Saturday, July 1, 2017

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 421C Golden Eagle, N2655B; fatal accident occurred July 01, 2017 in Catawba, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Cessna; Wichita, Kansas
Continental; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N2655B


Location: Catawba, WI
Accident Number: CEN17FA248
Date & Time: 07/01/2017, 0153 CDT
Registration: N2655B
Aircraft: CESSNA 421C
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 6 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 1, 2017, about 0153 central daylight time, a Cessna 421C airplane, N2655B, was destroyed during an in-flight breakup near Catawba, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot and five passengers sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to Sky King Flying Service, Inc., and was being operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Dark night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated about 0025 from Waukegan National Airport (UGN), Waukegan, Illinois, and was enroute to Warroad International Memorial Airport (RRT), Warroad, Minnesota. 

According to radar data and air traffic control communications information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane was flying about 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl) when the pilot checked in with Minneapolis Air Route Traffic Control Center at 0117. At 0148, the pilot reported lightning off his left wing. The controller advised the pilot that the weather appeared to be about 35 to 40 miles away and that the airplane should be well clear of it. The pilot responded to the controller that he had onboard weather radar and stated that it "looks like we'll clear it nicely." After the discussion about the weather, there were no further communications from the pilot. At 0152, radar data showed the airplane at 10,400 ft msl, and at 0153, radar data showed the airplane at 9,400 ft msl in a descending right turn. Radar contact was lost shortly thereafter. There were no distress calls from the pilot. Search and rescue operations were started immediately after radar contact was lost.

A witness who was driving home from work reported that he heard engine noise, then did not hear engine noise, then heard engine noise again. He then saw what he thought were the lights of an airplane, and then the lights went out. Another witness, who did not see the airplane, reported that she heard a loud sound. Both witnesses were in the vicinity of the accident location about the time the accident occurred.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied:
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  2335 hours (Total, all aircraft), 70 hours (Total, this make and model), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on August 11, 2016. The pilot's logbook was found in the wreckage. His total flight experience was 2,335 hours, with 463 hours of total night experience. No flight time was logged between October 21, 2016, and May 5, 2017. He had 11.2 hours logged within the last 60 days before the accident, with 1.7 hours of night time, logged on May 7, 2017. His first flight logged in the accident airplane was on September 29, 2015. He logged 70.4 hours total flight experience in the accident airplane, with 7.5 hours of night experience. His most recent flight logged before the accident flight was June 16, 2017, in the accident airplane.

His most recent flight review and instrument proficiency check were completed on June 15, 2017. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N2655B
Model/Series: 421C C 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1959
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 421C0698
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: GTSIO-520-L7
Registered Owner: SKY KING FLYING SERVICE INC
Rated Power: 375 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The pilot was the owner of the airplane. Review of the available airframe, propeller, and engine logbooks revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on September 25, 2015. An entry on the annual inspection document stated that, "aircraft checks satisfactory," and was signed by the pilot on October 10, 2016. No maintenance discrepancies were noted in the available maintenance records.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: PBH, 1496 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0135 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Waukegan, IL (UGN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Warroad, MN (RRT)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0028 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Price County Airport (PBH), Phillips, Wisconsin, was located about 15 miles east of the accident site. The 0135, weather observation included wind from 360° at 3 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, a broken ceiling at 600 ft above ground level, temperature 14°C, dew point 14°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86 inches of mercury. Regional weather radar did not indicate any convection or thunderstorms near to the airplane's flightpath. The accident site was located about 25 miles east of convective activity with no coincidental lightning. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 45.555278, -90.495000 (est) 

The accident site was located within densely vegetated terrain intersected by a road, with debris scattered on either side of and along the road surface in an area with a radius about 1/4 mile. Tree scars and ground impressions indicated that the main section of the fuselage impacted terrain in a nose-low attitude. The fuselage was found upright and oriented northeast. Both wings were found separated outboard of their respective nacelles. The empennage was not attached to the fuselage and was located about 1,200 ft from the main wreckage. The distribution of the wreckage was consistent with an in-flight breakup of the airplane. Due to the dense vegetation, muddy terrain, and limited horizontal visibility of the accident site, a drone was used to locate parts of the wreckage that could not be found on foot.


