Saturday, March 4, 2017

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, N421KL: Fatal accident occurred March 04, 2017 at Cherokee County Airport (KCNI), Ball Ground, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N421KL 

Location: Canton, GA
Accident Number: ERA17FA118
Date & Time: 03/04/2017, 0023 EST
Registration: N421KL
Aircraft: CESSNA 421
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 4, 2017, about 0023 eastern standard time, a Cessna 421B, N421KL, was substantially damaged during an attempted go-around and subsequent collision with terrain at Cherokee County Airport (CNI), Canton, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and was being operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight. The flight originated about 1930 on March 3, 2017, from Richard Lloyd Jones Jr Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma, and was destined for CNI.

According to personnel at an aviation brokerage company in Oklahoma, the pilot purchased the airplane on March 2, 2017. A flight instructor reported that he and the pilot flew the airplane on March 1, 2017, for 1.5 hours to go over the various systems of the Cessna 421B. On March 2, 2017, the flight instructor flew with the pilot again for 45 minutes conducting pattern work. The flight instructor said that the pilot told him that he had previously owned two Cessna 421Cs, was a little "rusty," and had not flown that type of airplane since 1984. The instructor reported that, overall, the pilot was knowledgeable of the operation of airplane. He also reported that the pilot departed with enough fuel for the cross-country flight. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that the flight instructor signed off a flight review on March 3, 2017.

Radar and audio data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot was in contact with air traffic control and receiving visual flight rules (VFR) flight following services while inbound to CNI. The pilot cancelled flight following when he had the airport in sight. Radar data continued to show the airplane on approach to CNI until 2,500 ft when the airplane descended below radar coverage.

A review of airport video surveillance footage revealed that the runway lights were illuminated during the airplane's approach to runway 05. The airplane's landing lights became visible as the airplane neared the runway. On short final, the airplane pitched up and rolled to the right. The airplane then descended in a nose-down attitude into a ravine on the right side of the runway. The video footage stopped for a second, and then a fire was seen in the ravine.
Witnesses observed the airplane flying extremely low before noticing a "ball of fire" erupt near the airport.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 69-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. On his most recent FAA second-class medical certificate application, dated April 13, 2016, he reported a total flight experience of 4,000 hours with no hours flown during the last 6 months. The medical certificate indicated a limitation for glasses for near vision. A review of the pilot's current logbook, which was labeled logbook No. 3, revealed a total of 11.9 hours of flight experience since January 16, 2017.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The multi-engine airplane was manufactured in 1970, and it was powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-series engines driving Hartzell PHC-C3YD-2UF controllable-pitch propellers. The most recent annual inspection was completed on March 1, 2017, at a recording hour meter time of 2,048.4 hours. The right engine was a GTSIO-520-D21CH engine, serial number 219483-R; it had a total time of 2,048.4 hours and a time since overhaul of 38.2 hours at the last inspection. The left engine was a GTSIO-520-H engine, serial number 218284-R; it had a total time of 2,048.4 hours and a time since overhaul of 430.9 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0010, the recorded weather at CNI included calm wind, 10 miles visibility, and clear skies. The temperature was 5°C; the dew point was -15°C; and the altimeter setting was 30.54 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane contacted a wire about 380 ft to the right of the runway and parallel the runway. The airplane came to rest in a retention pond about 420 ft on the right of the runway centerline and runway threshold. The nose of the airplane was crushed aft, and the wind screen on the left side was broken away from the fuselage. Examination of the cockpit revealed that the instrument panel was crushed toward the left side of the fuselage. The flap control was in the fully extended position. The left engine throttle control was full forward, and the right engine throttle control was at the halfway mark. The left mixture control was full rich, and the right mixture control was at the halfway mark. The left propeller control was at the halfway mark, and the right propeller control was full forward. The left fuel selector handle was in the left main tank position, and the right fuel selector handle was in the right main tank position. Examination of the flight controls revealed continuity from the cockpit to all the flight control surfaces.

The left wing from the engine nacelle outboard exhibited postimpact fire damage. Fire damage exposed the main fuel tank attachment and baffle, which were intact. The left engine nacelle also showed signs of fire damage. The wing flaps were observed in the extended position.

Examination of the right wing revealed that it remained intact with very little postimpact fire damage, which was confined to the area around the engine nacelle. Fuel was observed in the right main fuel tank, the right-wing auxiliary tank, and the right nacelle locker tank; about 25 gallons of fuel were drained from the tanks. The right main fuel tank exhibited striations and flattening to the upper surface of the tank, which were consistent with a contact with a wire. Leading edge damage to the right wing was observed, which was consistent with contact with a wire. A power wire was observed wrapped around the right main landing gear. The wing flaps were observed in the extended position. Examination of the empennage revealed that the vertical stabilizer, horizontal stabilizer, rudder, and elevators remained attached. Both horizontal stabilizers were buckled.

