Monday, April 10, 2017

Cessna 172F, N8350U (and) Piper J3C-65, N88470: Accident occurred April 08, 2017 at Andy Barnhart Memorial Airport (3OH0), New Carlisle, Clark County, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA223A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in New Carlisle, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: PIPER J3C, registration: N88470
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA223B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in New Carlisle, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8350U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped Piper reported that his airplane was not equipped with a radio and that the forward visibility was not good when taxiing while piloting the airplane from the rear seat. He entered a left downwind for the runway, saw no other aircraft while on final, and continued to land. He added that, during the landing roll, as he turned to clear the runway, his airplane collided with a Cessna airplane that was taxiing on the same runway after having landed on it from the opposite direction. He reported that he did not see the Cessna before the collision.

The Piper sustained substantial damage to the right wing’s front spar.

The pilot of the Cessna reported that, while flying local in the traffic pattern, he announced his position and intent to land on the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency during all landings while simultaneously visually checking right and left for traffic. He added that, as he was taxiing on the runway toward the exit after landing, he saw the Piper land in the opposite direction on the same runway. Subsequently, the Piper turned diagonally across the runway toward the Cessna, and the two airplanes collided. 

The Cessna sustained substantial damage to its right wing.

Both pilots reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with either airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s decision to land on an occupied runway and his failure to see and avoid the other airplane.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped Piper, reported that his airplane was not equipped with a radio, and that the forward visibility is not good when taxiing, while piloting the airplane from the rear seat. He entered a left downwind for the runway, saw no other aircraft while on final, and continued to land. He added that during the landing roll, as he turned to clear the runway, his airplane collided with a Cessna airplane that was taxiing on the runway after having landed on the same runway, from the opposite direction. He reported that he did not see the Cessna prior to the collision.

The Piper sustained substantial damage to the right wing's front spar.

The pilot of the Cessna reported that while flying local in the traffic pattern he announced his position and intent to land on the airport's Common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) during all landings, while at the same time visually checking right and left for traffic. He added that as he was taxiing on the runway toward the exit after landing, he saw the Piper land in the opposite direction on the same runway. Subsequently, the Piper turned diagonally across the runway toward the Cessna, and the two airplanes collided. 

The Cessna sustained substantial damage to its right wing.

Both pilots reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with either airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N88470

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA223A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in New Carlisle, OH
Aircraft: PIPER J3C, registration: N88470
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped Piper, reported that his airplane was not equipped with a radio, and that the forward visibility is not good when taxiing, while piloting the airplane from the rear seat. He entered a left downwind for the runway, saw no other aircraft while on final, and continued to land. He added that during the landing roll, as he turned to clear the runway, his airplane collided with a Cessna airplane that was taxiing on the runway after having landed on the same runway, from the opposite direction. He reported that he did not see the Cessna prior to the collision.

The Piper sustained substantial damage to the right wing's front spar.

The pilot of the Cessna reported that while flying local in the traffic pattern he announced his position and intent to land on the airport's Common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) during all landings, while at the same time visually checking right and left for traffic. He added that as he was taxiing on the runway toward the exit after landing, he saw the Piper land in the opposite direction on the same runway. Subsequently, the Piper turned diagonally across the runway toward the Cessna, and the two airplanes collided. 

The Cessna sustained substantial damage to its right wing.

Both pilots reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with either airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms   

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA223B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in New Carlisle, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8350U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped Piper, reported that his airplane was not equipped with a radio, and that the forward visibility is not good when taxiing, while piloting the airplane from the rear seat. He entered a left downwind for the runway, saw no other aircraft while on final, and continued to land. He added that during the landing roll, as he turned to clear the runway, his airplane collided with a Cessna airplane that was taxiing on the runway after having landed on the same runway, from the opposite direction. He reported that he did not see the Cessna prior to the collision.

The Piper sustained substantial damage to the right wing's front spar.

The pilot of the Cessna reported that while flying local in the traffic pattern he announced his position and intent to land on the airport's Common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) during all landings, while at the same time visually checking right and left for traffic. He added that as he was taxiing on the runway toward the exit after landing, he saw the Piper land in the opposite direction on the same runway. Subsequently, the Piper turned diagonally across the runway toward the Cessna, and the two airplanes collided. 

The Cessna sustained substantial damage to its right wing.


Both pilots reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with either airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

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