Thursday, May 25, 2017

de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter 300, N708PV, Skydive Perris: Accident occurred May 24, 2017 at Perris Valley Airport (L65), Riverside County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA303 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Perris, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 6, registration: N708PV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the twin-engine, turbine-powered airplane reported that, while providing flights for skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He added that, on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and “approximately 200’ [ft.] south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out. [He] believe[d] some kind of wind shear caused the aircraft [to] slam onto [the] runway and bounce into the air at a 45 to 60-degree bank angle to the right.” The prospective pilot then said, “you got it.” The pilot took control of the airplane and initiated a go-around by increasing power, which aggravated the “off runway heading.” The right wing contacted the ground, the airplane exited the runway to the right and impacted a fuel truck, and the right wing separated from the airplane. The impact caused the pilot to unintentionally add max power, and the airplane, with only the left engine functioning, ground looped to the right, coming to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system about 8 nautical miles from the accident site reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 280° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 20,000 ft agl, temperature 86°F, dew point 45°F, and altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury. The pilot landed on runway 15.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The prospective pilot’s improper landing flare and the pilot’s delayed remedial action to initiate a go-around, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Perris Valley Aviation

PM Leasing Inc
http://registry.faa.gov/N708PV

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA303
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Perris, CA
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC 6, registration: N708PV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the twin-engine, turbine powered airplane reported that while providing flights for skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He added that on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and "approximately 200' [ft.] south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out. [He] believe[d] some kind of wind shear caused the aircraft [to] slam onto [the] runway and bounce into the air at a 45 to 60-degree bank angle to the right." The new pilot then said, "you got it". The pilot took the control and initiated a go around by increasing power which aggravated the "off runway heading". The right wing contacted the ground, the airplane exited the runway to the right, impacted a fuel truck and the right-wing separated from the airplane. The impact caused the pilot to unintentionally add max power and the airplane, with only the left engine functioning ground looped to the right, coming to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system about 8 nautical miles from the accident site, about the time of the accident, reported the wind from 280° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 20,000 ft. AGL, temperature 86°F, dew point 45°F, and altimeter 29.81 in Hg. The pilot landed on runway 15.





PERRIS — Cal Fire/Riverside County Fire Cpt. and Public Information Officer Lucas Felman provided additional information about a plane crash that happened earlier today, May 24. The crash happened at the Perris Valley Airport on the 2000 block of Goetz Road in Perris.

“As the plane was landing it came in contact with a fuel truck,” Felman explained from the scene. “As it did, it ripped off half of the wing and then spun itself around.”


After smashing into the fuel tanker and spinning, the plane came to rest a mere 100 yards from a large building. “If it (had gone) any further it would have collided into that building, potentially injuring many people,” said Felman.


Although the fuel tanker was damaged, no fuel was spilled from it or the airplane, according to the fire captain, who said FAA investigators had already arrived at the scene and assumed the investigation into the cause of the minor-injury accident.


PERRIS — One person was slightly injured and another walked away unharmed after a plane crashed this afternoon at the Perris Valley Airport. The crash, that ripped one wing completely off the heavily damaged plane, happened Wednesday, May 24. The regional airport is located on the 2000 block of Goetz Road in Perris.


The small, privately owned and operated airport is open to public use and is best known for Skydive Perris, which operates out of the location. The company has a grass parachute landing zone about 50 feet from the airport’s single runway.


Cal Fire/Riverside County firefighters and Riverside County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to the airport at 3:55 p.m., after Riverside County emergency dispatchers received reports of an aircraft down at the location.


Twelve firefighters from two engine companies responded to the air emergency, Cal Fire/Riverside County Fire Public Information Officer Tawny Cabral said in an incident report. They were assisted by the Riverside County Fire Department’s Hazardous Materials Team and Hazardous Materials Support Unit as well as the Riverside County Environmental Health Department.


“The first arriving engine company advised one passenger aircraft was down,” said Cabral. Two occupants were in the plane when it crashed and had already exited the plane by the time officials began arriving.


Firefighter/paramedics evaluated and treated one injured victim at the scene, whose injuries were described as minor. Both occupants from the plane declined further medical treatment.


After the crash, the heavily damaged plane could be seen sitting on the runway, with law enforcement, fire and other officials surveying the wreckage.


The plane, a 1976 de Havilland “Twin Otter” DHC-6 was missing most of its right wing and had sustained other substantial damage; including to the landing gear, nose, tail section and left wing.


FAA records indicate the twin-engine, turbo-prop is owned by PM Leasing Inc., which shares an address with Skydive Perris. It was not immediately known who the plane was leased to; however, Skydive Perris was clearly marked on the plane’s fuselage.


FAA and NTSB officials are reportedly headed to the scene of the crash to conduct an investigation into the cause.


The last plane known to have crashed at the airport happened during the 40th anniversary celebration of Skydive Perris Saturday Sept. 3.


In that incident, a Vintage WWII warplane ended up nose down in the dirt after suffering what officials at the time called a “hard landing.” The pilot in that crash walked away uninjured.


Story and photo gallery: http://myvalleynews.com


A passenger aircraft was damaged after hitting a parked vehicle at Perris Valley Airport at 3:55 p.m. Wednesday, May 24, but no one was transported for treatment of any injuries, according to a Cal Fire/Riverside County Fire Department news release.

The plane is a DeHavilland DHC-6-300 Twin Otter, according to the Federal Aviation Administration aircraft registry using the aircraft’s tail number provided by an agency spokesman.

The fixed-wing, multi-engine turbo-prop plane is registered to PM Leasing Inc. at the same Goetz Road address used by Skydive Perris at the airport. A message left at the skydive business seeking comment was not returned. A photograph of the damaged plane shows the words “Skydive Perris” painted above a door.

The airport is in the 2000 block of Goetz Road and is a popular launch base for skydivers.The plane had two occupants on board, one with no injuries and one who was examined but refused treatment after being evaluated by paramedics, according to the written statement.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, which FAA spokesman Ian Gregor described in an email as a crash under unknown circumstances.

Photos showed an airplane with part of a wing missing, and parked on a hard surface near some industrial-type buildings.

Skydive Perris’ website describes its fleet of aircraft as including a DeHavilland DHC6 Twin Otter. “The Twin Otter is a world renown turbine engine powered airplane that is used in many roles. The factory didn’t know it at the time but they really designed it for skydiving,” according to the website description.

The website notes that the Perris business was the first in the industry to operate a Twin Otter beginning in 1981, and has three in the fleet configured for 22 jumpers.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.pe.com

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