Friday, February 24, 2017

Cirrus SR20, N255JB: Accident February 24, 2017 near Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 
Continental; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus; Duluth, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N255JB


Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA113
Date & Time: 02/24/2017, 0639 EST
Registration: N225JB
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 24, 2017, about 0639 eastern standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N255JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The personal flight, destined for Lumberton Regional Airport (LBT) Lumberton, North Carolina, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Track data obtained from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar sensors depicted the airplane climbing out on runway heading to about 300 feet mean sea level, before beginning a descending right turn to the north. About two minutes later, radar contact was lost at an altitude of 50 feet on a northerly ground track.

The pilot stated during the preflight he did not see any low clouds and was able to see stars above him. The pilot intended to depart under visual flight rules (VFR) and open his IFR flight plan after he had reached 1,000 ft. At sunrise, he departed under VFR, while retracting the flaps on initial climbout he encountered instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). He stated, "I was not able to see the low fog until I encountered it." He turned right to avoid any traffic that may have been on final approach to the opposite runway then suddenly he saw a tree. He maneuvered the airplane in an attempt to avoid the tree, then recalled being on the ground, upside down in the airplane. He stated he had not yet begun to transition to instrument flying when he encountered IMC.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site. According to the inspector, the engine was separated from the airframe. The wings, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage all sustained extensive impact damage.
A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation of the airplane.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane was manufactured in 2000, and was equipped with a Continental IO-360. Its most recent inspection was completed in March 2017, at that time the airplane had 1,985 flight hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on July 31, 2017. The pilot reported 790 total hours of flight experience at the time of the accident, and about 80 hours of actual instrument time.

The weather conditions reported at Dayton Beach Regional Airport, Daytona Beach, Florida, located about 7 nautical miles north of the accident site, at 0627, included scattered clouds at 500 feet, wind from 340 at 7 knots, visibility 6 statute miles, mist, temperature 19° C, dew point 19° C, and an altimeter setting 29.79 inches of mercury.

Spatial Disorientation

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-4A, "Pilot's Spatial Disorientation," tests conducted with qualified instrument pilots indicated that it can take as long as 35 seconds to establish full control by instruments after a loss of visual reference of the earth's surface. AC 60-4A further states that surface references and the natural horizon may become obscured even though visibility may be above VFR minimums, and that an inability to perceive the natural horizon or surface references is common during flights over water, at night, in sparsely-populated areas, and in low-visibility conditions. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/31/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  790 hours (Total, all aircraft), 710 hours (Total, this make and model), 700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Registration: N225JB
Model/Series: SR20
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1059
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/31/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1985 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Dawn
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAB, 41 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1127 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 10°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 500 ft agl
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Daytona Beach, FL (7FL6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: LUMBERTON, NC (LBT)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0637 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: SPRUCE CREEK (7FL6)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 23 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 176 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious

Latitude, Longitude:  29.070833, -81.070833 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA113
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 24, 2017 in Daytona Beach, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20, registration: N225JB
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 24, 2017, about 0639 eastern standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N255JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The personal flight, destined for Lumberton Regional Airport (LBT) Lumberton, North Carolina, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane climbing out on runway heading to about 300 feet mean sea level, before beginning a descending right turn to the north. About two minutes later, radar contact was lost at an altitude of 50 feet on a northerly ground track.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site. According to the inspector, the engine was separated from the airframe. The wings, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage all sustained extensive impact damage.

The weather conditions reported at Dayton Beach Regional Airport, Florida, located about 7 nautical miles north of the accident site, at 0627, included scattered clouds at 500 feet, wind from 340 at 7 knots, visibility 6 statute miles, mist, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and an altimeter setting 29.79 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.
 

Alan and Wendy Kanabay






An Illinois couple were injured Friday morning when their small plane crashed into some woods just after takeoff from the Spruce Creek Fly-In, according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office.

Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, from Lakewood, Illinois, were pulled from the wreckage of the Cirrus SR20 by rescue crews. They were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center where they were in stable condition, according to a statement by the Sheriff's Office.

