Sunday, July 17, 2016

Cessna A188 Agwagon 300, N3547Q: Fatal accident occurred September 16, 2016 in Alapaha, Berrien County, Georgia

Jason E. Watson

James Watson said his brother died doing something he loved: crop dusting. Growing up on a farm, James said Jason dreamed of having his own crop dusting business, but most importantly, working on his family farm.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3547Q


Location: Alapaha, GA
Accident Number: ERA16FA316
Date & Time: 09/16/2016, 0915 EDT
Registration: N3547Q
Aircraft: CESSNA A188
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On September 16, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A188, N3547Q, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Alapaha, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight, which originated from Berrien County Airport (4J2), Nashville, Georgia, about 0855.

According to a ground assistant who routinely supported the pilot during agricultural operations, the pilot planned to complete a total of three aerial application flights on the day of the accident. He reported that the pilot departed on the first flight of the day at 0715 and returned about 1 hour 15 minutes later. The assistant reported that the pilot stated, "everything seems good," and they began preparations for the second flight.

The assistant loaded about 150 to 160 gallons of chemical and water mix into the airplane's hopper, and the pilot "topped off" the single fuel tank from his personal trailer-based fuel tank. The assistant reported that the pilot intended to spray a 13-acre cotton field, which was about 14 miles north of the departure airport, a flight time of 8 to 9 minutes. He further reported that the pilot also intended to spray a 100-acre field during the flight, and that the pilot liked to spray the "larger fields first, to lighten his load" before spraying smaller fields. He added that he observed the pilot put on his shoulder harness and flight helmet and depart at 0855.

Two witnesses, located about 1/4 to 1/2 mile from the 13-acre cotton field, heard an airplane "flying back and forth" about 0915. Subsequently, the engine noise went silent, and then they heard an impact. One witness stated that the sound of impact was "5 to 10 seconds" after the engine noise went silent. Neither witness saw the airplane flying.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/28/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/23/2015
Flight Time:  449.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 125.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 410.2 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued in June 2016 with no limitations. The pilot did not report his flight time on his most recent medical certificate application.

Review of the pilot's logbook revealed entries between June 5, 2013, and June 26, 2016, which indicated a total flight experience of 450 hours of which 410 hours were as pilot in command and 125 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. According to the pilot's ground assistant, the pilot had performed multiple aerial application flights in the accident airplane in the 2-week period preceding the accident, which were not recorded in the logbook. The logbook showed that the pilot's most recent flight review was on February 23, 2015.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N3547Q
Model/Series: A188 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 188-0497
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/03/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2741.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-520D-9A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: 2JWG 

According to FAA airworthiness records, the single-seat, low-wing, fixed-landing-gear airplane was manufactured in 1969 and was registered to the pilot in June 2013. It was equipped with a 300-horsepower Continental Motors IO-520-D (9A) engine and a two-blade McCauley controllable-pitch propeller.

According to airframe and engine logbooks, the most recent annual and 100-hour inspections were completed in May 2016 at a recorded tachometer time of 2,741.9 hours and 642.1 hours since engine major overhaul. Review of the logbooks indicated that between April 2013 and May 2016 a total of 23 hours were accumulated on the tachometer.

Weight and Balance

The airplane flight manual (AFM) stated that the airplane's maximum gross weight for takeoff in the restricted category was 4,000 lbs, which was 700 lbs above the normal category maximum gross weight (3,300 lbs). According to maintenance records, in June 2014, the airplane was moved from the normal category to the restricted category.

A weight calculation was completed based upon the pilot's last reported weight on his medical certificate (176 lbs), full fuel (37 gallons), the reported chemical and water mix load (155 gallons), and an estimated empty weight for the airplane of 1,910 lbs. (The airplane's actual empty weight was not found.) The calculation revealed that the airplane's takeoff weight was about 3,601 lbs, which was within the restricted category limit.

