Sunday, May 15, 2016

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, San Diego Skylane LLC, N133BW: Fatal accident occurred May 15, 2016 in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, California

San Diego Skylane LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N133BW

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA111
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 15, 2016 in Altadena, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA R182, registration: N133BW
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 15, 2016, about 0829 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna R182, N133BW, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during cruise flight near Altadena, California. The airplane was registered to San Diego Skylane LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from Montgomery Field, San Diego, California, at 0737, with an intended destination of the Santa Monica Airport (SMO), Santa Monica, California.

Preliminary information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) indicated that the pilot was being vectored for an instrument approach to SMO. The pilot established radio communication with the controller and subsequently acknowledged obtaining weather information at the destination airport. About 2 minutes, 26 seconds later, the controller issued the pilot a heading change to 290 degrees and a descent clearance to 3,000 feet for vectors to final approach. However, the controller received no response from the pilot despite multiple attempts over the course of about 2 minutes. The pilot then transmitted that he was on a 030 degree heading. The controller continued to issue vectors away from rising terrain and made several attempts to communicate with the pilot; however, no further radio communication from the pilot were heard. Radar contact with the airplane was subsequently lost and an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued by the FAA. The wreckage was located later that evening by a Los Angeles County Sheriff Office air unit. The wreckage was located within mountainous terrain near Brown Mountain, about 2 miles north, northwest of Altadena. Law enforcement personnel and initial responders reported that the airplane was mostly consumed by a post impact fire. Recovery of the wreckage is currently pending.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




SAN DIEGO (CBS 8) - Newly released recordings reveal that Dr. Thomas Bruff, the pilot killed in a small plane crash in the Los Angeles National Forest Sunday, lost contact with air traffic controllers moments before the crash.

The Cessna R182 Skylane RG was flying from Montgomery Field in San Diego to Santa Monica when it crashed into Brown Mountain. The last radar contact was around 8:30 a.m.

The audio recordings reveal the urgency in air traffic controllers' voices as they tried to communicate with Dr. Bruff because he was flying too low. Their efforts to get him to a higher elevation were met with silence.

According to the audio recordings, Dr. Bruff was in constant contact with air traffic controllers as he made his way from Montgomery Field in San Diego to Santa Monica.

As he flew over Los Angeles, the 57-year-old pilot went silent.

Air traffic controllers repeatedly tried to reach him to warn him about his low altitude. All contact was lost with Dr. Bruff about six miles North of the Rose Bowl.

The white Cessna 182 aircraft with blue stripes was located about 4:30 p.m. Sunday at the 4,000-foot level about four miles north of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Six search-and-rescue teams worked for hours to locate the plane.

Dr. Bruff's body was recovered Monday night.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating what caused the crash.


Story and video:  http://www.cbs8.com



A San Diego doctor died Sunday when the plane he was piloting crashed in the Angeles National Forest.

Thomas C. Bruff, M.D., 57, loved to fly and was an experienced pilot, one of his employees told NBC 7 Tuesday.

"He loved to fly," Gina Montoya said. "That's one of the biggest things that he loved to do and he did it often, almost every weekend and multiple times during the week."

Gina Montoya worked as Bruff’s assistant for four years. When he didn't show up for work Monday at his office on Waring Road, she says she knew something bad had happened.

The Los Angeles County Coroner confirmed Tuesday that Bruff was the pilot killed in a  Cessna 182 single-engine light plane that crashed Sunday morning near Mount Wilson Road and State Route 2.

Bruff was flying from Montgomery Field Airport to Santa Monica Municipal Airport when the plane lost contact 17 miles east of Van Nuys, according to a Federal Aviation Authority spokesman.

Bruff also had an office in El Centro. The Imperial Valley Occupational Medicine office posted a notice to its patients informing them of the news.

"We are all saddened by Dr. Bruff's sudden passing. We remain committed to providing quality medical care to your employees and injured workers," the statement reads.

Pilot in Fatal LA-Area Crash Member of Montgomery Field Flying Club[DGO] Pilot in Fatal LA-Area Crash Member of Montgomery Field Flying Club

Montoya said Bruff was good father, a good friend and a Padres fan who also found time to volunteer.

"He volunteered after the earthquake in Ecuador and in Nepal, and he took care of a lot of people and did a lot of medical expeditions like that, and he was just a great person," she said.

"He was just a really great man and everyone loved him," Montoya said.

The San Diego-based plane is owned by Tom Reid, who leases it to experienced pilots.

The cause of the crash will be determined following an FAA investigation.


Story and video: http://www.nbcsandiego.com 

An image from the website FlightRadar24, showing the flight path of the Cessna R182 Skylane RG plane that went down in the Angeles National Forest on the morning of May 15, 2016.

An image from the website FlightAware, showing the flight path of the Cessna R182 Skylane RG plane that went down in the Angeles National Forest on the morning of May 15, 2016.


ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST >> A small airplane crashed in the Angeles National Forest north of Altadena Sunday morning, killing a man. 

One unidentified man was pronounced dead at the crash scene, Deputy Kimberly Alexander of the Los Angeles County sheriff’s Information Bureau said. There were no initial reports of any additional injuries or any additional people on board the plane, she said.


