adverse yaw. Adverse yaw is undesirable tendency for an airplane to yaw in the opposite direction of a roll input. The training manual notes that if the use of aileron control is applied during a swerve, it should be made in the same direction of the swerve. The training manual notes that pilot should quickly detect any small deviations during a takeoff, then immediately respond with small, precise, and aggressive flight control inputs. A copy of the training manual is included in the docket materials associated with the investigation.

At 1415, the TFP automated surface observing system reported: wind 070° at 11 knots, a surface visibility of 10 miles, a clear sky, temperature 31° C, dew point 18° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer; Military
Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:  08/25/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/28/2016
Flight Time:  9050 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10 hours (Total, this make and model), 2500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 182 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 102 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N48182
Model/Series: A75N1 (PT17)
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Aerobatic
Serial Number: 75-967
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/07/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2635 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 25 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3257.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Jacobs
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R-755-B2
Registered Owner: American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum
Rated Power: 275 hp
Operator: Commemorative Air Force
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TFP, 18 ft msl
Observation Time: 1415 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 70°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Port Aransas, TX (RAS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ingleside, TX (TFP)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1300 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: McCampbell-Porter Airport (TFP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 18 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  27.913056, -97.211389 (est)

 NTSB Identification: CEN17LA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 25, 2016 in Ingleside, TX
Aircraft: BOEING A75N1 (PT17), registration: N48182
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 25, 2016, about 1415 central daylight time, a Boeing model A75N1 (PT17) single-engine vintage biplane, N48182, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during a takeoff from McCampbell-Porter Airport (TFP), Ingleside, Texas. The airline transport pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum and operated by Commemorative Air Force under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight that departed Mustang Beach Airport (RAS), Port Aransas, Texas, about 1300, and was operating in the traffic pattern at TFP when the accident occurred.

The pilot reported that he was practicing takeoffs and landings on runway 13 (5,000 feet by 75 feet, asphalt) with a surface wind slightly left of the runway heading between 5-7 knots. He made two uneventful stop-and-go landings before the accident takeoff. The third takeoff was uneventful until the tail became airborne, around 45 miles per hour (mph), and the airplane began to veer to the right. He responded by reducing right rudder input and applying back stick pressure to become airborne at 65 mph. The pilot reported that upon liftoff, the airplane yawed right as if it had weathervaned into the wind (despite the wind being left of centerline). In response, he reduced aircraft pitch to accelerate, but the airplane continued the right yaw and entered a right roll with a slight nose-up pitch attitude. The pilot reported that he was unable to regain control with full left aileron and left rudder inputs. The airplane impacted terrain, off the right side of the runway, in a right wing low attitude. The pilot estimated that the airplane had reached a right bank angle of about 90-degrees when the right wing impacted the ground. The airplane subsequently nosed over and came to rest inverted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the upper wing and empennage during the impact sequence. At 1415, the TFP automated surface observing system reported: wind 070 degrees at 11 knots, clear sky, 10 mile surface visibility; temperature 31 degrees Celsius; dew point 18 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury.

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