Airplane Fuel System

According to the AFM, fuel from the standard fuselage fuel tank system was supplied to the engine from a 37-gallon aluminum tank located just aft of the engine compartment firewall. Fuel flowed from the tank to a shutoff valve beneath the tank. When the shutoff valve was open and the mixture control was in the rich position with the engine running, fuel was drawn through a check valve in the auxiliary fuel pump and through the fuel strainer to the engine-driven fuel pump, where it was pumped into the fuel metering unit. In the metering unit, fuel was regulated by setting the throttle and mixture controls. The metered fuel was then pumped through the fuel distribution valve to the injection nozzles. The remainder of the unmetered fuel was returned to the engine-driven fuel pump where excess fuel and vapor were directed through a return line to the top of the fuel tank.

Restricted Category Flight Characteristics

The AFM stated, in part: "Although the airplane is capable of working at speeds from 85 MPH [miles per hour] to 120 MPH, it is suggested that a speed of 95 MPH to 115 MPH be used for very heavy loads. The use of very low airspeeds in combination with heavy loads is not recommended because it reduces the margin of safety."

The AFM further stated, in part: "The stall characteristics are conventional, and aural warning is provided by a stall warning horn which sounds between 5 and 10 MPH above the stall in all configurations. The stall is also preceded by a mild aerodynamic buffet which increases in intensity as the stall is approached. All controls remain effective throughout the stall." The AFM also stated that, "Intentional spins are prohibited in this airplane. Should an inadvertent spin occur, standard light plane recovery techniques should be used." 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TMA, 354 ft msl
Observation Time: 0915 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 265°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 23°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: NASHVILLE, GA (4J2)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: NASHVILLE, GA (4J2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0855 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

The weather conditions reported at Henry Tift Myers Airport (TMA), Tifton, Georgia, at 0915, located about 16 miles west of the accident site, included wind 060° at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky condition clear, temperature 24°C, and dew point 23°C. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 31.434167, -83.173889 (est) 

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest upright in an open plowed dirt field, which bordered the cotton field being sprayed, on a heading of about 115° to 120° magnetic. The wreckage path led from broken tree branches (initial impact point) to the main wreckage and was about 100 ft long on a 300° magnetic heading. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene.

The fuselage exhibited impact and fire damage; however, there was no evidence of fire in flight. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The right wing was found twisted forward of its normal position; the fuselage was canted to the right just forward of the firewall; and the empennage displayed metal tearing to the right. The separated empennage control surfaces were found under the rear fuselage. The fixed main landing gear assemblies were separated and found in the debris field. Both flaps were found in an extended position. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the flight control surfaces to the burned outer section of the cockpit.

Examination of the cockpit revealed that the throttle control lever was about 1/3 forward from idle. The propeller control lever was found in the full forward position (high rpm). The mixture control was found pulled aft about 1 inch. The fuel shutoff valve was found in the "ON" position. The flap handle was found in a near vertical position past the flaps 20° extended position. The pilot's four-point lever-lock-style buckle was found latched with the shoulder harness buckle ends engaged in the lever lock. The instrument panel was consumed by fire. An agricultural GPS spray guidance system was found mounted in the cockpit; the device sustained fire and impact damage, and no data were recovered. 

The engine remained attached to the engine mount, firewall, and control cables and was thermally damaged. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression and suction were observed on all cylinders when the propeller flange was rotated. All spark plugs were examined with no anomalies observed. Each magneto was removed and rotated manually; spark was observed at each individual ignition lead. The engine-driven fuel pump drive coupling was intact, and no anomalies were found when the pump was examined. The oil filter screen was removed from the oil pump housing, and no contaminants were found.

The fuel manifold was examined; the filter screen was clear of debris, and no fuel was present. All fuel injectors were found to be open and without contamination. The fuel strainer was intact and clear of contaminants. The throttle-body metering unit was impact-damaged and separated from its mount. The flexible fuel hose connected to the throttle body unit was severed and fire- and impact-damaged, but the metering unit remained intact. A compacted contaminant was found obstructing the entire fuel filter screen in the metering unit that was further examined by the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC, and determined to be dirt that had come in contact with aviation fuel.

The propeller separated from the crankshaft propeller flange and was found in the debris path about 36 ft from the engine. Blade one exhibited a slight rearward bend and chordwise scratching on the outboard section. Blade two exhibited rearward bending, twisting, and chordwise scratching and paint transfer over its entire length. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Division of Forensic Sciences, Central Regional Lab, Berrien County, Georgia, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was thermal and blunt force injuries, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on samples from the pilot. The testing identified cetirizine, a potentially-impairing antihistamine, in blood and urine, salicylate (aspirin) in urine, and 16% carbon monoxide in blood.

