Friday, October 13, 2017

Cessna 182H Skylane, N8338S, registered to and operated by Aero Newton Inc: Fatal accident occurred October 12, 2017 near Las Cruces International Airport (KLRU), Las Cruces, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Aero Newtown Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N8338S


NTSB Identification: CEN18FA009

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 12, 2017 in Las Cruces, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 182H, registration: N8338S
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On October 12, 2017, about 2015 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182H airplane, N8338S, impacted terrain near Las Cruces, New Mexico. The flight instructor and student rated pilot were both fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aero Newton Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight.


Initial reports from local agencies indicated that the night instructional flight was returning to land at the Las Cruces International Airport, (KLRU) Las Cruces, New Mexico, when it collided with terrain under unknown circumstances. A post-impact fire ensued.


The initial impact point consisted of damage to low bushes and outer portions of the left wingtip. The wreckage path followed a general 217° heading. The airplane continued along the wreckage path, coming to rest about 275 ft from the damaged bushes. A post impact fire consumed a majority of the cockpit and fuselage. All major airplane components were located at the accident site. The airplane wreckage was documented on site, and then removed to a secure facility for further examination.



A preliminary review of radar data captured the airplane flying from the Truth or Consequences Airport (KTCS), Truth or Consequences, New Mexico and along Highway I-25 towards Las Cruces. The airplane maneuvered northeast of the KLRU airport, made several turns before it descended towards the terrain.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov 



David Hancock died in a plane crash while he was on a training flight just outside of the Las Cruces airport. 


LAS CRUCES - A plane crash in the desert northwest of Las Cruces on Thursday claimed the lives of two men, including a well-known pilot and aviation enthusiast who for years was a steadfast figure at the Las Cruces International Airport.

Morris Doug Newton, 77, of Las Cruces and David Glenn Hancock, 67, of El Paso died in the crash, which is under investigation by authorities. The two were the only occupants of the fixed wing, single-engine Cesna plane.

Authorities responded to the crash about 8:30 p.m, roughly four miles northeast of the city's airport in a "remote, mountainous area," according to the New Mexico State Police.

Officials said they don't yet know the cause of the crash.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford says a post-crash fire destroyed the aircraft.

Federal authorities were expected to arrive Friday to investigate the cause of the crash, according to the state police.

A state police spokesman said he didn't know why the two were flying Thursday evening.

'Mayor of the airport'

Newton, a long-time pilot, was a member of the city's Airport Advisory Board, a panel that gave input to city officials about operations at the city-owned airport west of Las Cruces.

Over the years, Newton has held a variety of roles in connection to local aviation, including as the manager of an aviation-services business and as a flight instructor. But what remained constant was his passion for planes and for flight, according to friends and colleagues. He flew nearly every day.

"I used to refer to him as the mayor of the airport," said airport Manager Lisa Murphy. "He knew everyone; he knew everything that was going on. He really cared about the airport."

Newton had a close-call in May 2010, when a single-engine plane he was piloting crashed near the Las Cruces airport. He sustained injuries to his head but made a recovery, according to Sun-News archives.

Newton had multiple types of flight certifications from the Federal Aviation Administration, according to that organization's website. He was a member of the Las Cruces Experimental Aircraft Association, a group that focused on designing, building and restoring aircraft. The organization held monthly breakfasts, where Newton became known for his omelet-making skills.

A lifelong passion

Murphy said Newton was a true flight enthusiast. He'd make a point of taking time out of his schedule to show aircraft to school children visiting the airport for field trips.

"He'd been a pilot his whole life," she said. "He was a really good pilot. He was kind of a natural at it. Everything he did was aviation-related."

According to a state website, Newton was president of Aero Hangars Inc., which formed earlier this year. He was also president of a second corporation, Aero Newton Inc., created in 2013.

Prior to that, Newton was manager of Adventure Aviation, an airplane fueling station and café at the Las Cruces airport. That business dissolved, but Newton maintained involvement at the airport.

Las Crucen Chris Franzoy, a student of Newton's, said he began flying with him in 2013. Franzoy has had a flight license since the early '90s but wanted to obtain further certifications. Franzoy said Newton was "definitely one of the best instructors I've ever had."

