Monday, April 7, 2014

Robinson R22 BETA, Rotortrends Inc., N13HG: Fatal accident occurred April 06, 2014 in Green River, Utah

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA158
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 06, 2014 in Green River, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/17/2015
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22 BETA, registration: N13HG
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot's family reported that the purpose of the flight was to look for shed elk antlers. When the helicopter did not return, a search was initiated. The wreckage was located the following day on the side of a gully in rough terrain.

Onsite wreckage documentation revealed that the main rotor blades did not show evidence of rotation at the time of ground contact, and the rotating components of the airframe exhibited little damage. The gascolator container was stained an orange/brown color at the bottom and along the sides. Fluid drained from the gascolator was colorless but murky and had a faint smell of gasoline. A water/alcohol-indicating paste test revealed water contamination in the sample. If the pilot had drained fuel from the helicopter's fuel tank or gascolator before the flight, he would most likely have discovered the contamination. Other than the contaminated fuel, postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the helicopter.

The pilot kept aviation fuel in a barrel on his property, and he would pump the fuel into 5-gallon plastic cans, which he used to fuel the helicopter. Testing of the fluid in some of the cans revealed significant water contamination. One of the cans contained a mixture of about 50 percent aviation fuel and 50 percent water, and another contained a mixture of about 85 percent aviation fuel and 15 percent water.

The lack of damage to the main rotor blades and the rotating components of the airframe indicate that it is likely that the engine experienced a loss of power due to water contamination of the fuel. In order to spot antlers, the pilot was likely maneuvering at a low altitude; therefore, he had little time to react to a loss of engine power or locate a suitable landing site in the rough terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to fuel contamination while maneuvering at a low altitude and the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection, which failed to detect the contamination.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 6, 2014, about 1215 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R22 Beta II, N13HG, collided with terrain near Green River, Utah. The pilot was operating the helicopter under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and one passenger sustained fatal injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The local personal flight departed from private property near Green River about 1115. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The family reported that the intention of the flight was to look for shed elk antlers. They reported that the helicopter was overdue about 1800 on April 6, and the Utah Highway Patrol initiated a search. Using signals from a cell tower and an emergency locator transmitter (ELT), they discovered the wreckage about 1300 the following day.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the 38-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and helicopter. The pilot held a certified flight instructor (CFI) certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter.

The pilot held a second-class medical certificate issued on March 24, 2014, with no limitations or waivers.

No personal flight records were located for the pilot. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) obtained the aeronautical experience listed in this report from a review of the FAA airmen medical records on file in the Airman and Medical Records Center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The pilot reported on his medical application that he had a total time of 7,800 hours with 200 hours logged in the previous 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was a Robinson R22 Beta II, serial number 2603. A review of the helicopter's logbooks revealed that the helicopter had a total airframe time of 2,828.6 hours at the most recent 100-hour inspection on April 26, 2013. The logbooks contained an entry for an annual inspection dated June 28, 2012, at a total airframe time of 2,440.8 hours. The hour meter read 2,889.6 hours at the wreckage examination.

The engine was a Lycoming O-360-J2A, serial number L-34900-36A. Total time on the engine was 2,889.6, and time since major overhaul was 744.7 hours.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The NTSB IIC, an NTSB investigator, and investigators from the FAA, Robinson Helicopters, Inc., and Lycoming Engines examined the wreckage on site.

The helicopter came to rest on its right side about a quarter way up the south slope of an east-west gully with a dry creek bed in the bottom. The slope changed at the midpoint of the fuselage; it was 55 degrees downhill below the wreckage and 40 degrees uphill above it. The creek bed was 30 feet away, and the bottom of the bluff was about 75 feet away. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a ground scar that was on a 255-degree magnetic heading. The vertical and horizontal stabilizer assembly separated, and was in a tree at the eastern end of the ground scar. A rock face was at the western end of the ground scar, and exhibited a 3-foot-diameter area of white marks with white paint shards at its base. The orientation of the fuselage was 180 degrees.

Both tail rotor blades separated a few inches from the hub. One blade was in the bottom of the gully; its fracture surface was angular and jagged. The other blade was in the tree with the stabilizer assembly; its fracture surface was angular and jagged and there was a dent in the leading edge near the tip. The aft skid crosstube was in the bottom of the dry creek about 30 feet from the tail rotor blade.

The main rotor blades were oriented north-south. The south blade did not exhibit any leading or trailing edge damage, but did have a puncture midspan and midchord that went through to the top of the blade. The north blade bent down about 2 feet from the hub; it did not exhibit any leading or trailing edge polishing or dents.

