Friday, July 1, 2016

Piper PA-34-200, S & S Aircraft Inc., N44311: Accident occurred June 30, 2016 at Fairfield County Airport (KFDW), Winnsboro, Fairfield County, South Carolina

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

S&S AIRCRAFT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N44311

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 30, 2016 in Winnsboro, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA34, registration: N44311
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and commercial pilot were conducting a currency flight in the multi-engine airplane. After completing an instrument approach, they transitioned to a visual approach and prepared to land. The pilot flared the airplane too high, and the instructor advised the pilot to lower the nose and add power, which he did. The pilot again flared too high, and the instructor was concerned that the airplane was going to stall. The instructor started to reach for the controls when the pilot initiated a go-around. The instructor said the pilot simultaneously pushed both throttles forward and that the airplane suddenly rolled to the right at a height between 2 and 4 ft above the ground. The instructor did not take control of the airplane at any time. The airplane's right wing and main landing gear struck the ground, and the airplane veered off the right side of the runway. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical deficiencies that would have precluded normal operation. The horizontal stabilator trim actuator was positioned toward the full nose-up position, which most likely resulted in the nose of the airplane pitching up farther than expected when the pilot added power, which increased the airplane's angle of attack and exacerbated its already critically slow airspeed, resulting in an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain sufficient airspeed during a go-around, and the flight instructor's delayed remedial action, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the airplane's nose-up trim setting, which further increased its angle of attack upon application of engine power during the go-around.

On June 30, 2016, about 1230 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-200, N44311, sustained substantial damage during an aborted landing at the Fairfield County Airport (FDW), Winnsboro, South Carolina. The flight instructor and the commercial pilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private company. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at FDW about 1020. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instructional flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The flight instructor stated that the accident flight was the first time he had flown with the commercial pilot and the purpose of the flight was to get him recurrent. The flight instructor said they had flown for about 2 hours before they returned to FDW and executed the RNAV approach to runway 22. When the airplane reached the decision altitude for the approach, they transitioned to a visual approach and prepared to land. The landing gear was already down and the flaps were extended to 25 degrees.

The commercial pilot was at the controls and flared the airplane over the runway numbers, but was too high. He advised the commercial pilot to lower the nose and add power, which he did. The commercial pilot again flared too high and the flight instructor was concerned that the airplane was going to stall and started to reach for the controls when the commercial pilot initiated a go-around. The flight instructor said the commercial pilot simultaneously pushed both throttles forward and the airplane suddenly rolled to the right while at a height about 2- to 4 ft above the ground. The flight instructor, who never took the controls at any time, said it felt like the left engine was producing more power than the right engine. The airplane's right wing and main landing gear struck the ground. The airplane then veered off the right side of the runway, and spun about 180-degrees before coming to a stop upright.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed the right wing and fuselage were substantially damaged. The landing gear, both engines, and their respective propellers were also damaged. Both engines and the airplane's fuel system were examined and no pre-impact mechanical deficiencies were noted that would have precluded normal operation at the time of the accident. Examination of the horizontal stabilator trim revealed it was positioned toward the full nose-up position.

The flight instructor held a flight instructor certificate for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held an airline transport pilot rating for single-engine airplane. His last FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 7, 2016. He reported a total of 6,482 hours of flight experience. Of those hours, 780 were in multiengine airplanes, of which, 500 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The commercial pilot held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His last FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 21, 2016. He reported a total of 2,400 hours of flight experience. Of those hours, 1,900 hours were in multiengine airplanes, of which, 0 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The weather conditions reported at FDW, about the time of the accident included wind from 100 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and overcast clouds at 1,800 ft.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 30, 2016 in Winnsboro, SC
Aircraft: PIPER PA34, registration: N44311
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2016, about 1230 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-200, N44311, sustained substantial damage during an aborted landing at the Fairfield County Airport (FDW), Winnsboro, South Carolina. The flight instructor and the commercial pilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private company. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at FDW about 1020. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instructional flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The flight instructor stated that the accident flight was the first time he had flown with the commercial pilot and the purpose of the flight was to get him recurrent. The flight instructor said they had flown for about 2 hours before they returned to FDW and executed the RNAV approach to runway 22. When the airplane reached the decision altitude for the approach, they transitioned to a visual approach and prepared to land. The landing gear was already down and the flaps were extended to 25 degrees. The commercial pilot was at the controls and flared the airplane over the runway numbers, but was too high. He advised the commercial pilot to lower the nose and add power, which he did. The commercial pilot again flared too high and the flight instructor was concerned that the airplane was going to stall and started to reach for the controls when the commercial pilot initiated a go-around. The flight instructor said the commercial pilot simultaneously pushed both throttles forward and the airplane suddenly rolled to the right while at a height about 2 to 4 feet above the ground. The flight instructor said it felt like the left engine was producing more power than the right engine. The airplane's right wing and main landing gear struck the ground. The airplane then veered off the right side of the runway, and spun about 180 degrees before coming to a stop upright.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed the right wing and fuselage were damaged. The landing gear, both engines, and their respective propellers were also damaged. The airplane was retained for further examination.

The flight instructor held a flight instructor certificate for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held an airline transport pilot rating for single-engine airplane. His last FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 7, 2016. He reported a total of 6,482 hours of flight experience. Of those hours, 780 were in multiengine airplanes, of which, 500 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The commercial pilot held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His last FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 21, 2016. He reported a total of 2,400 hours of flight experience. Of those hours, 1,900 hours were in multiengine airplanes, of which, 0 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The weather conditions reported at FDW, about the time of the accident included wind from 100 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and overcast clouds 1,800 feet above ground level.

















AIRCRAFT:   1973 Piper PA-34-200, N44311, s/n 34-7450206

ENGINE(S) - M&M, S/N:  (2) Lycoming IO360-C1E6, s/n L-12632-51A & s/n L-1034-67A

PROPELLER(S):  (2) Hartzell HC-C2YK-2CGUF, destroyed

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE(S):   #1 Engine = 1700 SMOH; #2 Engine = 374.0 SMOH

PROPELLER(S):    #1 Prop = 403.5 SPOH; #2 Prop = 512.2 SPOH          

AIRFRAME:       TTAF = 7,684.5               

OTHER EQUIPMENT:      KX 155; TT31 Transponder; GNS430; Century 2000 Autopilot

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Pilot lost control upon landing resulting in hard landing and nose gear collapse.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Dual prop strikes, engine stoppages; nose gear damaged; gear door and under-fuselage damage.                                

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT: Airport KFDW, Winnsboro, South Carolina           

REMARKS: Keys are with aircraft salvage.    Logbooks with field adjuster in Atlanta, GA. Prior written permission from insurance company required for physical inspection of salvage.

Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com

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