Figure 1. Wreckage Distribution

The empennage was separated from the fuselage and located about 1,200 ft from the main wreckage. The rudder was found in three pieces and its trim tab was missing. Most of the vertical stabilizer was missing, except for the top 1.5 ft. The right side of horizontal stabilizer was found largely intact with its leading edge bent downward about 45°. The underside of the horizontal stabilizer exhibited wrinkling. Only a small portion of the right elevator tip was found, and the right elevator trim tab was missing. The entire left side of the horizontal stabilizer, most of the left elevator, and the left elevator trim tab were missing. The outboard portion of the right rear spar was found in the vicinity of the empennage components with no structure attached.

The left engine, serial number 825104-R, was found separated from the airframe and completely submerged in a 9-ft deep crater about 75 ft east of the fuselage. A sump pump was used to reduce the water level in the crater so that the engine could be recovered. The propeller assembly for this engine was not visible and could not be examined at the accident site. A large portion of the engine nacelle was found in the same crater.

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site for further examination. The left horizontal stabilizer; about 3 ft of the elevator and trim tab, and about 5 ft of the outboard left elevator and trim tab were not located.

Cockpit

The flap position could not be determined. The flap handle was found in the "UP" position. The gyroscope rotors for the #1 attitude indicator, #1 horizontal situation indicator (HSI), #2 directional gyro, and #1 turn-and-bank indicator were disassembled and examined. All rotors exhibited signs of spindle rotation. The landing gear and flap handles were both found in the retracted position. The left engine fuel selector handle was found in the right main tank position. The right engine fuel selector handle was found in the right main tank position. The right fuel selector valve was in crossfeed position. The left fuel selector valve was not observed due to impact damage.

Fuselage

The fuselage exhibited severe impact damage and was mostly in one piece with lateral and longitudinal tears in its skin from the forward pressure bulkhead to the end of the fuselage. The fuselage exhibited lateral tears in multiple places and a lateral tear along the right side. Eight seats were found installed in the aircraft.

Left Wing

The left engine nacelle was separated from the left wing about wing station (WS) 87 and WS 110. The left wing from WS 110 outboard was intact. The left wing's leading edge exhibited downward bending and diagonal creases in the area of WS 110 to WS 119. It exhibited upward bending at the trailing edge in the area of WS 110 to WS 119. About 2 ft of the inboard portion of the left aileron remained attached to the wing, and the outboard section of the aileron was missing. The left flap was connected to the nacelle via the push/pull rods, but the flap structure was missing. The outboard left flap track remained attached to the wing. The left speed brake was attached to its wing panel. The wing panel was attached to the wing. The left wing's nacelle was found with the left engine in a crater.

Right Wing

The right engine nacelle remained attached to the fuselage via control cables and wiring. Both wing spars were separated between the fuselage and the nacelle. The outboard portion of the right wing was separated about WS 110 and was intact. The right wing's leading edge exhibited downward bending and diagonal creases in the area of WS 110 to WS 119. It exhibited upward bending at the trailing edge in the area of WS 110 to WS 119. The right aileron separated from the wing in one piece. The right flap was separated from the wing and was not present. Both flap tracks were separated from the wing. The right speed brake was attached to its wing panel.

Empennage

The elevator trim tab actuator extension measured 1.8 inches, consistent with an approximate 10° tab up position. The right horizontal stabilizer was bent down parallel to the chord line about butt line (BL) 20. The right horizontal stabilizer exhibited diagonal creasing from the leading edge to trailing edge, inboard to outboard. The left horizontal stabilizer rear spar was attached from BL 0.0 outboard to BL 49; however, the left horizontal stabilizer structure from approximately BL 20 outboard was not found.

Flight Control Cables

Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the aft rudder bellcrank to the cockpit controls. Elevator control continuity was confirmed from the aft elevator bellcrank to the cockpit controls. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the aileron bellcrank in the fuselage and to the cable separations in the wings. Both left and right aileron cables exhibited tension overload separations near their respective wing separations.

Right Engine

Mud was washed from the engine to facilitate inspection. The intake manifold assembly was intact but was separated from the intake tubes for cylinder Nos. 1, 3, and 5 due to impact forces. The assembly was removed to facilitate further engine inspection. The intake manifold tubes were intact and remained attached to each cylinder. The turbocharger and associated controls separated and remained attached to the airframe nacelle. The engine-mounted exhaust collectors were impact damaged and forced upward against the rocker covers. The turbocharger compressor blades and turbine discharge blades would not turn manually.

