Monday, April 22, 2013

Alon A-2 Aircoupe, N6369V: Accident occurred April 22, 2013 in Greenbrier, Arkansas

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA237 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 22, 2013 in Greenbrier, AR
Aircraft: ALON A2, registration: N6369V
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 22, 2013, about 1117 central daylight time, an Alon A2 airplane, N6369V, was destroyed after impact with terrain at Arkavalley Airport (12A), Greenbrier, Arkansas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, with no flight plan filed. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from the Dennis F. Cantrell Airport (KCWS), Conway, Arkansas at 1055.

According to a witness, the pilot attempted two landings on Runway 18, touching down briefly on each attempt and then performing a go-around. On the third landing attempt, the airplane touched down, bounced, and began to porpoise. About 1000 feet after the first bounce, the airplane departed the left side of the runway and subsequently struck a culvert. As the pilot initiated a go around, the airplane became airborne and impacted a tree to the left of the runway. The airplane subsequently impacted terrain and a post impact fire ensued, consuming the majority of the airplane.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 81, held a commercial pilot license with airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. On September 21, 2011, the pilot was issued a limited Class 3 limited medical certificate, which required corrective lenses be worn. At the time of exam, the pilot reported a total 1900 flight hours, with zero flight hours in the last six months. According to a friend of the pilot, it has been about 20 years since he had flown regularly.

The pilot had recently purchased the accident airplane and traveled to North Carolina to ferry it back to Arkansas. In conjunction with picking up the airplane, the pilot completed a biennial flight review on April 20, 2013 at the Harnett County Airport (KHRJ), Erwin, North Carolina. During this flight review, the flight instructor stated the pilot flew fairly well and safely, but not great. The flight instructor recommended to the pilot that he obtain additional flight instruction after returning to Arkansas.

The flight instructor was concerned with the pilot becoming fatigued during his return flights to Arkansas. The flight instructor discussed appropriate rest periods with the pilot, who chose to stop and remain overnight during his return trip. The flight instructor was unaware of the pilot’s home airport and there was no discussion of approach/landing considerations at the Arkavalley Airport.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, an Alon A2 (serial number A-45) was manufactured in 1965. It was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration on a standard airworthiness certificate for normal operations. The airplane had a total time of 3,654 hours as of the last annual inspection, which was completed on November 2, 2012. The airplane was equipped with a Continental C90 series engine. As of the last annual inspection, the engine had accumulated a total of 1,661 hours, with 287 hours since last major overhaul.

METEORLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather station at Little Rock Air Force Base (KLRF), located about 18 miles southeast of the accident site, reported the following conditions at 1158: wind 150 at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 21 degrees Celsius, dew point 8 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 30.14.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Arkavalley Airport, privately owned and managed, is located in a rural area five miles southeast of Greenbrier, Arkansas. The airport has one asphalt north-south runway (36/18), with dimensions of 3,133 by 40 feet. The runway slopes downward from both approach ends toward the center. All three approaches flown by the accident pilot were to Runway 18, which has a 131 foot ridge about 1000 feet from its approach end. Due to this obstruction, a steeper than normal approach angle is required to land on Runway 18.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest about 200 feet beyond the tree strike, facing southeast. The majority of the airplane was consumed by fire. Federal Aviation Administration personnel confirmed flight control continuity on scene. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On April 24, 2013, an autopsy was performed on the pilot by a medical examiner at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory. The cause of death was attributed to smoke and soot inhalation. The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the pilot. The test was negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and tested drugs.


 NTSB Identification: CEN13LA237 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 22, 2013 in Greenbrier, AR
Aircraft: ALON A2, registration: N6369V
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 22, 2013, about 1117 central daylight time, a Alon A2 airplane, N6369V, was destroyed after impact with terrain at Arkavalley Airport (12A), Greenbrier, Arkansas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, with no flight plan filed. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from the Dennis F. Cantrell Airport (KCWS), Conway, Arkansas at 1055.

According to a ground witness, the pilot attempted two landings on Runway 18, during which he touched down briefly and performed a go-around. On the third attempt, the airplane touched down, bounced, and began to porpoise. The airplane drifted to the left side of the runway and the pilot increased engine power. The airplane became airborne again and impacted a tree to the left of the runway. The airplane subsequently impacted terrain and a post impact fire ensued.


http://www.flickr.com/photo


(Photo courtesy of Corey Johnson)


ARKAVALLEY (KATV) – Faulkner County Sheriff Office reporting at least one dead in a small plane crash near a private airport. According to Arkavalley airport manager Bill Hooten, Monday morning around 11:20, a pilot aborted the landing of a plane but did not regain control. As the pilot attempted to steady the aircraft, it clipped a tree causing the crash. The pilot, Chuck Snyder, died from the impact.  

GREENBRIER - One person is dead following a plane crash at Arkavalley Airport in Greenbrier on Monday morning, the airport's manager said. 

Airport manager Bill Hooten said the plane crashed about 11:20 a.m., killing the pilot, who was the only person on board.

Hooten said the crash caused a fire, but crews were on scene extinguishing the blaze.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford said in an e-mail Monday afternoon that the aircraft was a single-engine Ercoupe.

Speaking by phone from the scene, Faulkner County Coroner Patrick Moore said it was too early to know what happened. He said the plane was badly burned.

Faulkner County sheriff's office spokesman Capt. Matt Rice said Federal Aviation Administration officials are on the scene and investigating the accident.

Lunsford said the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified, and would take over the investigation upon arrival. Phone calls to a NTSB official were not immediately returned.

A Faulkner County coroner's office official said the pilot's identification could not be released until it was confirmed, which the official said would be completed Tuesday morning.

Arkavalley Airpark resident Corey Johnson, who has lived in the neighborhood of the airport for about a year, said he had observed the pilot doing "touch-and-goes" — an exercise that involves landing, taking off and circling the airport.

Johnson said he saw the plane attempting to land on the north side of the runway, which he referred to as the "professional side" because of the power lines and trees in the way, as he entered his home.

"It's not a flat runway (coming from the north side), and you have to come over this hillside," Johnson said.

Most landing attempts are done on the south side of the runway, Johnson noted.

Johnson's wife said she heard what sounded like a crash, and Johnson said he immediately went to the scene and saw broken branches everywhere. He didn't comment on the condition of the plane.

"I saw the mushroom cloud going up, so I jumped in my truck and got to the scene as soon as possible to see if I could help out," Johnson said.



Story, Photos, Video:   http://m.thecabin.net