All three landing gear were broken away from the airplane at the struts. The landing gear trunnions were observed in the down positions. The landing gear handle in the cockpit was observed in the down position.

Examination of the left engine revealed that it remained partially attached to the airframe by two engine mounts, hoses, wires, and cables. The engine displayed impact damage as well as some thermal damage to the rear of the engine. The crankcase remained intact and displayed impact damage. All the cylinders remained attached to their cylinder bays and displayed varying amounts of impact damage. The internal portions of the cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope. The piston faces, valve heads, and cylinder bores did not display any anomalies. The crankshaft was rotated, and all six cylinders had thumb compression and suction. The overhead components (valves, springs, and rocker arms) were examined and did not display any anomalies. The external components of the engine (fuel pump, throttle, metering unit, and both magnetos) remained attached and displayed thermal damage. The ignition harness remained attached to both magnetos and displayed impact damage to the No. 2 and the No. 6 bottom ignition leads. All the spark plugs remained secured in their cylinders. The spark plugs were removed, and it was noted that all the electrodes displayed normal operating signatures when compared to Champion Aviation Service Manual AV6-R. The magnetos were removed, and both magneto drive shafts were rotated using an electric drill. The spark plugs were installed onto the ignition harness, and it was noted that all the spark plugs sparked between the ground and center electrodes.

The left turbocharger remained attached to the airframe and displayed minor impact damage. The wastegate remained attached to its installation point and was undamaged. The compressor and the turbine were undamaged and did not display any anomalies. The exhaust system displayed impact damage, and no signs of exhaust leaks were noted.

Examination of the right engine revealed that it remained partially attached to the airframe and displayed impact and thermal damage. All six cylinders remained attached to their cylinder bays and displayed varying amounts of impact damage. The internal portions of the cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope; the cylinder bores, piston faces, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. The crankshaft was rotated, and all six cylinders had good thumb compression and suction. The overhead components (valves, springs, and rocker arms) were examined and did not display any anomalies. The external components of the engine (fuel pump, throttle, metering unit, and both magnetos) remained attached and displayed impact and thermal damage. The ignition harness displayed impact damage signatures to the No. 6 bottom ignition lead, which was partially severed. The magnetos were removed, and both magneto drive shafts were rotated using an electric drill. The magnetos produced spark on all six posts individually. The spark plugs were removed and visually inspected. All the spark plugs displayed normal operating and wear signatures when compared to Champion Aviation Service Manual AV6-R. The spark plugs were installed onto the ignition harness, and it was noted that all the spark plugs sparked between the ground and center electrodes.

The right turbocharger remained attached to the airframe and displayed minor impact damage. The wastegate remained attached to its installation point and was undamaged. The compressor and the turbine were undamaged and did not display any anomalies. Rotation and continuity were established between the two sections of the turbine and compressor. There were no signs of induction leaks noted. The exhaust system displayed impact damage throughout the exhaust system. There were no signs of exhaust leaks noted.

An examination of the propellers revealed that the blades on both propellers exhibited chordwise/rotational scoring on the camber sides, leading edge gouging, bending aft, and twisting leading edge down. One blade on each propeller had a fractured tip. Two blades on each propeller had fractured pitch change knobs with damage indicating the blades were forcibly rotated towards low pitch. The preload plate impact marks on both propellers were similar, indicating operation at or near the low pitch stop angle. There were no discrepancies noted that would have prevented or degraded normal propeller operation before impact. All damage to the propellers was consistent with high impact forces.

A JPI FS-450 fuel monitoring device was recovered from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for data download. Upon arrival in the lab, an internal examination revealed thermal damage. The device was reassembled, and power was applied; however, the device would not power on, and no data was obtained from the device.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Division of Forensics Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Decatur, Georgia, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was noted as multiple blunt force trauma.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. Atorvastatin was identified in liver and cavity blood. Clonazepam and its metabolite 7-aminoclonazepam, hydrocodone and its active metabolite dihydrocodeine, diphenhydramine, nortriptyline, and temazepam were identified in liver. In addition, 0.031 ug/ml of 7-aminoclonazepam, 0.016 ug/ml of hydrocodone, an unquantified amount of dihydrocodeine, 0.129 ug/ml of diphenhydramine, an unquantified amount of nortriptyline, and 0.068 ug/ml of temazepam were identified in cavity blood. The toxicology testing identified the pilot had evidence of having used 5 different impairing medications.