Rescuers searched the Angeles National Forest near Mount Wilson for more than seven hours before finding the crash site after the small airplane vanished from radar amid inclement weather Sunday morning, officials said.


The missing aircraft was first reported shortly after 9:10 a.m., Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials said.


“Apparently, it went off radar,” sheriff’s Lt. Randy Tuinstra said.


Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer confirmed officials lost communications with the single-engine airplane.


“We have a reported missing aircraft, a Cessna 182. ... Traveling from Montgomery Field in San Diego to Santa Monica Municipal Airport,” he said. “Contact was lost 17 miles east of Van Nuys.”


No witnesses reported seeing the aircraft in trouble, Tuinstra said.


According to FlightRadar24.com, the aircraft’s last reported altitude was about 4,000 feet below the elevation of nearby mountain tops.


Bad weather prevented sheriff’s department helicopters from joining the search.


“Visibility is very, very low right now,” Tuinstra said Sunday morning. “We’re hoping that will burn off soon and we can get a better look.”


Members of the Montrose, Altadena, San Dimas, Sierra Madre and Santa Clarita search and rescue teams continued scouring the area on the ground until the weather improved in the afternoon, allowing search helicopters to join in the operation, officials said.


The aircraft crash site was found near the 4,466-foot-tall Brown Mountain, in the forest north of Altadena, according to Deputy Juanita Navarro-Suarez of the sheriff’s Information Bureau.


The airplane is registered to San Diego Skylane LLC, according to FAA records. It has a valid, standard-classification flight certification


Original article can be found here: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com


SAN DIEGO – A small airplane that had departed from a San Diego airport was discovered crashed in the mountains north of Pasadena Sunday.

The white Cessna 182 aircraft with blue stripes was spotted before 9 a.m. near Mount Wilson in the Angeles National Forest, according to a Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatcher. 


The wreckage was near Mount Wilson Road at the Angeles Crest Highway, state Route 2.


A heavy deck of clouds limited visibility to 200 feet, the dispatcher said.


“They (search and rescue teams) can see it, but they’re unable to tell if there are any passengers,” she said. “They’re having an access problem.”


The FAA reported that the pilot had indicated a flight from San Diego to Santa Monica, west of Los Angeles. The crash site was not on a direct route, as Mount Wilson is about 90 miles northwest of San Diego and 35 miles northeast of Santa Monica.


Radar data from Flightaware.com showed that the plane had departed from Montgomery Field in San Diego at 7:37 a.m. today, and was apparently in an approach pattern to Santa Monica Airport when it flew in a straight line to the northeast. The radar path ended near Mount Wilson.


FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the plane had been en route from Montgomery Field to Santa Monica. It lost contact with ground controllers when it was 17 miles east of Van Nuys Airport, but no time of the contact loss was released.


The Cessna’s tail number was N133BW, and FAA records indicate it was owned by a San Diego company.


Original article can be found here:   http://fox5sandiego.com


SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — 5:10 p.m. — Authorities have located the crashed Cessna 182 in the Angeles National Forest, discovering the plane at approximately 4 p.m. Sunday afternoon, Los Angeles County Sheriff's department confirmed. Rescue crews searched through the mountain for hours, battling low visibility due to foggy conditions. 

One male was discovered dead in the wreckage. Officials do not believe there were any other passengers on board. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is handling the investigation. 

12 p.m. — A Cessna 182 with tail number N133BW was found crashed in the Angeles National Forest. The plane had departed from Montgomery Field in San Diego at 7:37 a.m. Sunday morning and was en route to Santa Monica. The aircraft was in a holding pattern to Santa Monica Airport when it flew in a straight line to the northeast. The radar path dropped near Mount Wilson.    

11:26 a.m. — A small aircraft that departed from a San Diego airport was found crashed in the Angeles National Forest, north of Pasadena. A white Cessna 182 aircraft with blue stripes was discovered before 9 a.m. Sunday morning near Mount Wilson, according to a Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatcher. 

The crash was near Mount Wilson Rd. at the Angeles Crest Highway, state Route 2. 

Heavy clouds in the skies limited visibility to 200 ft., according to the dispatcher. "They (search and rescue teams) can see it, but they're unable to tell if there are any passengers," she said. "They're having an access problem."

The FAA indicated that the pilot was on a flight from San Diego to Santa Monica. The location of the crash was outside of a direct route to the pilot's destination. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.kusi.com



LOS ANGELES (AP) - The body of a pilot has been found in the wreckage of a small plane crash in the mountains north of Los Angeles.

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Kimberly Alexander said the Cessna 182 was found in Brown Mountain, in the Angeles National Forest above Altadena Sunday afternoon.

She said one body was found at the scene.

Crews on the ground and in the air had been looking for the aircraft after the plane was reported missing Sunday morning during a flight from San Diego to Santa Monica.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane was about 17 miles east of Van Nuys when contact was lost.

The search was hampered by low clouds earlier in the day.

2 comments:

LDighera said...

Why did ATC vector the flight toward the mountains on a heading of 030?

That isn't mentioned in the NTSB preliminary report: WPR16FA111; why was it omitted?

Anonymous said...

They vectored the guy onto the downwind for the approach, which starts out in that area. It's standard procedure for that approach into SMO when coming from the south.