Additional Information

Fuel Source and Fueling Operations

According to the pilot's ground assistant, the pilot had used his own trailer-based 450-gallon fuel tank for flight operations since the fall of 2015. The fuel tank was used for multiple flights on the day before and day of the accident. He further reported that the week before the accident, he and the pilot refueled the tank with 120 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel from the self-service fuel pump at TMA.

The ground assistant reported that two interconnected fuel hoses were attached to the fuel tank. The fuel tank was originally equipped with a 10-ft fuel hose, and the week before the accident, the pilot added a 20-ft extension. The ground assistant further reported that normally during preflight preparation, if fuel had not been pumped for a few days or more through the hose, they would run 1 or 2 gallons of fuel through the hose because of a brown discoloration in the fuel. He added that, after pumping a few gallons, the fuel would return to a "normal blue" 100LL color and then fuel would be added to the airplane.

Three days after the accident, an FAA inspector drained fuel from the pilot's trailer-based fuel tank and reported that the fuel sample was "clean and blue" and that he observed no debris. Additionally, 10 days after the accident, an NTSB investigator observed the pilot's ground assistant pump fuel samples through the 30-ft fuel hose into clear containers. The first 1 to 2 gallons of fuel pumped appeared dark green, but, as the pumping continued, the fuel appeared light blue, consistent with 100LL fuel.

The NTSB Materials Laboratory examined the two fuel hoses from the pilot's trailer-based fuel tank. The fuel hoses were determined to be made of rubber, and both hoses appeared to be completely intact and showed no signs of chemical degradation.



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Alapaha, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA A188, registration: N3547Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A188, N3547Q, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Alapaha, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight. The flight originated at Berrien County Airport (4J2), Nashville, Georgia, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137.

According to an assistant who routinely supported the pilot during ground operations, the pilot planned to complete three aerial application flights the day of the accident. The first flight departed 4J2 at 0715 and returned about 1 hour and 15 minutes later. The ground assistant reported that the pilot stated, "everything seems good," and they began preparations for the second flight. The ground assistant loaded about 150 to 160 gallons of insecticide into the airplane and the pilot "topped off" the single fuel tank from his personal trailer-based fuel supply. The pilot put on his shoulder harness and flight helmet, and the airplane then departed at 0855.

According to two witnesses, they each reported that they heard the airplane "flying back and forth" near their separate properties about 0915. They both further reported that the engine noise went silent and subsequently heard the sound of an impact. The witnesses were not co-located, but both reported they were within 1/4 to 1/2 mile of the accident site at the time of the accident. Neither witness observed the airplane in flight.

The airplane was found in an upright position in an open plowed field in the vicinity of 31 degrees, 26.042 minutes north latitude, 083 degrees, 10.443 minutes west longitude. The field in which the airplane was found was just north of the field being sprayed.

The wreckage path, oriented along a 300-degree magnetic heading, commenced with broken branches, an estimated 30 feet above the ground, from trees bordering the two fields. There was then a ground scar about 60 feet beyond the trees, and about 20 feet beyond that was the separated, two-bladed metal propeller. The airplane came to rest about 20 feet beyond the propeller, heading the opposite direction, about 120 degrees magnetic. There were no ground scars between the initial ground scar and the airplane's final location.

All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces or their remnants.

The fuselage exhibited impact and fire damage; however, there was no evidence of fire in flight. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The right wing was found twisted forward of its normal position, the fuselage was canted to the right just forward of the firewall. The empennage displayed metal tearing to the right, all of which were consistent with the airplane having been in a left spin at initial ground impact. The separated empennage control surfaces were found under the rear fuselage.

Both flaps were found in an extended position. The flap handle, which was connected directly to the flaps, was found in a near-vertical position, past the flaps 20-degrees down position; however, the actual position of both the flaps and the handle prior to the initial impact could not be ascertained. The left fixed main landing gear was collapsed upward under the wing, and the right fixed main landing was separated from the wing.

Further examination of the cockpit revealed that the throttle control lever was found about 1/3 forward (from idle). The propeller control lever was found in the forward position (full rpm). The mixture control was found pulled aft (toward idle-cut-off), about 1 inch. The fuel ON/OFF valve was found in the ON position.