The engine did not show evidence of catastrophic failure. The exhaust exhibited ductile bending.

The bowl section of the carburetor separated, and was in the forward portion of the ground scar. Liquid was drained from the gascolator that was colorless, but murky, into two bottles. The fluid in one bottle had no smell; the other bottle had a faint smell of gasoline. A water/alcohol indicating paste was dipped into the liquid in both bottles; the paste changed color from pink to dark red, indicating water. The gascolator was removed; it contained an orange/brown colored fluid in the bottom and orange/brown colored stains along the sides. A water/alcohol indicating paste was dipped into the liquid; the paste changed color from pink to dark red, indicating water.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the pilot was conducted by the Office of the Medical Examiner, Utah Department of Health. The cause of death was reported as the effect of multiple blunt force injuries.

Toxicological tests on specimens recovered from the pilot were performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute Forensic Toxicology Research Team in Oklahoma City. Analysis revealed no findings for carbon monoxide or volatiles. Testing for cyanide was not accomplished.

The report contained the following findings for tested drugs: ibuprophen detected in urine.

Refer to the toxicology report included in the public docket for specific test parameters and results.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS)

The airplane was equipped with a Garmin GPSMap 396 GPS receiver. The unit sustained impact damage, and was sent to the NTSB Office of Research and Engineering for data extraction. The extracted data revealed a flight on April 6th. The initial data point at 1140:05 was not at the known departure point. The recorded flight began in the mountainous area where the pilot and passenger were looking for elk sheds. The path meandered in the area, and ended at 1211:59, about 1.6 nm from the accident site.

Follow Up Examination

Investigators from the NTSB, Lycoming, and Robinson Helicopters examined the wreckage in a hangar at Hurricane, Utah, on May 13, 2014. A detailed report is part of the public docket for this accident. No preimpact anomalies with the airframe or engine other than water in the fuel system were discovered.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Friends of the pilot indicated that he kept a barrel of aviation fuel outside of a building on private property. He would pump fuel from the barrel into 5-gallon plastic cans, which he in turn used to fill the helicopter. Investigators syphoned a sample from the barrel, and observed a light blue fluid that smelled like aviation gasoline. Investigators went to the building housing the gas cans, and observed seven cans. Four cans had enough liquid to drain into bottles. Fluid from two of the cans was light blue, and smelled like aviation gasoline; dipping a water/alcohol indicating paste into the liquid did not change the color of the paste. About 85 percent of the liquid from one can was light blue, and smelled like aviation gasoline. The remaining 15 percent was dark and murky; a water/alcohol indicating paste dipped into the murky liquid changed color from pink to dark red, indicating water. About 50 percent of the liquid from the fourth can was light blue, and smelled like aviation gasoline. The remaining 50 percent was dark and murky; a water/alcohol indicating paste dipped into the murky liquid changed color from pink to dark red, indicating water.


http://registry.faa.gov/N13HG

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA158 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 06, 2014 in Green River, UT
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22 BETA, registration: N13HG
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 6, 2014, at an undetermined time, a Robinson R22 Beta, N13HG, collided with terrain near Green River, Utah. The pilot was operating the helicopter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and one passenger sustained fatal injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The local personal flight departed from private property near Green River about 1115. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The family reported that the helicopter was overdue about 1800 on April 6, and the Utah Highway Patrol initiated a search. Using a signal from a cell tower and an emergency locator transmitter (ELT), they discovered the wreckage about 1300 the following day.

On-site documentation revealed that the white helicopter came to rest about 1/4 way up the south slope of an east-west gully with a dry creek bed in the bottom. The slope changed at the midpoint of the fuselage; it was 55 degrees downhill below the wreckage and 40 degrees uphill above it. The creek bed was 30 feet away, and the bottom of the bluff was about 75 feet away. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a ground scar that was on a 255-degree magnetic heading. The vertical and horizontal stabilizer assembly separated and was in a tree at the eastern end of the ground scar. A rock face was at the western end of the ground scar, and exhibited a 3-foot diameter area of white marks with white paint shards at its base. The nose of the cabin was in contact with the north end of the white marks on the rock face; the orientation of the fuselage was 180 degrees.

Both tail rotor blades separated a few inches from the hub. One blade was in the bottom of the gully; its fracture surface was angular and jagged. The other blade was in the tree with the stabilizer assembly; its fracture surface was angular and jagged and there was a dent in the leading edge near the tip. The aft skid crosstube was in the bottom of the dry creek about 30 feet from the tail rotor blade.