Clonazepam is a sedating benzodiazepine often called Klonopin that is used to treat panic disorder and certain kinds of epilepsy. It is available by prescription as a Schedule IV substance. It impairs cognitive and physical performance and carries this warning, "Since clonazepam produces central nervous system (CNS) depression, patients receiving this drug should be cautioned against engaging in hazardous occupations requiring mental alertness, such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle. They should also be warned about the concomitant use of alcohol or other CNS- depressant drugs during clonazepam therapy.
Hydrocodone is an opioid pain medication available by prescription as a Schedule II controlled substance. Commonly available in combination with acetaminophen (commonly called Tylenol), tablets may also carry names such as Norco, Lorcet, and Vicodin. Hydrocodone "exposes users to the risks of addiction, abuse, and misuse" and "profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death may result from the concomitant use of hydrocodone … with benzodiazepines or other CNS depressants (e.g., non-benzodiazepine sedatives/hypnotics, anxiolytics, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, general anesthetics, antipsychotics, other opioids, alcohol)." The range of blood levels where hydrocodone is considered to have psychoactive effects is between 0.01 and 0.05 ug/ml.

Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under the names Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following warning: may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery). Compared to other antihistamines, diphenhydramine causes marked sedation; it is also classed as a CNS depressant and this is the rationale for its use as a sleep aid. Altered mood and impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance may also be observed. In fact, in a driving simulator study, a single dose of diphenhydramine impaired driving ability more than a blood alcohol concentration of 0.100%. The therapeutic range of diphenhydramine is 0.0250 to 0.1120 ug/ml. Diphenhydramine is widely distributed throughout the body and brain after an oral dose. Typical blood levels within 2-3 hours after oral ingestion of 50-100 mg are about 0.100 ug/ml. However, diphenhydramine undergoes post mortem redistribution where after death, the drug can leech from storage sites back into blood. Central post mortem levels may be about two to three times her than peripheral levels.

Nortriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant, often marketed with the name Pamelor. It carries this warning about performance: "may impair the mental and/or physical abilities required for the performance of hazardous tasks, such as operating machinery or driving a car."

Temazepam is a sedating benzodiazepine medication available by prescription as a Schedule IV controlled substance and often marketed with the name Restoril. It is indicated for the short-term treatment of insomnia (generally 7 to 10 days). It carries a black box warning (the strongest level) regarding prescribing in combination with opioids: "Concomitant use of benzodiazepines and opioids may result in profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death." In addition, there is this precaution, "If temazepam is to be combined with other drugs having known hypnotic properties or CNS-depressant effects, consideration should be given to potential additive effects." Finally, there are warnings about the potential for bizarre behaviors and "there have been reports of people getting out of bed after taking a sedative-hypnotic and driving their cars while not fully awake, often with no memory of the event. If a patient experiences such an episode, it should be reported to his or her doctor immediately, since "sleep-driving" can be dangerous. This behavior is more likely to occur when temazepam is taken with alcohol or other central nervous system depressants." The range of blood levels where temazepam is considered to have psychoactive effects is between 0.017 and 0.132 ug/ml. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/13/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/03/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 11.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11.9 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N421KL
Model/Series: 421 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 421B0015
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 30 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7522.4 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: GTSIO-520-D21
Registered Owner: ROGERS MICHAEL W
Rated Power: 340 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: CNI, 1219 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0510 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.54 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tulsa, OK (RVS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Canton, GA (CNI)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 2030 CST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Cherokee County Airport (CNI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1219 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal

Latitude, Longitude:  34.546667, -84.800000

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA118
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 04, 2017 in Canton, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA 421, registration: N421KL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 4, 2017 about 0023 eastern standard time, a Cessna 421B, N421KL, was substantially damaged after a collision with a powerline and terrain in Canton, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Night visual night meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. The flight departed from the Richard Lloyd Jones Jr Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma at 1930 eastern standard time.

According to personnel at Southwest Aviation & Brokerage, the pilot purchased the airplane on March 2, 2017. A flight instructor who flew with the pilot on March 1, 2017, said he flew for a 1 1/2 hours to go over the various systems of the Cessna 421. On March 2, 2017, the flight instructor flew with the pilot again for 45 minutes conducting pattern work. He said that the pilot told him that he had owned two Cessna 421Cs in past and was a little "rusty." The pilot went on to say that he hasn't flown a 421 since 1984. The instructor acknowledged that overall the pilot was knowledgeable of the operation of airplane. The flight instructor also recalled that the pilot departed with sufficient fuel for the cross-country flight.