A four-point lever lock style buckle was identified latched with the shoulder harness buckle ends engaged in the lever lock. The instrument panel was consumed by the postimpact fire. A fire-damaged agricultural global positioning system was found mounted in the cockpit and was retained to attempt data extraction.

One propeller blade exhibited an aft bend, while the other remained straight. The propeller blade with the aft bend exhibited chordwise scratching from the mid-point to the tip of the propeller, while the straight blade only displayed chordwise scratches at the propeller tip.

The engine exhibited thermal damage. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression and suction were attained on all cylinders when the propeller flange was rotated. All twelve spark plugs were examined with no anomalies observed. Each magneto was removed and rotated manually; spark was observed at each individual ignition lead. The engine driven fuel pump drive coupling was intact and no anomalies were found when examined. The oil filter screen was removed from the oil pump housing and no contaminants were found.

The fuel manifold was examined; the filter screen was clear of debris and no fuel was present. The six individual fuel injectors were found to also be absent of debris. The throttle body/metering unit was found to contain debris, and the screen filter was damaged but remained inside the filter chamber. The fuel throttle/metering unit was retained for further examination. JASON E. WATSON: http://registry.faa.gov/N3547Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Alapaha, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA A188, registration: N3547Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A188, N3547Q, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Alapaha, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight. The flight originated at Berrien County Airport (4J2), Nashville, Georgia, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137.

According to an assistant who routinely supported the pilot during ground operations, the pilot planned to complete three aerial application flights the day of the accident. The first flight departed 4J2 at 0715 and returned about 1 hour and 15 minutes later. The ground assistant reported that the pilot stated, "everything seems good," and they began preparations for the second flight. The ground assistant loaded about 150 to 160 gallons of insecticide into the airplane and the pilot "topped off" the single fuel tank from his personal trailer-based fuel supply. The pilot put on his shoulder harness and flight helmet, and the airplane then departed at 0855.

According to two witnesses, they each reported that they heard the airplane "flying back and forth" near their separate properties about 0915. They both further reported that the engine noise went silent and subsequently heard the sound of an impact. The witnesses were not co-located, but both reported they were within 1/4 to 1/2 mile of the accident site at the time of the accident. Neither witness observed the airplane in flight.

The airplane was found in an upright position in an open plowed field in the vicinity of 31 degrees, 26.042 minutes north latitude, 083 degrees, 10.443 minutes west longitude. The field in which the airplane was found was just north of the field being sprayed.

The wreckage path, oriented along a 300-degree magnetic heading, commenced with broken branches, an estimated 30 feet above the ground, from trees bordering the two fields. There was then a ground scar about 60 feet beyond the trees, and about 20 feet beyond that was the separated, two-bladed metal propeller. The airplane came to rest about 20 feet beyond the propeller, heading the opposite direction, about 120 degrees magnetic. There were no ground scars between the initial ground scar and the airplane's final location.

All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces or their remnants.

The fuselage exhibited impact and fire damage; however, there was no evidence of fire in flight. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The right wing was found twisted forward of its normal position, the fuselage was canted to the right just forward of the firewall. The empennage displayed metal tearing to the right, all of which were consistent with the airplane having been in a left spin at initial ground impact. The separated empennage control surfaces were found under the rear fuselage.

Both flaps were found in an extended position. The flap handle, which was connected directly to the flaps, was found in a near-vertical position, past the flaps 20-degrees down position; however, the actual position of both the flaps and the handle prior to the initial impact could not be ascertained. The left fixed main landing gear was collapsed upward under the wing, and the right fixed main landing was separated from the wing.

Further examination of the cockpit revealed that the throttle control lever was found about 1/3 forward (from idle). The propeller control lever was found in the forward position (full rpm). The mixture control was found pulled aft (toward idle-cut-off), about 1 inch. The fuel ON/OFF valve was found in the ON position.

A four-point lever lock style buckle was identified latched with the shoulder harness buckle ends engaged in the lever lock. The instrument panel was consumed by the postimpact fire. A fire-damaged agricultural global positioning system was found mounted in the cockpit and was retained to attempt data extraction.