"His passion was in flying," Franzoy said. "It showed. He was a very good pilot and very good teacher. I know that whatever happened in that plane crash — I'm sure Doug did everything he could to prevent it. We're sure going to miss him."

'Big void'

Aero Newton was a flying club, in which members shared the costs of keeping and maintaining airplanes, Franzoy said.

Franzoy said Newton "did his due diligence every week making sure the aircraft were up to par and safe for flying."

"This was just a very unfortunate incident," he said.

Murphy agreed Newton's death will leave a "big void" in the local aviation community.

"He'll definitely be missed," she said.

Newton is survived by his wife, Elsie, who lives in Las Cruces.

Fourth in three years

Thursday's crash marks the fourth fatal plane crash in the vicinity of Las Cruces International Airport in the past three years.

In August 2014, a Cessna 421C crashed just after takeoff. Killed were the pilot, 29-year-old Freddy Martinez of El Paso, Fredrick Green, 59, a Las Cruces man being transported for cancer treatment; flight paramedic Tauren Summers, 27, of El Paso; and flight nurse Monica Chavez, 35, of Las Cruces. The crash was later attributed to a fueling error.

In November 2014, Tyler Francis, 29, the pilot and only occupant of a home-built Ross Vans Aircraft RV-3, was pronounced dead at the scene of a crash near the airport. Francis owned Francis Aviation.

In August 2015, David Tokoph, 64, died from injuries sustained in a plane crash at the Las Cruces airport. Tokoph lived in El Paso and held an international flight speed record.



EL PASO, Texas (KFOX14) — The pilot of the plane that crashed Thursday in Las Cruces used to be a teacher at Coronado High School in El Paso.

David Glenn Hancock was very close to finishing the steps to get his pilot's license. His family said he had to do a 30-minute night flight with his instructor. They had just taken off from the Las Cruces Airport when they crashed.


His son, David Glenn Hancock Jr., says family was the focus of his father's life, between coaching every Little League team they joined and treating his family to UTEP football season tickets for years.


Hancock was married to his wife, Myrna Hancock, for more than 45 years. Together, they had two sons and three grandchildren. Hancock Jr. said family was the focus of his dad’s life. He coached every team and little league team Hancock Jr. and his brother ever played on, and all of his vacations were wrapped around his kids, wife and grandkids.


"He grew up very, very poor. He worked hard. Put himself through college and became an educator. He taught advanced-placement economics at Coronado High School for about 10 years,” Hancock Jr. said. “A lot of his students went on to tier one-one universities, Ivy League Schools. Some of them are in political office. Some of them are engineers at the Ferrari factory. Very high-profile students, so he added a lot of value to the El Paso community."


Hancock's family said he was an incredible athlete, even at 67 years old. He ran marathons, kept his hair long and fought for social justice.


“He was a great athlete. He was 67 years old and he still competed running half-marathons and marathons all around the country. He was always very athletic, very fit, very conscious of that. That’s something he’d want to be said about him,” Hancock Jr. said. “He was a family man, but he was a social anarchist at heart. He was always kind of a revolutionary and a liberal, and always stood up for human rights. He always carried the 1960s with him. He always wore his hair long and was always looking for social justice.”


Hancock Jr. explained that his father was piloting the plane while his instructor rode along.


“They had just taken off, so they were only a few miles north of the airport. He was finishing up his final training to get his pilot’s license. They had to do a 30-minute flight at night just to check instruments. The Sheriff said they put a distress call to a National Guard helicopter. So they were communicating a Mayday call to the helicopter,” he explained.


Hancock is survived by his wife, Myrna Hancock, his sons, David Glenn Hancock Jr. and Christopher Hancock, his daughters-in-law, Karen Hancock and Andrea Hancock, and his three grandkids, David Glenn Hancock the III, Joshua Hancock and Allison Hancock. He is originally from North Texas, being born in Dublin, Texas and graduating from Stephenville High School.


http://kfoxtv.com

Las Cruces, NM - ABC-7's New Mexico Mobile Newsroom has learned two men were killed in a plane crash north of the Las Cruces International Airport. 