It was the third crash in three months involving a plane arriving or departing the Spruce Creek Fly-In, including one in which two people were killed on Dec. 27.

The two have a home at the Spruce-Creek Fly-In. The crash was reported about 6:40 a.m. just minutes after the plane was scheduled to depart Spruce Creek Airport at 6:37 a.m., according to FlightAware which indicated they were headed to Lumberton, N.C.

A 9-1-1 caller said the plane was upside down with its wings ripped off but the man inside was alive, although he could not see his face.

"He's moving - he answered me - I'm going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders," the caller told a dispatcher. "Tell them to come to my house, and I'll get them out into the swamp."

He told the dispatcher that he could not tell if anyone else was in the plane. He ran back to the road to direct rescuers.

A woman called 9-1-1 to report an unusual sound.

"It sounded like a plane was flying really low over our house and then you heard a huge, huge crash, explosion or something. I don't know if the plane crashed. I don't know if it was a bad car wreck," she said.

On Dec. 12, Lee Kraus suffered minor injuries when his single-engine Beechcraft crashed after take-off from the Spruce Creek Fly-In. The crash caused a small brush fire near Venetian Bay in the New Smyrna Beach area.

On Dec. 27, Daryl Ingalsbe and his partner Deb Solsrud were killed when a single-engine Epic LT aircraft when their plane crashed into a front yard of a home at the Spruce Creek Fly-In.

Federal Aviation Administration Safety Inspector Rick Brown checked the scene shrouded in trees and left just before 11 a.m.

Brown said while the FAA was working on the cause of the crash, he couldn't release any details at the moment.

"I can only tell you that I took some pictures. We're going to review them back at the office," Brown said, who added the federal agency is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to analyze the crash and why it happened.

Story and video:   http://www.news-journalonline.com









VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. - A man and a woman survived a plane crash early Friday near Port Orange, the Volusia County Sheriff's Office said.

Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, both of Illinois, were aboard a small plane when it crashed shortly before 6:45 a.m. near the Spruce Creek Fly-In, Sheriff's Office spokesman Andrew Gant said.

The plane crashed in a wooded area shortly after takeoff, Gant said.

"I thought it was a tree that fell down. It sounded like nothing too severe, and it wasn't until five minutes later I heard my dad run into the house saying a plane had crashed," said neighbor Cody Fulbright.

Deputies said it took firefighters an hour to extricate the pair from the wreckage.

Both were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach in stable condition.

“It’s great to know they are all right,” Fulbright said. “It’s nerve-wracking to know it was right there near the house, and it really could have happened right there at our house."

Investigators said a witness called 911 to report that the plane had flipped and that it was missing its wings.

"He’s moving; he answered me," the witness said in a 911 call. "I’m going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders. Tell them to come to my house and I’ll get them out into the swamp."

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.wftv.com






PORT ORANGE, Fla. - A man and woman survived a plane crash Friday morning in Volusia County, officials said.

Volusia County sheriff's officials said the victims, Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, of Illinois, were pulled from the downed aircraft. They were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach, where they were listed in stable condition.

The crash was reported about 6:40 a.m. in a wooded area near the 2600 block of Bravo V Circle, about a mile from the Spruce Creek Fly-In in Port Orange, where the plane took off, sheriff's officials said.

A 911 caller reported that the plane was upside down with its wings stripped off. 

“He’s moving. He answered me," the caller said. "I’m going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders. Tell them to come to my house, and I’ll get them out into the swamp.”

Fog was reported in portions of Central Florida, but it's not known if weather played a role in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.clickorlando.com

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Another fatal Cirrus accident ..... beyond conicedence.

Anonymous said...

except that there were not fatalities .... good try though

Anonymous said...

Alan and Wendy Kanabay (although not fatal) are still in Level II Trauma Center. Prayers and thoughts, please. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

They're not out of the woods yet --- the next few months will tell us whether or not they'll fully recover.

A moment of silence for this well-loved couple.