Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Cessna 172, Mission Aviation Training Academy, N539MT: Accident occurred June 06, 2016 in Arlington, Snohomish County, Washington

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Seattle FSDO-01

Mission Aviation Training Academy:   http://registry.faa.gov/N539MT

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA286
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 06, 2016 in Arlington, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/15/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N539MT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, he made a normal landing, but the airplane began to veer left of the centerline during the landing roll. He corrected with right rudder and heard a “thump” as if something affixed to the airplane was being dragged, and the rudder steering became ineffective. He recalled that, with constant hard right rudder input, coupled with dynamic braking, he turned the airplane to the right, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane skidded to a stop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

Photographs provided by the Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right steering rod end had failed and that the bolts of the nose gear firewall mount were pulled from the firewall. The nose gear assembly had rotated more than 90° to the left and was found underneath the fuselage.   

The NTSB investigator-in-charge asked that the two additional airplanes in the operator’s inventory be inspected. The operator found that the steering rod ends of the inspected airplanes were bent and showed signs of cracking between the threads. The steering bungees were visually inspected; however, they could not be thoroughly inspected without damaging the component. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the airplane’s right steering rod end, which resulted in the pilot’s inability to maintain directional control.

According to the pilot of the tri-cycle landing gear-equipped airplane, he made a normal landing, but the airplane began to veer left of the centerline during the landing roll. He corrected with right rudder and heard a "thump" as if something affixed to the airplane was being dragged and the rudder steering became ineffective. He recalled that with constant hard right rudder input, coupled with dynamic braking, he turned the airplane to the right, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane skidded to a stop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The photographs provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector revealed that the right steering rod end had failed. Photographs also revealed that the bolts of the nose gear firewall mount were pulled from the firewall. The nose gear assembly had rotated more than 90° to the left and was found underneath the fuselage. 


The NTSB Investigator-in-charge asked that the two additional airplanes in the operator's inventory be inspected. The operator found that the steering rod ends of the inspected airplanes, were bent and showed signs of cracking between the threads. The steering bungees were visually inspected; however, they could not be thoroughly inspected without damaging the component. 

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA286
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 06, 2016 in Arlington, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N539MT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tri-cycle landing gear-equipped airplane, he made a normal landing, but the airplane began to veer left of the centerline during the landing roll. He corrected with right rudder and heard a "thump" as if something affixed to the airplane was being dragged and the rudder steering became ineffective. He recalled that with constant hard right rudder input, coupled with dynamic braking, he turned the airplane to the right, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane skidded to a stop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The photographs provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector revealed that the right steering rod end had failed. Photographs also revealed that the bolts of the nose gear firewall mount were pulled from the firewall. The nose gear assembly had rotated more than 90° to the left and was found underneath the fuselage. 


The NTSB Investigator-in-charge asked that the two additional airplanes in the operator's inventory be inspected. The operator found that the steering rod ends of the inspected airplanes, were bent and showed signs of cracking between the threads. The steering bungees were visually inspected; however, they could not be thoroughly inspected without damaging the component. 

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