The cylinders remained attached at their respective bases, but the lower portion of each cylinder was destroyed by impact forces. All pushrod tubes and pushrods were impact damaged. Cylinder No. 6 exhibited impact damage to the cylinder head, which separated from the barrel. All rocker covers remained attached except on cylinder No. 6. A placard was attached to one rocker cover per cylinder indicating that GAMI fuel injectors were installed. Cylinder Nos. 1-5 were inspected using an electronic lighted borescope. All valves were intact and exhibited normal combustion deposits. All cylinders and piston domes appeared normal. The top sparkplugs were removed and inspected. When compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart, the cylinder Nos. 1-5 sparkplugs appeared normal in coloration and wear. The No. 6 cylinder sparkplug was contaminated and could not be inspected.

The left and right magnetos separated but remained in place connected to their respective ignition harnesses. The magneto mounting rings were broken at the magneto hold washer. The ignition harness leads were cut and impact damaged. The magnetos were not tested for operation. The engine could not be rotated manually due to impact damage to the oil sump, which bound the crankshaft. The oil sump was mostly destroyed and was crushed upward around the crankshaft throws. The oil pump remained attached and was crushed upward. The oil cooler was impact damaged. The oil filter separated and was not recovered.

The engine-driven fuel pump separated and was attached to fuel hoses and the mounting ring was damaged. The drive coupling remained in the displaced fuel pump gear. The gear and coupling were removed from the crankcase mounting and inspected. The drive coupling was intact but bent. The fuel pump was disassembled and inspected. The fuel pump rotated smoothly when manually driven. The impeller blades were intact. No fuel was present in the fuel pump cavity. The fuel manifold valve and fuel lines remained attached and intact. The individual fuel lines were bent due to impact forces. The fuel metering unit and throttle body remained attached to the airframe nacelle.

The starter motor was not recovered. The starter adapter was attached and was impact damaged at the mount. The engine-driven alternator was impact damaged. The alternator mount was impact damaged, but the alternator remained in place. The instrument air pump separated and was not recovered. The instrument air pump drive remained attached to the accessory gear. The pump drive was impact damaged but intact. The propeller governor separated and was not recovered.

Left Engine

Mud was washed from the engine to facilitate inspection. The impact damaged intercooler was inspected. The manifold tubes separated at the attach points on each cylinder head and were not recovered. The engine-mounted exhaust collectors were impact damaged. The turbocharger compressor blades, and turbine discharge blades would not turn manually. The upper deck pressure system separated and was not recovered.

The cylinders remained attached at their respective bases. The cooling fins on the top and bottom of each cylinder were damaged. All pushrod tubes and pushrods were intact and in place, and all rocker covers remained attached. Placards on each cylinder indicated that GAMI fuel injectors were installed. All fuel injectors separated except those mounted in cylinder Nos. 1 and 5. A lighted electronic borescope inspection was performed. The pistons in cylinder Nos. 5 and 6 were too high in each cylinder to allow inspection. The engine could not be rotated manually. Cylinder Nos. 3 and 4 were full of mud and could not be inspected. Cylinder Nos. 1 and 2 intake and exhaust valves were intact and exhibited normal combustion signatures. The top sparkplugs were removed and inspected. Sparkplugs from cylinder Nos. 4, 5, and 6 were damaged and the barrels separated from the base. When compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart, the sparkplugs from cylinder Nos. 1, 3, and 5 appeared normal in coloration and wear. The sparkplugs from cylinder Nos. 2, 4, and 5 were contaminated with mud and could not be inspected.

The left magneto separated except for the mounting ring and a portion of the internal drive. The right magneto separated and was not recovered. The ignition harness leads were found cut and impact damaged. The oil sump was impact damaged and the left rear corner was breached. The oil pump was attached with impact damage and the pump gears were exposed. The oil cooler separated and was not recovered. The remote-mounted oil filter separated and was not recovered. The engine-driven fuel pump was attached and the fuel hoses and fittings were damaged. The fuel pump was removed and disassembled. The drive coupling was intact. The fuel pump could be manually rotated, but mud inside the pump housing resulted in rotation difficulty. The impeller blades were intact. No fuel was present in the fuel pump cavity. The fuel manifold valve and fuel lines separated and were not recovered. The fuel metering unit and throttle body remained attached to the airframe nacelle.

