Sunday, May 14, 2017

Tecnam P2004 Bravo, N128LS: Accident occurred July 10, 2014 in Melbourne, Brevard County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N128LS

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA344
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 10, 2014 in Melbourne, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE TECNA P2004 BRAVO, registration: N128LS
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot departed on a cross-country flight in the light sport airplane. After leveling off at a cruise altitude about 2,500 ft, the pilot turned off the electric fuel pump and saw an initial decrease in fuel pressure followed by a return to the normal range. About 5-10 minutes later, the engine began to run rough, and the pilot turned on the electric fuel pump. The engine ran smoothly for a short time then experienced a total loss of power, and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a dirt road. 

A postaccident test run of the engine revealed no anomalies when the engine was operated at low rpm. The engine could not be run at full power due to the damage sustained to its mounts during the forced landing. Based on the available information, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power during cruise flight for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information. 

On July 10, 2014, about 0940 eastern daylight time, a Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecna P2004 Bravo, N128LS, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Melbourne, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed Orlando Apopka Airport (X04), Apopka, Florida, and was destined for Merritt Island Airport (COI), Merritt Island, Florida. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

The pilot stated that a preflight inspection and engine run-up check revealed no anomalies. The takeoff was normal, and he climbed the airplane to a cruise altitude of 2,500 feet. Upon establishing the airplane in cruise flight, the pilot turned off the electric fuel pump and observed the fuel pressure gauge indicate an initial decrease, followed by an increase to the normal range. About five to ten minutes later, the engine began to run rough, and the pilot turned on the electric fuel pump. The engine ran smoothly for a short time, then experienced a total loss of power. The pilot subsequently conducted a forced landing to a dirt road. 

The airplane was examined at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector. The inspector stated that the wing fuel tanks each contained about 3 gallons of fuel, and that the engine firewall had sustained substantial damage. The airplane was then moved to X04 to facilitate further examination. Electrical power was applied to the airplane, and the operation of the electric fuel pump was verified. Fuel was plumbed to the engine, and the engine started and ran smoothly at low rpm with no anomalies observed. The engine could not be run at full power due to damage sustained to the engine mounts during the forced landing. 

The 0953 weather observation at Melbourne International Airport (MLB), about 14 nautical miles southeast of the accident site, included clear skies, 10 miles visibility, wind from 190 degrees at 5 knots, temperature 28 degrees C, dew point 23 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in January 2012. His total flight experience, as well as flight experience in the accident airplane make and model, was not determined.

The airplane was manufactured in 2006, and was equipped with a Rotax 912ULS, 100hp, reciprocating engine. The airplane's maintenance history was not determined. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 1,451.4 total hours.

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