Preliminary radar data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that the pilot was in contact with air traffic control and was receiving VFR flight following services while inbound to Cherokee County Airport (CNI), Canton, Georgia, and cancelled flight following when he had the airport in sight. Witnesses observed the airplane flying extremely low, before noticing a "ball of fire" erupt near the airport.

According to the airport manager, video footage of the airplane approaching runway 5 was captured by the airport surveillance system. She went on to say that the video showed that as the airplane got closer to the airport, it banked to the right side of the runway before descending into a ravine.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest in a retention pond located about 420 feet east of the runway centerline. There were powerlines entangled on the right main landing gear strut and right wing of the airplane. The nose and cockpit were crushed aft and the windscreen on the left side was broken away from the fuselage. Examination of the cockpit revealed that the instrument panel was crushed towards the left side of the fuselage. The left wing exhibited post-crash fire and crush damage on the engine nacelle and outboard towards the wing tip tank. Examination of the right wing revealed post impact fire damage around the engine nacelle. Fuel was observed in the right main tank, the right-wing auxiliary wing tank, and the right nacelle locker tank. Examination of the empennage revealed that the vertical stabilizer was attached and the rudder remained attached. The horizontal stabilizers were still attached to the empennage and the elevators remained attached. Both horizontal stabilizers were buckled. Examination of the flight controls revealed continuity from the cockpit to all the flight control surfaces. The wreckage was retained for reexamination at a later date.








CHEROKEE COUNTY, Ga. - A pilot is dead after an overnight plane crash in Cherokee County.

The plane went down just short of the Cherokee County Regional Airport.

No one else was on board the plane.

The pilot who died in the crash was identified as Steven Silver, 69, of Woodstock.

Friends said he was a family man and a Vietnam veteran who loved to fly. 

"He liked flying a lot, from conversations I had with him, and I know that he liked to fly himself versus flying commercial," neighbor Dave Greenstein said. 

Neighbors told Channel 2's Matt Johnson that Silver was on his way back from a business trip in Oklahoma. 

The plane was registered to a man out of Oklahoma, but it expired last month.

Investigators were at the scene near Airport Drive into Saturday afternoon.

Channel 2's Steve Gehlbach talked to them as they gathered evidence at the crash site.  

He learned firefighters could not get to the plane at first.

The plane snapped a power pole in half when it crashed.

There were live wires across the road and the crash site, down the hill.

Crews removed the wreckage Saturday afternoon. 

Federal investigators are working to determine what caused the crash. 

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.wsbtv.com
























CHEROKEE COUNTY, GA (CBS46) -  A pilot is dead after his plane crash landed into a retention pond in Cherokee County early Saturday morning.

The crash happened just after midnight at the Cherokee County Airport near Ball Ground.


The Cessna 421B Golden Eagle brought down power lines before crashing into a retention pond near the runway. About 50 Georgia Power customers are offline as a result. The company expects service to be restored to the area by 2 p.m.


The pilot, identified as 69 year-old Steven Silver of Woodstock, was killed in the crash. 


According to the FAA registry, the plane was registered to Michael Rogers of Coweta, Oklahoma.


The NTSB and FAA will be on the scene on Saturday to further investigate the cause of the crash.


Source: http://www.cbs46.com









CHEROKEE COUNTY, Ga. - A pilot is dead after an overnight plane crash in Cherokee County.

The plane went down just short of the airport in the area.

No one else was on board the plane.

The pilot who died in the crash was identified as Steven Silver, 69, of Woodstock. 

Investigators were at the scene near Airport Drive into Saturday afternoon.

Channel 2's Steve Gehlbach talked to them as they gathered evidence at the crash site.  

He learned firefighters could not get to the plane at first.

The plane snapped a power pole in half when it crashed.

There were live wires across the road and the crash site, down the hill

Georgia power crews were working to clear the area Saturday morning. 

Federal investigators were there briefly and will return this morning once the sun is up to get a better look at the scene.

Source:  http://www.wsbtv.com




BALL GROUND, Ga -- The pilot who died at the controls after a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle crashed late Friday night has been identified.

Steven Silver, 69, of Woodstock, died after the plane crashed near the Cherokee County airport.

Police and fire crews responded to the crash around 12 a.m. where they found a plane down at the end of the runway at the Cherokee County Airport near the 1300 block of Bishop Road.

The airplane apparently clipped a power line and crashed into a nearby retention pond. Officials confirmed the death upon examining the scene.