Investigators identified the men killed as 67-year-old David Glenn Hancock of El Paso and 77-year-old Morris Douglas Newton of Las Cruces.


NMSP spokesman Carl Christiansen said the two victims were the only occupants of the single-engine plane. 


Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are at the scene.


Las Cruces Police said Thursday night the Cessna 182H Skylane crashed over rough terrain.


State police, Border Patrol, and the Dona Ana County Sheriff's Office initially responded to the scene. 


Rescue crews had to use all-terrain vehicles to reach the crash site in a canyon. 


The site was spotted by an Air National Guard helicopter crew.


Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford told the Associated Press a post-crash fire destroyed the aircraft.


Story and video ➤ http://www.kvia.com


DONA ANA COUNTY, N.M. (KFOX14) —  Authorities have released the names of the people who died in a plane crash in Dona Ana County.

The plane crash was reported near Las Cruces Thursday around 8:30 p.m., New Mexico State Police said.


The small plane crashed about four miles northeast of the Las Cruces airport, according to Carl Christiansen, with NMSP.


The single-engine Cessna caught fire upon impact, police said.


They said David Glenn Hancock, 67, of El Paso, and Morris Douglas Newton, 77, of Las Cruces, were found dead at the scene.


Authorities don't know what caused the crash.


The National Traffic Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have been notified.


Officers at the scene used ATVs to get there because of the terrain, Christiansen said.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://kfoxtv.com





Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN10LA282
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 30, 2010 in Las Cruces, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/21/2010
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration: N2723U
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The engine lost partial power shortly after takeoff. During the forced landing, the airplane went through a chain link fence before coming to rest against a sand berm and mesquite tree. There were other documented reports of partial power failures involving this airplane. The engine was partially disassembled and examined. The number 5 cylinder exhaust valve was found to be stuck open. A clear, unidentified liquid was found in the fuel line. A significant amount of water was drained from the fuel system, mostly from the left tank. It was reported that the airplane had sat outside during the winter in several rain storms. Maintenance personnel reported a considerable amount of water was drained from the right fuel tank during the most recent annual inspection.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to fuel starvation as a result of water contamination in the fuel, and the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection. Contributing the accident was an inoperative number 5 cylinder exhaust valve.

On May 30, 2010, approximately 1500 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 172D, N2723U, registered to and operated by Adventure Leasing, was substantially damaged when it struck a chain link fence and impacted terrain following a partial loss of power shortly after taking off from Las Cruces International Airport (LRU), Las Cruces, New Mexico. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 without a flight plan. The pilot was seriously injured and two passengers were uninjured. The local flight had just originated.

According to the pilot’s accident report, the pre-flight inspection, engine run-up, and takeoff were normal. At 450 feet altitude, the engine lost partial power. The pilot attempted to land in an area that had recently been used as a staging area for runway construction. The airplane touched down and went through a chain link fence before coming to rest against a sand berm and mesquite tree. 

FAA inspectors examined the airplane on June 1, 2010, and the airplane was moved to a local hangar and secured. Throttle and the mixture controls were both full forward, and the flaps and flap handle were in the up position. There was very little water or contamination in fuel samples taken. This was the flight of the airplane since its annual inspection. 

FAA inspectors received other reports of other partial power failures involving N2723U. Some of these failures were attributed to water in the fuel and others were unexplained. A review of the airplane’s maintenance records and pertinent Airworthiness Directives revealed anomalies with the airplane carburetor. The carburetor was retained by FAA .


On June 28, 2010, the engine was partially disassembled and examined. The top spark plugs showed signs of a rich mixture setting, and the pilot confirmed that he had moved the mixture to rich while troubleshooting the engine power loss. The number 5 cylinder exhaust valve was found to be stuck open. A clear, unidentified liquid was found in the fuel line. A significant amount of water was drained from the fuel system, mostly from the left tank. It was reported that the airplane had sat outside during the winter in several rain storms. Maintenance personnel reported a considerable amount of water was drained from the right fuel tank during the most recent annual inspection.

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