One propeller blade exhibited an aft bend, while the other remained straight. The propeller blade with the aft bend exhibited chordwise scratching from the mid-point to the tip of the propeller, while the straight blade only displayed chordwise scratches at the propeller tip.

The engine exhibited thermal damage. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression and suction were attained on all cylinders when the propeller flange was rotated. All twelve spark plugs were examined with no anomalies observed. Each magneto was removed and rotated manually; spark was observed at each individual ignition lead. The engine driven fuel pump drive coupling was intact and no anomalies were found when examined. The oil filter screen was removed from the oil pump housing and no contaminants were found.


The fuel manifold was examined; the filter screen was clear of debris and no fuel was present. The six individual fuel injectors were found to also be absent of debris. The throttle body/metering unit was found to contain debris, and the screen filter was damaged but remained inside the filter chamber. The fuel throttle/metering unit was retained for further examination.








ALAPAHA, GA (WALB) -   Officials in Berrien County and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash that left one man dead.

Nashville native, Jason Watson, was flying the plane when it crashed. 

It was a sad scene, as people kept driving by to look at the wreckage and briefly speak with WALB about the pilot. 

Some individuals said they heard the plane crash Friday morning and felt helpless when they got over to the scene. 

It was just before 9:30 in the morning when people working and living on the other side of a fence heard a crop duster buzzing over head.  

A normal sound that quickly made a turn for the worst. 

"It went blank. There wasn't no noise of the plane and you couldn't hear the motor running," explained witness James Davis.

"Five to ten seconds later, that's when I heard a boom. Then I seen the smoke. Then I rushed over here," said witness Ray Heath. 

Just moments after hearing the crash, people quickly headed over to help the pilot of the plane.

"I got there and I was expecting to see somebody standing outside the plane watching the plane burn, but it wasn't like that when I crossed the fence," said Davis. "Starting off I said, no I don't see him. I thought maybe he's out here somewhere, ya know. Sure enough, I rounded the plane and I was like, the pilot's in the plane, he's no longer, no longer alive."  

Watson did not survive. 

Davis said that it's a reminder of how dangerous working in the agriculture industry can be.

"Anything to do with agriculture is so dangerous," explained Davis.

The crash is still under investigation, but officials said they believe it could be mechanical. 

As for the pilot, friends, family and co-workers said Watson will not be forgotten. 

"I really hate it for him and his family. He was a really good guy. A really nice guy," said Davis.

"It's a horrible event. Our heart goes out to the family and our prayers are with them," said Sheriff Ray Paulk. 

And eyewitnesses said that it's a chilling memory they will never forget. 

"I don't think I'll ever un-see it," said Davis. 

The crash is still under investigation and WALB will continue to bring you new details as we get them. 

Story and video:   http://www.wfxg.com



ALAPAHA — The pilot of a crop-dusting plane was killed Friday in a crash in a rural Berrien County field, according to a witness.

The plane's pilot, Jason Watson, 31, of Nashville, was killed in the crash, said Berrien County Sheriff Ray Paulk.

The sheriff said the crash occurred after 9 a.m. Friday.

James Davis of Alapaha was working on peanut equipment in a field off Daniel Griffin Road around 9:15 a.m. when he heard the plane's engine quit.

"I felt a 'thump' and heard the crash," he said.

He and a friend who lives nearby, Ray Heath, jumped a fence and ran to the crash site, where they found one occupant in the plane.

"He was already dead," Davis said.

Berrien County Sheriff's Office and the Federal Aviation Administration were on the scene.

ALAPAHA, GA (WALB) -  The identity of the man killed in a plane crash this morning has been released.

Jason Watson, 31, was the pilot of the crop duster airplane. 

The crash happened around 9:30 a.m. near 1130 Daniel Griffin Road.

The FAA will be investigating the crash.

Some witnesses said they heard the plane make a sputtering sound and go silent.

Officials said this is leading them to believe it could have been a mechanical issue. However, they can't confirm that just yet. 

"Starting off I said, no I don't see him. I thought maybe he's out here somewhere, ya know. Sure enough, I rounded the plane and I was like, the pilot's in the plane, he's no longer, no longer alive," said witness James Davis.

The cause of this crash is still under investigation right now.

Source:   http://www.wistv.com

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