Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Cessna 210C, N3607Y, registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot: Accidents occurred January 14, 2017 -and- July 11, 2015 at Juneau International Airport, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3607Y

Location: Juneau, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA019
Date & Time: 01/14/2018, 1445 AKS
Registration: N3607Y
Aircraft: CESSNA 210
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 14, 2018, about 1445 Alaska standard time, a retractable landing gear-equipped Cessna 210 airplane, N3607Y, sustained substantial damage during landing at Juneau Airport (JNU), Juneau, Alaska. The commercial pilot and passenger sustained no injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Hoonah Airport (HNH), Hoonah, Alaska, at about 1425.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that while approaching JNU, he selected the landing gear handle to the down position, and the nose gear extended fully but the left and right main landing gears only partially extended, and the green landing gear position indicator light did not illuminate. He then attempted to manually extend the landing gear by use of the emergency hand pump. After a few pumps however, he felt a loss of pressure feedback in the handle and the landing gear failed to fully extend. He selected the flaps to a down position and no flap movement was evident. After landing and towards the end of the landing roll, the left and right main landing gear collapsed, and the right wing tip and right horizontal stabilizer impacted the runway resulting in substantial damage.

The airplane was removed from the runway and secured for further investigation.

The accident airplane was involved in another landing gear collapse event at JNU on July 11, 2015 (NTSB accident number ANC15LA048). 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N3607Y
Model/Series: 210 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAJN, 24 ft msl
Observation Time: 2353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 70°
Lowest Ceiling:  Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.71 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point:  HOONAH, AK (HNH)
Destination:  JUNEAU, AK (JNU) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  58.355556, -134.580000 (est)



A Juneau airport spokeswoman credits a pilot’s training and emergency personnel for a “happy ending” Sunday afternoon when a small plane was forced to land on its belly. 

The Cessna 210C radioed the Juneau airport tower when its rear landing gear wouldn’t come down. Then the tower alerted the Capital City Fire/Rescue Glacier Station.


Juneau International Airport manager Patty Wahto said the plane circled and attempted to unjam the gear. Emergency personnel set up and waited for the plane to come in.


“For as many aircraft and as many people we have coming in and out of here, to have mechanical issues like this or to actually have to put a plane down on its belly, they’re pretty rare,” Wahto said. “But the pilot did an excellent job, he slowed things down. He still had his nose gear up front. And was able to come in on that and slow everything down.”


Wahto said the pilot turned his engine off and at the last minute put it down on its belly.


Wahto also credited CCFR and airfield crews for their response. Assistant Fire Chief Tod Chambers said the plane made a decent landing.


“Both of the people were able to get out without any problems on their own. There were no injuries,” Chambers said. “There was a small fuel leak that they were able to pretty much stop with materials they carried on the crash rescue trucks.”


Wahto declined to identify the pilot because the incident is still being investigated.


According to the Federal Aviation Administration’s online aircraft registry, the Cessna was registered to Timothy Hlavnicka of Hoonah. The registration expired in May.


A portion of the runway was closed during the incident. Small planes could continue to come in and out.


Story and audio ➤ https://www.ktoo.org

In this extended exposure photo, an Alaska Airlines flight — the white streak on the right — descends onto the runway at Juneau International Airport on Sunday evening. It was business as usual at the airport a few hours after a small plane had landed without gear down at the airport.


A pilot was forced to land his Cessna 210C without landing gear Sunday at Juneau International Airport after a malfunction prevented the gear from descending.

The pilot was able to land the plane safely, and he and his passenger were both able to walk away unharmed. The plane is registered to Hoonah pilot Timothy Hlavnicka, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s listing of the plane. Airport officials weren’t able to confirm whether Hlavnicka was the pilot at the time.

About 2:30 p.m. Sunday, the Cessna was coming in to land in Juneau when the gear wouldn’t go down. The pilot circled around for a bit, Airport Manager Patty Wahto said, then decided to land without the landing gear. Wahto said the pilot kept his composure throughout the situation.

“With as many aircraft as we have coming in and out of Juneau, it’s not all that common,” Wahto said of planes having to land without gear. “People are very calm, cool and collected about it when it happens, and that’s probably what prevents major injuries.”

The plane landed at about 2:45 p.m., Wahto said. A portion of the runway was then closed to allow Capital City Fire/Rescue to come out and provide medical attention if needed. Both occupants were unharmed, CCFR Capt. Roy Johnston said.

There was a hydraulic fluid leak, Wahto said, which was cleaned up afterward. The portion of the runway remained closed for about 45 minutes, she said.

“We’re always happy when it has a good ending,” Wahto said.

According to the FAA’s listing of the plane, the plane’s registration expired May 31, 2017.