The starter motor separated but was recovered. The starter adapter was attached and had impact damage to the starter motor mount. The engine driven alternator separated and was not recovered. The instrument air pump was not recovered. The instrument air pump drive remained attached to the accessory gear. The pump drive was inspected and was intact. The propeller governor separated and was not recovered.

Teardown Examinations of Engines, Turbochargers, and Propellers

Both engines and their respective turbocharger components were transported to Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama, for teardown and analytical inspections. Teardown examinations of both the left and right engines showed heavy impact and water damage. No preimpact anomalies were noted during the examinations of the engines. Teardown examination of the turbochargers exhibited characteristics of normal operation with no discrepancies noted that would have prevented or degraded normal turbocharger operation before the in-flight breakup/impact. Damage to both engines and their respective turbochargers was consistent with high impact forces. For more detailed information, see the engine teardown and turbocharger examination report in the public docket for this accident.

The propeller assemblies were transported to McCauley Propellers, Wichita, Kansas, for teardown and analytical inspections. Teardown examinations of both left and right propellers showed damage resulting from the impact sequence. There were no indications of any type of propeller failure or malfunction before the breakup and impact. Both the left and right propellers displayed signatures consistent with rotation at impact. Exact engine power levels were not determined. Both propellers displayed impact signature markings or component positions indicating that the blades were operating at about a 15° reference angle measured at the 30-inch blade radial station during the impact sequence. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office, Minneapolis, Minnesota, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was blunt trauma.

Toxicology testing performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory identified no drugs, ethanol, or carbon monoxide.

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA248
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 01, 2017 in Catawba, WI
Aircraft: CESSNA 421C, registration: N2655B
Injuries: 6 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 1, 2017, approximately 0153 central daylight time (CDT), a Cessna 421C multi-engine airplane, N2655B, registered to Sky King Flying Service Inc., Wilmington, Delaware, and operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it impacted the ground after an uncontrolled descent and in-flight breakup near Catawba, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot and five passengers sustained fatal injuries. The personal cross-country flight was being conducted under the provisions Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Dark night visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed in the area and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The flight originated about 0028 from Waukegan, Illinois, and was enroute to Warroad International Memorial Airport (RRT), Warroad, Minnesota. 

According to family members, the intent of the flight was to fly to RRT, and then the 6 occupants were to be picked up by a guide company for a fishing trip in Winnipeg, Canada. A flight plan found in the pilot's onboard flight bag showed documents pertaining to the flight to RRT.

According to FAA ATC and radar records, the airplane was flying about 10,000 MSL when the pilot queried the ATC controller about weather conditions in the vicinity. Preliminary radar data showed the airplane between 10,000 - 10,500 feet in a slight left turn, and then a descending right turn. After the right turn, radio contact was lost and the airplane descended rapidly. There were no distress calls from the pilot. According to preliminary weather data, the airplane was flying in VMC weather conditions when radar contact was lost. Search and rescue operations were started immediately after radar contact was lost.

The nearest weather reporting facility to the accident was located about 15 miles east of the accident site in Phillips, Wisconsin. Price County Airport (PBH). PBH reported visual meteorological conditions in the vicinity of the accident. PBH METAR 010635Z AUTO 36003KT 10SM BKN006 14/14 A2986 RMK AO2 T01350135. Regional weather radar did not report any convection or thunderstorms coincident with the airplanes flight path, or near to the flight path. The accident site was located about 25 miles to the east of convective activity with no coincidental lightning.

A person who was driving home from work reported that he heard engine noise, then did not hear engine noise, then heard engine noise again. Then, he saw what he thought were lights of a airplane, and then the lights went out. Another witness (who did not see the airplane), reported that she heard a loud sound. Both witnesses were in the vicinity of the accident location about the same time the accident occurred. 

According to local authorities (Price County Sheriff Department), a call was received in their dispatch that an airplane was missing in the area. The Sheriff dispatched personnel to the location provided and wreckage debris was found on Highway 111 near Catawba. The main wreckage was found in heavily wooded and muddy terrain, about 900 feet off the highway, at grid coordinates N45°33.3147' W090°29.6990'. Tree stands varied from 15-80 feet high with heavy brush and a small stream nearby. Emergency response was initiated and the NTSB/FAA were notified.

