Sunday, December 11, 2016

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, N69286: Accident occurred December 11, 2016 in Shoreham, Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

http://registry.faa.gov/N69286

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Farmingdale FSDO-11


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA069
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 11, 2016 in Shoreham, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N69286
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 11, 2016, about 1300 eastern standard time, a Beech A36, N69286, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power during cruise flight and subsequent ditching in the Long Island Sound, near Shoreham, New York. The private pilot and a passenger were not injured. The airplane departed from Long Island Mac Arthur Airport (ISP), New York, and destined for Westfield-Barnes Regional Airport (BAF), Westfield, Massachusetts. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, after reaching a cruise altitude of 5,500 feet, the engine started running rough. The pilot then pushed the mixture, propeller, and throttle controls to the full forward position. The engine was still running rough and getting worse. The pilot then decided to turn around and go back to ISP. During the turn back to the airport, the pilot noticed oil was covering the windscreen. He then declared an emergency and asked air traffic control for vectors to Igor I Sikorsky Memorial Airport (BDR), Bridgeport, Connecticut. The air traffic controller told him to turn north to a heading of 360 degrees, however, the pilot was having trouble keeping the airplane's wings level and did not want to turn that far to the north. The pilot then requested vectors to Calverton Executive Airpark (3C8), Calverton, New York. The controller told the pilot that 3C8 was 7 miles ahead of his current position.

At that time, the engine was still producing partial power and the pilot believed he could make the airport. A few seconds later, he saw parts, which he thought were from the propeller separate from the airplane. The engine then lost total power and the pilot told the controller they would not make the airport, and were going to ditch the airplane in the Long Island Sound near Shoreham, New York. The pilot remembered that the airspeed indicator read 80 knots just before contact with the water. Once they ditched in the water, the pilot and passenger opened the door, swam to a rock that was close by and waited for rescue personnel to arrive.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right wing spar was damaged and the engine had several holes in the crankcase. A front section of the crankshaft was fractured and the propeller was not recovered.


The airframe and engine were retained for further investigation.




NEW HYDE PARK, Long Island (WABC) -- The pilot of a plane who crash landed in Long Island Sound is speaking out exclusively to Eyewitness News.

Dr. Inderpal Chhabra is still thawing-out Monday night, barely 24 hours after he landed his single-engine plane in the 40-degree waters of Long Island Sound.

Dr. Chhabra was flying his Beechcraft Bonanza Sunday afternoon with his co-pilot when the engine began to shake.

"As soon as I reached cruising altitude it got a little bit of a shudder, so I looked at my co-pilot and was like, 'Should we turn back?' And he said, 'Yeah you should.' And the teacher, 'As soon as you think you should turn back, you should turn back,'" Dr. Chhabra said. "It was a controlled landing on the water, it was not a crash."

He says he and his passenger swam a short distance to a large rock, after waiting on the wing until the plane sank.

They were rescued by volunteer firefighters from Rocky Point.

"I was like, why is this taking them so long? We could see the police helicopters directly over us, so we knew that help was near, but it seemed like an eternity. But then I was so glad, a shout out to the Rock Point Fire Department and the Suffolk County Police. This is what we train for. Fly the plane all the way into the crash, and I'm so glad that's what I did. Up until the last minute that I hit the water, I was actually still flying the plane," Dr. Chhabra said.

Story and video:    http://abc7ny.com

A Sikh doctor has miraculously survived a plane crash after he managed to land the aircraft he was piloting on the frigid waters of an estuary near here and then along with his co-pilot swam to a large rock. Inderpal Chhabra, a 48-year-old prominent physician who resides in Woodbury, and co-pilot David Tobachnik, 59, of Coram, were flying a Beechcraft Bonanza when the engine began to shake. The plane took off from MacArthur Airport, Long Island, heading to Calverton, New York, but went down in the waters of the Long Island Sound on Sunday.

The two men crashed on the Long Island Sound and clung on to a rock in frigid waters before they were rescued off Shoreham, authorities said.

“As soon as I reached cruising altitude it got a little bit of a shudder, so I looked at my co-pilot and was like, ‘Should we turn back?’ And he said, ‘Yeah you should’,” Chhabra told WABC-TV.

“It was a controlled landing on the water, it was not a crash,” Chhabra said.

He said he and his co-pilot swam a short distance to a large rock, after waiting on the wing until the plane sank.

They were rescued by volunteer firefighters.

“I was like, why is this taking them so long? We could see the police helicopters directly over us, so we knew that help was near, but it seemed like an eternity,” Chhabra said.

“But then I was so glad, a shout out to the Rock Point Fire Department and the Suffolk County Police. This is what we train for. Fly the plane all the way into the crash, and I’m so glad that’s what I did. Up until the last minute that I hit the water, I was actually still flying the plane,” Chhabra said.


Source:   http://indianexpress.com


    


A small plane carrying two people crashed into the Long Island Sound off Shoreham on Sunday afternoon, authorities said.

The people, who were not identified, were taken to Stony Brook University Hospital “for evaluation,” a Suffolk fire rescue dispatcher said. He did not know their conditions.

The Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement Sunday that the crash occurred at 1:25 p.m. and involved a Beech BE36 aircraft.

“The pilot reported an engine power-related problem,” the FAA statement said. The agency said it will investigate the crash.

Shoreham resident Gary Berezuk, who lives near the site of the crash, said he heard a sound “like a truck hitting something in the road” on Sunday afternoon before he looked out his kitchen window and realized a small, white plane had crashed in the water.

He said the plane’s occupants stood on the wings of the plane before it became submerged in the frigid water, then clung to a rock for about 45 minutes until they were rescued.

“I heard something as I was, you know, sitting in my house and I didn’t think anything of it until . . . I went to the kitchen window and I saw a plane in the water,” he said “I said, ‘Oh my God,’ And that’s when I called 911.”

The plane was still above the surface of the water by the time he got out to his backyard, which sits on a cliff overlooking where the crash happened. Berezuk said he saw the two people standing on the wings of the plane.

“Then the plane started to nose-dive into the water, you know, from the weight of the engine, and slowly went in and started sinking,” he said. “And that’s when they had to jump off and luckily they got onto the rock.”

The plane became almost completely submerged within five minutes, he said.
Long Island
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Berezuk said he watched the two people hold onto the rock for about 45 minutes before they were rescued by a boat. The Rocky Point and Sound Beach fire departments responded to the scene, the fire dispatcher said.

Police and fire rescue were on the scene within about 15 minutes, and a helicopter was circling above the two people leading up to the rescue, Berezuk said.

By 2:15 p.m. only the tip of the plane’s tail was above the water, with one wing still visible just below the surface.

Story and video:   http://www.newsday.com



SHOREHAM, NY — A small plane lost engine power and crashed into Long Island Sound off Shoreham Sunday afternoon and two passengers were taken to a local hospital, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

The plane was headed for Calverton on the eastern end of Long Island when the pilot lost power around 1:30 p.m. and smoke filled the cockpit, said Jonathan Cinquegrana, a coast guard spokesman based in New Haven. The pilot than guided the plane into the water.

Two passengers, who have not yet been identified, were taken to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment, Cinquegrana said.

Cinquegrana said as of 3:30 p.m. the plane remained in the water and some fuel had leaked from the tanks. Local fire departments and first responders rescued the passengers and transported them to the hospital, he said. It was not clear Sunday where the plane had taken off from.

Source:   http://www.greenwichtime.com

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