11Alive reporters on the ground said the tail number of the aircraft is N421KL. According to FAA records, the aircraft is registered to an owner in Coweta, OK.

The Federal Aviation Administration is continuing its investigation.

Source:  http://www.11alive.com





CHEROKEE COUNTY, Ga. - A tragic plane crash in Cherokee County has left a pilot dead, according to the Cherokee Sheriff's Office.

Deputies say 69-year-old Steven Silver, of Woodstock, was killed when his plane crashed near the Cherokee County Airport, located at 1350 Bishop Road in Ball Ground.

Police tell FOX 5 the plane hit a power line and took out power in the area.

The National Transportation Safety Board is expected to take over the investigation to determine what caused the crash.









BALL GROUND, GA -- A Woodstock man died in a plane crash overnight Saturday at the Cherokee County Regional Airport.

The collision took place shortly after midnight March 4 near the end of the runway and brought down power lines, said Cherokee Sheriff's Office spokesperson Lt. Jay Baker.

The Cessna 421B Golden Eagle crashed into a retention pond just east of the runway. The plane caught fire upon impact, but was quickly doused by Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services firefighters who also responded to the scene.

The pilot, identified as 69-year-old Steven Silver of Woodstock, was the sole occupant of the plane.  Silver appeared to have been trying to land the plane when it crashed. Officials from the FAA and the NTSB will assess the scene Saturday.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Found a Michael W. Rogers of Coweta, OK on the FAA Airman website. Could it be the same guy? No Multi..last medical 2006. Same address as is listed for the owner of the aircraft.

Date of Issue: 4/28/2008
Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT
Ratings:
PRIVATE PILOT
ROTORCRAFT-HELICOPTER

Limits:
ENGLISH PROFICIENT.

Anonymous said...

Pilot = Steven Silver. A 69 year-old, flying late at night, early morning .... I wonder what he was up to.

Anonymous said...

He had just purchased the airplane as was flying it home.

Anonymous said...

Michael Rogers was the previous owner. It was just purchased.

BE35 said...

Silver's FAA Pilot record indicates Private Pilot, no multi rating or other certification

BE35 said...

FAA records for Mr. Silver is Private Pilot, no multi or other certification. He may have recently received a multi rating. We'll learn. If so, wondering time in type?

Anonymous said...

Mr. Silver was a Vietnam veteran. Enough said about his aviator skills.

Thank you, thank you, for your service, sir.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Silver has had a multi engine rating in the past.

Anonymous said...

Do not push those prop levers forward on landing - A 421 WILL FALL OUT OF THE SKY!

ATP, CFI, 39 Years as a pilot - Too many hrs. In C-421's.

Anonymous said...

The Cheroke County Airport shows uncontrolled and unmanned after 1800. It has pilot controlled runway and approach lights. There is no record that I have seen of weather conditions at the time of the accident. Judging from the pole damage and road signs, it appears the aircraft was lined up about 1,000 feet left of the runway. Impact and final position would indicate that the altitude was about right but power poles got in the way. I am a vet and no one gets a free pass to do this. He didn’t take anyone with him or on the ground but that is always just the luck of that draw. Correct me on any of this.

Anonymous said...

I'm local to this airport. Live about 7miles south of it. I keep my plane at PDK as I have partners in my plane.

Based on the position of the plane and the clipped power lines... It seems he was roughly lined up for runway 05, but as someone said above, he was about 1000ft to the left (nw) of the runway. I checked weather and weather seemed to not have been a factor.
https://www.wunderground.com/history/airport/KCNI/2017/3/4/DailyHistory.html?req_city=&req_state=&req_statename=&reqdb.zip=&reqdb.magic=&reqdb.wmo=&MR=1

There is an NDB and an RNAV for runway 05.

Runway lights are good as there is not much surrounding light noise. Winds can be challenging at this airport as it's basically on the top of a hill and the wind is almost always a direct cross wind. But seems winds were overall calm that evening.

hard to say what actually happened

Anonymous said...

Do not push those prop levers forward on landing - A 421 WILL FALL OUT OF THE SKY!

What in the hell are you even talking about? That's absolutely false.

Craig Cardell said...

Just to clarify a few things. The pilot did have a multi-engine rating and was a current pilot with over 4000 hours. He purchased the aircraft and received training prior to flying the aircraft to Canton. However, this was his first flight alone in the aircraft. Also, airport cameras show the aircraft making an approach then abruptly rolling (nearly 90 deg) to the right shortly before the runway. No one has discovered why this happened yet and the investigation is still active.