Initial examination and documentation of the accident site by the NTSB showed that the debris area encompassed an area of about ¼ mile. Tree scars and ground impressions indicated that the main section of the fuselage impacted terrain in a nose-low attitude. The empennage was not attached to the fuselage and located about 1,200 feet from the main wreckage. One of the engines was found in a 9-foot deep crater. Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane had broken apart prior to impact.

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site and transported to a secure facility in Lakeside, Minnesota, for detailed examinations which were conducted by the NTSB on July 3-4, 2017. The engines crated and shipped to Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama, for examination at a later date.

Thomas DeMauro (center front) and Charles Tomlitz (back right)  Kyle DeMauro (center back) 


Thomas and Kyle DeMauro


The Price County Sheriff Department has identified the six victims of a deadly plane crash that happened early Saturday morning. Their names and ages are listed below.

Kevin James King, 70, of Bensenville, IL
James Francis, 63, of Norco, CA
Kyle Demauro, 21, of Bensenville, IL
Thomas Demauro, 56, of Bensenville, IL
Charles Tomlitz, 69, of Addison, IL
George Tomlitz, 45, from Brookfield, IL



PHILLIPS, Wis. -- A small airplane that went down in northern Wisconsin fell apart in the air, killing the six people onboard, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday.

The Cessna 421 that crashed at 3:21 a.m. Saturday left from Waukegan, Illinois, and was flying to Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba, NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss said.

"The debris field suggested an in-flight break up," Weiss said.

Lt. Gabe Lind at the Price County Sheriff's Office said the debris field from the crash stretched about a quarter mile from a heavily wooded area onto a state highway. 

The six people killed were identified Monday as 70-year-old Kevin James King, 56-year-old Thomas DeMauro, 21-year-old Kyle DeMauro, 63-year-old James Francis, 69-year-old Charles Tomlitz and 45-year-old George Tomlitz. The sheriff's office has said they were headed to Canada for a fishing trip. 

The DeMauros and King are from Bensenville, Illinois. Francis is from Norco, California. Charles Tomlitz is from Addison, Illinois, and George Tomlitz is from Brookfield, Illinois. Authorities did not say how they knew each other or the DeMauros relation to each other.

NTSB investigators say there was a discussion between the pilot of the plane and air traffic controllers about "local weather phenomenon" in Catawba, Wisconsin, which is near the crash site just southwest of the city of Phillips. Soon after, the aircraft dropped off radar.

Weiss said investigators are still trying to determine what type of weather the plane encountered and whether it caused the crash.

Thomas DeMauro was a physical education teacher at Tioga Elementary School in Bensenville, Illinois, and Charles Tomlitz was a maintenance director for the district, according to a Facebook post from the school.

"Mr. DeMauro and Mr. Tomlitz will be missed by all the Tioga Community," the school's co-principals wrote in the post on the Tioga Elementary School Facebook page. 

In a statement to CBS affiliate WSAW-TV, the DeMauro family expressed gratitude for the outpouring of support.

"We would also like to express our heartfelt condolences to the other families affected by this tragedy. Tom was our beloved son, husband, father, brother, uncle, friend, teacher and coach," the statement said. "Kyle was our dear son, brother, grandson, nephew and friend; a compassionate young man who had a promising future."

WSAW-TV reports that the on-site investigation into the plane crash is over Monday. The wreckage was removed from the area and taken to another location for further investigation.

NTSB will likely release a preliminary report about the investigation within 10 days. Final reports, including what caused the crash, will likely be released within 12 to 18 months.

King was the only certified pilot on board the plane, according to WSAW-TV. He was rated to fly single engine and multi-engine planes, as well as instrument airplanes.

According to the FAA, the plane is owned by "Sky King Flying Service" based in Wilmington, Delaware. The plane was registered in 2011 and the registration was set to expire on November 30, 2017.  

Sandy Jensen, owner of the nearby Happy Daze bar and restaurant, said she provided food for firefighters at the scene of the crash, WSAW-TV reports.

"Made up 35 burgers, cheeseburgers and fresh cheese curds we sent over, and some parade candy, because it's the Fourth of July," she told the station.