The main rotor blades were oriented north-south. The south blade did not exhibit any leading or trailing edge damage, but did have a puncture midspan and midchord that went through to the top of the blade. The north blade bent down about 2 feet from the hub; it did not exhibit any leading or trailing edge polishing or dents.

The engine did not show evidence of catastrophic failure. The exhaust exhibited ductile bending.



Robin Francis Venuti, 38, of Washington, Utah



LIHUE — A local tour flight operator died in a Mainland crash along with a passenger on Sunday, leaving a widow and two young daughters. 

Robin Francis Venuti, 38, of Washington, Utah, and his brother-in-law, Albert Munoz Rubio, 36, of Beaver Utah, reportedly died sometime Sunday in a remote area of southern Utah.

Robin and Dana Venuti took over Inter-Island Helicopter in 2010. The 24-year-old company flies out of Hanapepe.

Staff of Inter-Island Helicopter referred calls regarding the death of Venuti to a family member, who said they could not make statements at this point in the grieving process. The family is waiting for direction from widow and co-owner Dana Venuti and their two daughters, Lexi and Bella.

According to his business profile, Robin Venuti was raised in Escalante, Utah. He started his career at HeliTech in Riverside, Calif., before completing private, commercial and CFI courses in various aircraft to qualify as a lead instructor.

After Venuti and Rubio were reported overdue from a Sunday morning helicopter flight, the Utah Department of Public Safety initiated a helicopter search using infrared cameras on Sunday evening. The effort was suspended about midnight. The search resumed Monday morning. A Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter located the crash site on the west side of Desolation Canyon, about 40 river miles north of Green River, about 2:30 p.m. Monday.

Investigators confirmed there were no survivors. The bodies were recovered and transported by DPS helicopter to an Emery County off-road ambulance at 6:45 p.m.

The FAA is handling the crash investigation.


Story and comments/reaction:  http://thegardenisland.com

 GREEN RIVER — A search for two men who didn't return from a helicopter flight Sunday ended about 2:30 p.m. Monday when it was located.

"It is a crash site," Grand County Sheriff Steven White said.

No details were released about the crash, including the location. White was informing family members of the discovery.

The search covered at least three counties Sunday and Monday.

Pilot Robin Venuti and his passenger, Albert Rubio, took off about 11:15 a.m. in a white Robinson R22 helicopter to search for elk antler sheds, according to White.

"They were up here looking for sheds up the Green River corridor," he said.

The men were reported as overdue about 8 p.m. The Department of Public Safety was called Sunday night and brought in its helicopter to assist in the search. DPS flight crews used forward-looking infrared cameras to aid in the search, but the effort was suspended about midnight.

The search resumed Monday morning with helicopter crews from DPS and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, White said. Four small planes were also called in to aid in the effort, which encompassed parts of Carbon, Emery and Grand counties.

"We're working from here to the Colorado line," White said. "We're close to getting to the Uintah County line and up into Duchesne."

The sheriff said the helicopter could have covered about 200 miles with a maximum fuel load. He described the search area as "very treacherous terrain."

"It's tough, it's in extreme conditions," White said. "The cliffs are very narrow, very steep."

Venuti, 38, is from Washington, Utah. Rubio, 36, is from Beaver. The sheriff said Venuti's family described him as an experienced pilot.

Authorities in surrounding counties were contacted about the missing helicopter, and airports were checked in those counties to determine if the aircraft had landed within those jurisdictions, the sheriff's office said.

More information will be provided as it becomes available.


EMERY COUNTY –The two occupants aboard a missing helicopter found dead in Southeastern Utah were identified as Robin Venuti and his brother-in-law Albert Rubio.

Venuti, 38, of Washington City, was the pilot.

Venuti and Rubio, 36, of Beaver, left from the Green River area Sunday afternoon to search for Elk Antler sheds.

Venuti’s brother to FOX 13 News that Venuti was an excellent pilot and can’t imagine what happened.

The helicopter was reported overdue Sunday evening and was located Monday afternoon by a helicopter for the Department of Public Safety in the Range Creek area in Emery County.

Many of the family members of the victims are part of the aviation community and brought their own helicopters to help in the search, according the Grand County Sheriff’s Office.

It is unknown what caused the helicopter to go down but the crash site was located in a remote, steep area that is hard to get to by foot, officials said.

A cause could take serveral weeks to determine.

Venuti leaves behind a wife and small children.

A recovery operation is in progress.