Story, video, photo and comments ➤ http://juneauempire.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N3607Y

Location: Juneau, AK
Accident Number: ANC15LA048
Date & Time: 07/11/2015, 1648 AKD
Registration: N3607Y
Aircraft: CESSNA 210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. In preparation for landing at the destination airport, the pilot selected the landing gear handle to the "down" position. The nose gear fully extended and locked into place, but the left and right main landing gear extended only about halfway and then stopped. The pilot's efforts to cycle the landing gear were unsuccessful, and he subsequently conducted an emergency landing to an alternate airport, during which the landing gear collapsed upon touchdown with the runway.

After the accident, the airplane was lifted with a crane and positioned in a level attitude, and hydraulic fluid was observed leaking from the bottom of the airplane. A postaccident examination of the hydraulic system revealed that the left main landing gear hydraulic actuator was fractured due to a fatigue crack that had initiated at the retaining ring recess in the housing and propagated through most of the barrel housing cross-section. Once the actuator was substantially weakened, the housing cracked further from overstress. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A loss of hydraulic fluid due to a fractured left main landing gear hydraulic actuator as a result of a fatigue crack, which led to the landing gear collapsing upon touchdown. 

Findings

Aircraft
Hydraulic fluid - Fluid level (Cause)
Landing gear actuator - Fatigue/wear/corrosion (Cause)
Landing gear actuator - Failure (Cause)

Factual Information 

On July 11, 2015, about 1648 Alaska daylight time, a retractable landing gear-equipped Cessna 210 airplane, N3607Y, sustained substantial damage during landing at Juneau Airport (JNU), Juneau, Alaska. The pilot and passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. No flight plan was on file.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on July 11, 2015, the pilot stated that while approaching the Hoonah Airport, Hoonah, Alaska, the flaps were set to 20 degrees down and the landing gear handle was selected to the down position. The nose gear fully extended and locked into place, but the left and right main landing gear extended about halfway and stopped. The landing gear selector was then placed back into the up position in an effort to cycle the landing gear. The pump was heard running, but the gear failed to move. The landing gear selector was placed again in the down position and in the interest of safety, the pilot decided to change the destination from the Hoonah Airport to the Juneau Airport where there was Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) equipment and personnel. He estimates that during the flight from Hoonah to Juneau, he pumped the landing gear emergency hand pump hundreds of times, but he never felt any resistance in the hydraulic lines.

During removal of the airplane from the runway, it was lifted with a crane so the landing gear could be physically pulled into place and secured with pins to prevent retraction. When the airplane was lifted and positioned in a level attitude, hydraulic fluid was observed leaking from the bottom of the airplane.

On August 5, 2015, an FAA air safety inspector from the Juneau Flight Standards District Office, along with a certified airframe and power plant mechanic, under the direction of the NTSB IIC, examined the airplane's hydraulic system. They hydraulic reservoir was serviced to a full level and the landing gear emergency hand pump was manipulated. A large leak was evident under the pilot seat. When the floor inspection panel was removed, the left main landing gear hydraulic actuator was discovered to be fractured at the end cap and along the side. The actuator was removed and sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC, for a more detailed examination by a Materials Research Engineer.

The hydraulic actuator (P/N 1280501-1, S/N 21058107) was cracked about the barrel section adjacent the endcap with a circumferential and a longitudinal component. Once the endcap was removed, a crescent fragment of the actuator barrel with the circumferential crack fell away. The fracture surface exhibited two thumbnail-shaped cracks, which were examined using a scanning electron microscope. The thumbnail region displayed striations consistent with fatigue crack propagation. Portions of the fracture surface outside of the fatigue crack revealed dimple rupture, consistent with overstress. The thumbnail-shaped fatigue cracks exhibited ratchet marks, consistent with multiple fatigue crack initiation. Examination of these initiation sites did not reveal any discernible material or mechanical defects. However, examination of the surface of the retaining ring groove did reveal multiple corrosion pits.

A detailed examination report including microscopic images is available in the public docket for this accident.

The closest weather reporting facility is Juneau Airport, Juneau. At 1553, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Juneau Airport was reporting in part: wind from 120 degrees at 11 knots; sky condition, few at 500 feet above ground level (agl), broken at 2,700 feet agl, overcast at 5,500 feet agl; visibility 10 statute miles; light rain; temperature 60 degrees F; dewpoint 55 degrees F; barometric pressure 29.72 inHg.

The pilot did not complete and return the required NTSB Accident Reporting Form 6120.1.

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown
Landing gear collapse (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2450 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N3607Y
Model/Series: 210
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21058107
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2998 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 0 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAJN, 24 ft msl
Observation Time: 2353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 88°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 13°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.72 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain; No Obscuration
Departure Point: Juneau, AK (JNU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: HOONAH, AK (HNH)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  AKD
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: JUNEAU INTL (JNU)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 25 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 08
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8857 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  58.356667, -134.580278 (est)

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