"That's what the world's all about is people helping people," she added. 

http://www.cbsnews.com







A small airplane that went down in northern Wisconsin fell apart in the air, killing the six people onboard, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday.

The Cessna 421C Golden Eagle that crashed at 3:21 a.m. Saturday left from Waukegan, Illinois, and was flying to Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba, NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss said.

"The debris field suggested an in-flight break up," Weiss said.

Lt. Gabe Lind at the Price County Sheriff's Office said the debris field from the crash stretched about a quarter mile from a heavily wooded area onto a state highway.

The six people killed were identified Monday as 70-year-old Kevin James King, 56-year-old Thomas DeMauro, 21-year-old Kyle DeMauro, 63-year-old James Francis, 69-year-old Charles Tomlitz, and 45-year-old George Tomlitz. The sheriff's office has said they were headed to Canada for a fishing trip.

The DeMauros and King are from Bensenville, Illinois. Francis is from Norco, California. Charles Tomlitz is from Addison, Illinois, and George Tomlitz is from Brookfield, Illinois. Authorities did not say how they knew each other or the DeMauros relation to each other.

NTSB investigators say there was a discussion between the pilot of the plane and air traffic controllers about "local weather phenomenon" in Catawba, Wisconsin, which is near the crash site just southwest of the city of Phillips. Soon after, the aircraft dropped off radar.

Weiss said investigators are still trying to determine what type of weather the plane encountered and whether it caused the crash.

Thomas DeMauro was a physical education teacher at Tioga Elementary School in Bensenville, Illinois, and Charles Tomlitz was a maintenance director for the district, according to a Facebook post from the school.

"Mr. DeMauro and Mr. Tomlitz will be missed by all the Tioga Community," the school's co-principals wrote in the post on the Tioga Elementary School Facebook page.

In a statement to WSAW-TV, the DeMauro family expressed gratitude for the outpouring of support.

"We would also like to express our heartfelt condolences to the other families affected by this tragedy. Tom was our beloved son, husband, father, brother, uncle, friend, teacher and coach," the statement said. "Kyle was our dear son, brother, grandson, nephew and friend; a compassionate young man who had a promising future."


A teacher and maintenance director for Bensenville Elementary School District 2 were killed early Saturday when a small plane they were flying to Canada crashed in northern Wisconsin, authorities said Sunday.

The Cessna 421C Golden Eagle crashed about 3:21 a.m. Saturday after suddenly losing altitude near Catawba, Wisconsin, according to the Price County Sheriff's Office. Wreckage of the plane was found near the intersection of U.S. Highway 8 and State Highway 111, the sheriff's office reported.

The sheriff, Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

A statement posted on the Facebook page of Tioga Elementary School in Bensenville states a teacher and a second district employee were among the victims.

"We are very sad to inform you that Thomas DeMauro, Tioga PE teacher and Charles (Chuck) Tomlitz, GCA Maintenance Director for BSD2 were killed in a plane crash in route to a Canadian fishing trip," reads the statement signed by Tioga co-principals Carlos Azcoitia and Jeff Kersten. "The plane crashed early (Saturday) morning after rapidly losing altitude, according to police. Mr. DeMauro and Mr. Tomlitz will be missed by all the Tioga Community."

District 2 Superintendent James Stelter and several board members did not immediately return calls or emails seeking comment Sunday.

Price County Coroner James Dalbesio, III would not confirm the number or identity of any victims Sunday afternoon, saying his office was still working to notify family members.

The Cessna 421C, a twin-engine plane capable of carrying up to seven passengers, took off from Waukegan headed to Winnipeg, Manitoba, with six people aboard, according to the Duluth News Tribune. There were no survivors.

A GoFundMe online fundraiser has been established for the families of DeMauro and Tomlitz at www.gofundme.com/tom-chuck-memorials. As of late Sunday afternoon, more than $5,800 had been donated.

http://www.dailyherald.com




A Cessna 421C Golden Eagle that took off from Chicago early Saturday morning crashed in northern Wisconsin, killing six people on board, police said. 

Two of the victims were identified on Saturday night as Bensenville School District employees, according to NBC 5. Charles Tomlitz, a P.E. teacher at Tioga Elementary, and Thomas DeMauro, a maintenance director with the district, were among the six killed when the plane crashed at approximately 3:21 a.m. Saturday morning. 

