Sunday, November 20, 2016

Ryan Navion A, N4976K: Fatal accident occurred November 19, 2016 in New Gretna, Bass River Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

WILLIAM LINDLEY: http://registry.faa.gov/N4976K 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Teterboro FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA052
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 19, 2016 in New Gretna, NJ
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION A, registration: N4976K
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 19, 2016, about 1902 eastern standard time, a Ryan Navion A, N4976K, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain, while maneuvering near New Gretna, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Ocean County Airport (MJX), Toms River, New Jersey. The flight originated from Hummel Field (W75), Saluda, Virginia, about 1730.

A friend of the accident pilot, who was also a pilot, owned a second home near Accomack County Airport (MFV), Melfa, Virginia. The accident pilot flew uneventfully from MJX to MFV during the day prior to the accident, for an overnight visit. On the day of the accident, both pilots flew their respective airplanes to W75 for dinner. After dinner, they both fueled their airplanes before departing for home (the accident pilot to MJX and the friend to MFV) about 1730. While enroute, they communicated with each other on frequency 123.45 MHz. During approach to MFV, about 1805, the friend experienced windshear and performed a missed approach. He advised the accident pilot of the strong wind conditions, which the accident pilot acknowledged. The friend radioed the accident pilot again about 1830 to check on him. The accident pilot replied that he was okay and had reached the Delaware Bay. No further communications were received from the accident airplane.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the accident flight proceeded on a relatively direct course until approximately 1849, when it encountered the leading edge of a cold front boundary. During the following 13 minutes, the flight completed numerous course deviations, including three complete left circuits and two right circuits, before impacting wooded terrain.

A debris path was observed; beginning with freshly cut tree branches and a section of right stabilizer tip and right elevator, and extended approximately 420 feet on a magnetic heading of north to the main wreckage. The right and left flaps, left wingtip, left aileron, and cabin roof were located about 340 feet along the debris path. The right aileron and left stabilizer tip were located about 390 feet along the debris path.

The main wreckage was inverted at the end of the debris path, with both wings separated. The right main landing gear and nose landing gear remained attached to the airframe and were observed in the extended positon. The left main landing gear had separated and the landing gear tire was located next to the main wreckage. The empennage and rudder remained attached to the airframe. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot, age 75, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He did not possess an instrument rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on May 7, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 800 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-1976, was manufactured in 1949. It was powered by a Continental E-185, 205-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 1993. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 3,501 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 548 hours since major overhaul.

The MJX airport was located about 16 miles northeast of the accident site. The recorded weather at MJX, at 1856, was: wind from 150 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 3 miles in mist; sky clear; temperature 12 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C, altimeter 29.64 inches Hg.

Atlantic City International Airport (ACY), Atlantic City, New Jersey, was located about 14 miles southwest of the accident site. The recorded wind at ACY, at 1730, was from 290 degrees at 24 knots, gusting to 31 knots.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email  assistance@ntsb.gov. 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP — A Beachwood man was identified late Sunday as the person killed in a small plane crash Saturday night in Bass River State Forest.

State Police said William Lindley, 75, was in the plane. Police gave no other details.

Lindley's small plane went missing Saturday night and was found Sunday afternoon by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter.

At about 10:55 a.m. Sunday, State Police received calls for the possible downed aircraft, police said in a news release. Troopers from the Tuckerton barracks responded to search.

Lindley's aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland, on Saturday en route to the Ocean County Airport, police said. It did not arrive as scheduled Saturday night and attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, police said. The pilot's cellphone was tracked and police were told the possible location of the plane, police said.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board's Twitter account, the plane was a Ryan Navion A, a single-engine, four-seat plane built by North American Aviation in the 1940s.

State Police spokesman Trooper Alejandro Goez said the plane was located in a heavily wooded area with difficult terrain, requiring the State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units to respond.

Goez did not say earlier Sunday evening whether anyone else had been in the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB were on scene investigating.

Source:   http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

BEACHWOOD — The pilot killed when his WW II-era plane crashed in a marsh in Burlington County on Saturday was identified as a 75-year-old Beachwood man, State Police said.

Trooper Alejandro Goez, a State Police spokesman, identified the pilot as William Lindley. Goez declined to comment further, and said the Federal Aviation Administration was leading the investigation of the crash.

FAA spokeswoman Arlene Salac said Sunday that the two-seater Navion A aircraft was found Sunday at approximately 1:30 p.m., adding that the FAA continues to investigate and that the National Transportation Safety Board will work to figure out what caused the crash.

FAA records indicate Lindley was issued a license on April 1, 2010, as a private pilot for single-engine aircraft. 

The Ocean County Airport-bound aircraft failed to arrive Saturday.

The records indicate he was required to wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision.

State police said authorities received a call just before 11 a.m. regarding a possible downed aircraft within the Bass River State Forest, a 29,000-acre site that covers Burlington and Ocean counties.

Authorities said the plane left Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday. Following failed attempts to contact the pilot, state police tracked the pilot's cell phone to determine the plane's possible location.

A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter later located the wreckage.

Source:   http://www.nj.com



A 75-year-old man was killed when an airplane he was piloting crashed in a marshy area of New Jersey on Sunday, New Jersey State Police officials said. 

William Lindley, of Beachwood, was the only person on the plane when it crashed. 

State police officers received a call about a possibly downed aircraft in the Bass River State Forest just before 11 a.m., authorities said. 