"Very sad news, my condolences to the families of these men," former Bensenville student Tanya Scheibe said on Facebook. "I have great memories of classes with Mr. DeMauro. I wish everyone well during this difficult time." 

The Price County Sheriff's Office says the crash occurred near the city of Phillips. The sheriff's office says the plane had left from Chicago and was heading to Canada on a fishing trip.

Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt told NBC-affiliate WFJW that police could not release the identities of the remaining four victims until families were notified. The sheriff did confirm that all six victims of the crash were adults. 

The NTSB and FAA are investigating the crash, WFJW reports. Debris from the plane scattered around a quarter-mile radius from the crash site, and anyone who finds debris is encouraged to call police. 


http://www.nbcchicago.com

PRICE COUNTY, Wis. (WSAW) -- During a press conference Sunday, investigators revealed six people were killed in the Price County plane crash. At this point, they're not releasing names, ages or their relationships. The Price County Sheriff did confirm they're all adults.


Early Saturday morning, the sheriff's office received a call from the Air Marine Operations Center that an aircraft dropped altitude quickly and radio contact was lost. The sheriff's office said the plane had left from Chicago and was heading to Canada on a fishing trip.


National Transportation Safety Board investigators said there was a discussion between the pilot of the plane and air traffic controllers about "local weather phenomenon." At about 1:53 a.m., the aircraft dropped off radar.


Wreckage from the plane was found in the area of State Highway 111 and U.S. Highway 8 in the Township of Harmony.


"We're dealing with things that people just don't want to talk about or see," Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt said.


Several departments responded to help with the scene. But a surprising amount of help has also come from around the community. Schmidt said crews turned to someone from the Price County airport who owned a private helicopter. Crews were then able to view the plane wreckage from above.


"We're fortunate to have someone with a helicopter, and we were able to locate the compartment of a fuselage and the passenger compartment of an airplane," Sheriff Schmidt explained.


And while some assistance may have come in the form of an aircraft, other kinds of help came in a different form. Sandy Jensen owns Happy Daze bar and restaurant in the Village of Kennan, just outside of where crews are trying to figure out what happened in the crash. She said when some firefighters called her restaurant for help, she knew just what to do.


"Made up 35 burgers, cheeseburgers, and fresh cheese curds we sent over, and some parade candy, because it's the Fourth of July," Jensen explained.


"They went above and beyond," Schmidt added.


Jensen said she was simply doing the right thing.


"It's just what people should do," Jensen explained. "That's what the world's all about is people helping people. When people have hard times, we've been in hard times and our community has helped us, and it's just the right thing to do."


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are assisting with the investigation. Right now, they don't know what caused the crash, as the investigation is in the 'fact-finding' stage. The NTSB will be inspecting the wreckage as it lays in the field Sunday and likely Monday.


The plane was a Cessna 421 and investigators said the pilot was certified to fly it.


The NTSB is asking that if you heard anything or have come across any wreckage that you give them a call.


http://www.wsaw.com



CATAWBA - Sunday 7/2-- Six people died in a plane crash in Price County early Saturday morning, the Price County Sheriff confirms. 

Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt could not reveal their identities until the families are notified. Sheriff Schmidt did confirm the individuals were adults. 

Crews responded to the crash around 3 a.m. Saturday morning. It happened just west of Highway 111 and a few miles north of Highway 8. 

The FAA and the NTSB are investigating the crash, including its cause. An investigator with the NTSB says the last time a control center had contact with the plane was just before 2 a.m. Saturday. He says the pilot was up-to-date on license and requirements to fly, and says he was qualified to fly the plane. 

The NTSB believes debris from the plan scattered around a quarter-mile radius. If you find parts of the plane, the NTSB wants you call police. 

Saturday 7/1 -- The Price County Sheriff's Office reported a plane crashed near Catawba this morning.

Price County Sheriff Office confirms there were no survivors on the crash. 

They could not confirm how many people were on the plane or their identities.

The department did release that the plane, a Cessna 421, took off from the Chicago area and was en route to Canada for a fishing trip.

It happened near Highway 111, which runs north and south between highways 8 and 13.

Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt s got a call at 3:21 a.m. Saturday from the Air Marine Operation Center. 

"This is kind of an unusual situation," said Schmidt. 

To help find the plane the sheriff's office called Zack, Don and Justin Arvold to help with their private helicopter.

"We were there to find the crash and help as much as we can," said Zack.

Schmidt said the main passenger compartment of the plane was found on the west side of Highway 111 in the woods. Other parts of the plane were found separately on the highway. 
  
"With parts of the plane on the road we weren't sure what was taking place," said Schmidt.

For people who aren't used to seeing these scenes, today was especially challenging. 

"It's not an easy thing to swallow it's hard, it's tough, there's no really words for it," said Zack. 

The Price County Sheriff's Office, Prentice, Phillips, Kennan, Catawba and about six other departments were at the scene. 

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board along with the Price County Sheriff's Office and Coroner's office will continue the investigation. 

The Wisconsin State Patrol blocked all north and southbound lanes for several miles of Highway 111 for most of the day.

The roads were cleared just after 9 p.m.

The FAA, NTSB will continue the investigation along with the Price County Sheriff's Office.




PRICE COUNTY (WAOW) - Six people are dead after a Cessna 421 airplane flying from Illinois to Canada crashed in a wooded area off Highway 111 in Catawba early Saturday morning, according to Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt. 

It happened at around 1:53 a.m. Saturday. 

Officials from the FAA and the NTSB were on scene to investigate what caused the fatal crash.

A representative with NTSB said the debris field spreads over a quarter-mile. 

Representatives from the NTSB said they need to gather all parts of the plane to determine the cause of the crash. Residents in the area are asked to be on the lookout for any parts of the plane and immediately contact authorities if they find anything.

The pilot of the plane was allowed to fly and was up to date on all of their certifications, the NTSB said. 

The names of the six victims are not being released until all families are notified. 

The Price County Sheriff's tells Newsline 9 that a plane crashed near Catawba Saturday morning. 

It happened near Short Cut Rd. at Highway 111 around 3:30 a.m.

Price County Sheriff's Lt. Gabe Lind said there were no survivors from the crash but it is not being released how many people were on board. Lind said authorities were made aware of the crash after the Air Marine Operations Center contacted them and said an aircraft's altitude dropped quickly and radio contact was lost. 

"At this point we don't know any causes," Lind said. "We sent deputies to the area [on Highway 111] and they located a debris field."

The sheriff's department said the plane was traveling from Chicago to Canada for a fishing trip. 

Catawba has a population of around 100 and Saturday's crash sent a shockwave through the community. 

"People just been asking me what's going on. Have I heard anything," said Sarah Zugier, a store clerk in the Price County town. "Unbelievable. This is kind of a big event for this town." 

Jim Hanson lives in the area of where the plane crashed. He said he didn't hear anything. 

"A plane crash in this area? Yea, it just don't happen," he said.

Authorities said the plane is a Cessna 421. The model is capable of holding up to seven people.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash. A press conference will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday.

http://www.waow.com

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

"We're dealing with things that people just don't want to talk about or see," Price County Sheriff Brian Schmidt told local media.

Anonymous said...

So many small planes crashing!! What is happening??

Anonymous said...

NOAA shows a CB there at that time so...

Theodore Stacy said...

Flight data shows pilot diverting the flight path vector to go around a large convective pattern. Depending on the weights of passengers, fuel, and baggage, aircraft may have been near gross weight. Data shows about 2 minutes of disturbed flight.

Jim B said...


The PIC elected to continue to fly into a thunderstorm in the middle of the night (02:53L).

Those of us who have digital weather displays are strongly warned by the providers this data, while certainly useful is not real-time information and where the storms are located at the time of encounter will not be the same location as the aged data on the screen.

One cannot edge-fly storms with digital weather services.

(Ref. FAA - AC 00-24C - Thunderstorms)

Section 8, subsection (g)

Data Link of Ground Radar Information to the Cockpit. Unlike airborne weather avoidance radar, weather data linked from a ground weather surveillance radar system is not real-time information. The radar data displays recent rather than current weather conditions. As the current location of a thunderstorm cell may be different than the broadcast weather product, do not attempt to find a hole in a thunderstorm solely using data-linked weather. Pilots must avoid individual storms by visual sighting or by airborne weather radar.

Section 10 has the time-tested list of do's and don'ts of circumnavigating thunderstorms. Kathryn's Report is well stocked with in-flight breakups that could have been avoided.

Rest in peace my aeronautical friends.




Anonymous said...

TRW's will FYU ... badly!!