The two-passenger aircraft crashed in a marshy area of the forest at around 1:30 p.m. Sunday, the FAA said. 

The aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland yesterday and was en route to the Ocean County airport. Authorities said the plane didn't arrive as scheduled last night.

After unsuccessful attempts to communicate with Lindley, police were able to track his cellphone and notify Tuckerton troopers of the plane's location.

A multiagency search began Sunday morning and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Source:  http://www.nbcnewyork.com


A small plane bound Saturday for Ocean County Airport was found Sunday afternoon, crashed in Bass River State Forest, according to the New Jersey State Police.


The pilot, William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, N.J., was killed in the crash, state police said.


An investigation is being conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board.


Authorities began searching for the plane, which could hold two people, around 11 a.m. Sunday after they could not make contact with Lindley, who had been scheduled to land in Ocean County on Saturday, state police said in a statement.


The plane had departed from an airport in Salisbury, Md., police said. After it did not arrive in Ocean County, authorities tracked the pilot's cellphone signal to the Bass River State Forest, where the New Jersey State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units began looking for the aircraft.


New Jersey State Police said around midafternoon Sunday on Twitter that a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter had located the plane and that police were heading to the crash site.


Police said Lindley was the only person aboard when the plane went down for reasons that were not immediately clear.


Source:   http://www.philly.com

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. --  State police have identified a pilot killed after a small plane crashed in the Bass River State Forest in Burlington County.


The pilot has been identified as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey.


Authorities say the Ryan Navion plane had departed from Salisbury, Maryland, on Saturday, but failed to arrive at Ocean County Airport in New Jersey on Saturday night as scheduled.


After attempts to communicate with Lindley were unsuccessful, the pilot's cellphone was tracked to the area where the plane was found. A multi-agency search began Sunday morning, and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later.


Officials say the pilot was alone in the plane.


The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Source:   http://6abc.com

A pilot died from his injuries after a small plane crashed in the Bass River State Forest in Burlington County, according to the NTSB.

Authorities say the plane had departed from Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday but failed to arrive at Ocean County Airport in New Jersey on Saturday night as scheduled.

After attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, the pilot's cellphone was tracked to the area where the plane was found. A multiagency search began Sunday morning and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later. Officials later confirmed the pilot, identified as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey, died in the crash. He was the only person on the plane.

Source: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. (WTXF) - A Coast Guard helicopter found the downed plane from Maryland was supposed to land at New Jersey's Ocean County Airport, Saturday night, but never arrived.

That Coast Guard chopper found the wreckage in the Bass River State Forest, and New Jersey State Police ground personnel got there and secured the scene.

New Jersey State Police have identified the pilot as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have also arrived, and they'll take over the investigation.

New Jersey State Police reported getting a call just before 11am Sunday about a possible downed aircraft at the Bass River State Forest. Troopers from Tuckerton Station immediately responded to search.

They say two passenger aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday. Unfortunately, the plane did not arrive as scheduled.

Then, attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful. The pilot's cellphone was tracked and Tuckerton Station personnel were advised of the possible location of the plane.

Source:   http://www.fox29.com

WASHINGTON TWP., N.J. (CBS) — Authorities say one person is dead after a Navion-A aircraft has crashed in a New Jersey state park.

The plane went down around 11 a.m. The United States Coast Guard helicopter located the downed plane in a marshy area in the Bass River State Forest after a search.

State Police have identified the victim as 75-year-old William Lindley from Beachwood, New Jersey.

Officials say the two passenger aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday en route to Ocean County Airport. The plane did not arrive as scheduled Saturday night and attempts to communicate with the pilot had been unsuccessful. The pilot’s cellphone was tracked and Tuckerton Station personnel were advised of the possible location of the plane.

The FAA and NTSB are now investigating what caused the crash.

Source:   http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, NJ —A two-passenger plane bound for New Jersey from Maryland has been found in Bass River State Forest, New Jersey State Police said Sunday afternoon.

State Police reported at 1:30 p.m. that authorities were searching for the plane in the state forest, on the border of southern Ocean and northern Burlington counties. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter located the plane, which had been tracked via the pilot's cellphone, state police said.

State police did not release any information on the pilot or say whether the pilot was alone or had a passenger.

The plane departed from Salisbury, MD, to Ocean County Airport, also known as Robert J. Miller Airpark in Berkeley Township, on Saturday, but did not arrive as scheduled, state police said.

State Police were notified shortly before 11 a.m. Sunday after attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, they said.

The pilot's cellphone then was tracked to Bass River State Forest and the New Jersey State Police Tuckerton Station were advised of the possible location of the plane, state police said.

The New Jersey State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units also participated in the search.

The weather on Saturday changed from warm and sunny in the early afternoon to cold and extremely windy as a cold front moved across New Jersey Saturday night.

The National Weather Service issued a high winds advisory Saturday, warning of winds gusting to 40 to 50 mph, and the winds were strong enough that authorities lower the speed limit to 45 mph for bridges crossing the Delaware River between New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Gusts of more than 40 mph were recorded in Fortescue, a town on the Delaware Bay between Salisbury and Berkeley Township, on Saturday evening between 6 and 9 p.m., according to state climatology data reported online through Rutgers University.

The front also brought rain, hail and even some snow to southern New Jersey.

Source:   http://patch.com

No comments: