Sunday, May 27, 2018

Beechcraft P35 Bonanza, N263CE: Fatal accident occurred May 27, 2018 at Millard Airport (KMLE), Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 

Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N263CE 


Location: Omaha, NE
Accident Number: CEN18FA193
Date & Time: 05/27/2018, 0840 CDT
Registration: N263CE
Aircraft: BEECH P35
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 27, 2018, at 0840 central daylight time, a Beech P35 airplane, N263CE, impacted terrain following a loss of control during takeoff from Millard Airport (MLE), Omaha, Nebraska. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed by a post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident, and the destination was unknown.

According to witnesses, the airplane was attempting to takeoff from runway 30 (3,801 ft long by 75 ft wide). During the takeoff roll about 1,300 ft from the departure end of the runway, the airplane exited the left side of the runway, traveled through several grass medians between the runway and taxiways, onto several taxiway surfaces, and was briefly airborne during portions of the runway excursion. The airplane crossed the end of the runway, became airborne, and then appeared to stall. The airplane's right wing struck the terrain, the airplane cartwheeled, and a post-impact fire ensued. The witnesses stated the airplane looked like it was out of control during the takeoff sequence. During the runway excursion, the airplane impacted several runway and taxiway light structures.

Surveillance video showed the airplane during portions of the attempted takeoff. The video images were consistent with the airplane exiting the runway and traveling through the grass medians and taxiway surfaces.

Postaccident examination of the runway, grass medians, and taxiways showed markings consistent with the airplane's landing gear tires. The markings were consistent with the airplane departing the runway surface, traveling through the grass, and impacting runway and taxiway light structures. Portions of the grass and tire marks on the asphalt surfaces showed at various points during the takeoff roll; three tire tracks, two tire tracks, and one tire track.

The main wreckage came to rest inverted about 200 feet from the end of runway 30. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, left and right wings, and empennage. The main wreckage was consumed and destroyed by fire. The cabin door, propeller, engine cowling, and glare shield were located between the runway and main wreckage and displayed minor thermal damage. The engine was separated from the airframe and came to rest adjacent to the right wing.

At 0835, the MLE automated weather observing system reported the wind from 240 degrees at 7 knots, clear sky, and a temperature of 29 degrees C. The calculated density altitude was 3,150 ft. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N263CE
Model/Series: P35 P35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MLE, 1050 ft msl
Observation Time: 0835 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 240°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Omaha, NE (MLE)
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  41.195278, -96.113611

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 




OMAHA, Neb. —  Dave Steier, 63, and his wife, Arlene Steier, 61, were both private pilots. The couple was killed in a plane crash Sunday at the Millard Airport. Their loss is felt by their family and also the Omaha community who the Steiers touched through planes and politics.

"Their family and friends and the whole political community is really, really feeling the hurt on this one," said Douglas County Commissioner Mary Ann Borgeson.

Borgeson said Arlene was very involved in local politics. The two met when Arlene worked at the election commissioner's office.

"She really just was one of those mentors for me in the political arena," Borgeson said. "Sweetest lady, best demeanor, very welcoming."

Arlene was also involved with the Douglas County Republican Party. Her interests ranged from politics to planes.

She and Dave were both private pilots. Arlene was involved with the University of Nebraska-Omaha's Aviation Explorer's program. We spoke to her back in 2013 about sharing her passion with kids.

"I think it's very cool and I'm absolutely delighted that we can offer this opportunity, because as I've said before, there's fences around airports now and it's difficult for kids to find out what this is about," Arlene Steier said.

KETV also spoke with her at an aeronautics camp for kids in 2011.

"I really enjoy it," Arlene said. "There's nothing like lighting up a kid's eyes with possibilities."

Arlene and Dave Steier leave behind four children. Dave Steier comes from a large family. He was one of eight siblings.

The family is asking for privacy, but released the following statement to KETV Newswatch 7:

"On behalf of the entire Steier and Kemp families, we thank everyone for their personal outreach and support during this difficult time. They were beloved parents, grandparents, son and daughter, neighbors and friends. We love them very much and honor their beautiful memory. We are blessed to have had them, though for too short a time. They made an impact on so many and on the Omaha community."

Authorities still do not know who was piloting the plane at the time of Sunday's crash or what caused it to go down.

NTSB officials were expected to arrive in Omaha Monday night. They'll hold a news conference at the Millard Airport Tuesday at 10 a.m. to discuss the investigation.

Story and video ➤ http://www.ketv.com




OMAHA, Neb. —  Dave Steier, 63, and his wife, Arlene Steier, 61, were both private pilots. The couple was killed in a plane crash Sunday at the Millard Airport. Their loss is felt by their family and also the Omaha community who the Steiers touched through planes and politics.

"Their family and friends and the whole political community is really, really feeling the hurt on this one," said Douglas County Commissioner Mary Ann Borgeson.

Borgeson said Arlene was very involved in local politics. The two met when Arlene worked at the election commissioner's office.

"She really just was one of those mentors for me in the political arena," Borgeson said. "Sweetest lady, best demeanor, very welcoming."

Arlene was also involved with the Douglas County Republican Party. Her interests ranged from politics to planes.

She and Dave were both private pilots. Arlene was involved with the University of Nebraska-Omaha's Aviation Explorer's program. We spoke to her back in 2013 about sharing her passion with kids.

"I think it's very cool and I'm absolutely delighted that we can offer this opportunity, because as I've said before, there's fences around airports now and it's difficult for kids to find out what this is about," Arlene Steier said.

KETV also spoke with her at an aeronautics camp for kids in 2011.

"I really enjoy it," Arlene said. "There's nothing like lighting up a kid's eyes with possibilities."

Arlene and Dave Steier leave behind four children. Dave Steier comes from a large family. He was one of eight siblings.

The family is asking for privacy, but released the following statement to KETV Newswatch 7:

"On behalf of the entire Steier and Kemp families, we thank everyone for their personal outreach and support during this difficult time. They were beloved parents, grandparents, son and daughter, neighbors and friends. We love them very much and honor their beautiful memory. We are blessed to have had them, though for too short a time. They made an impact on so many and on the Omaha community."

Authorities still do not know who was piloting the plane at the time of Sunday's crash or what caused it to go down.

National Transportation Safety Board officials were expected to arrive in Omaha Monday night. They'll hold a news conference at the Millard Airport Tuesday at 10 a.m. to discuss the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ketv.com



OMAHA, Neb. — A man and a woman were killed in a plane crash Sunday at the Millard Airport, investigators confirmed to KETV NewsWatch 7.

The victims have been identified as M. David Steier, 63, and Arlene Steier, 61.

Rescue crews arrived around 8:50 a.m. and found a small plane on fire at the end of the runway.

"You could hear the boom outside," said Chad Langford, who was at the baseball fields near 138th Street and Millard Avenue.

Authorities said Arlene Steier was thrown from the plane during the crash. Crews transported her to a nearby hospital with CPR in progress. She later died at the hospital, according to an Omaha police official.

"We just seen all the smoke and all the fire trucks headed that way," added Craig Cox, who was also headed to the baseball fields.

Rescuers called for multiple fire engines and rescue squads initially, then scaled back the response after initial crews arrived. A medical helicopter was dispatched and then sent back.

"Our crews did a great job of locating the victims and then putting the fire out after we got the victim," said Joe Salcedo, assistant fire chief with the Omaha Fire Department.

Omaha police, Omaha Airport Authority staff and Federal Aviation Administration investigators were at the crash site for hours Sunday. They began cleaning up the wreckage around 4 p.m., towing the engine and the remaining parts of the plane to sheds at the airport. The Millard Airport was closed Sunday morning and reopened just before 6 p.m.

"Hate to see that happen," said Phil Frye, who lives near the airport. "Hate to see anybody lose their life over it."

Frye's concerns began far before Sunday's deadly scene.

"(The airport was) here first, as far as the argument goes, but things have changed out here," Frye said. "There's a lot of population around here."

He worries for the homes, businesses and kids playing in the area, including those baseball fields near 138th and Millard Avenue, where a student pilot made an emergency landing in January.

"After that plane landed on our field, yeah, you start to think twice about it and, you know, the thought of having some sort of procedure in place definitely has crossed our mind," said Langford, president of baseball for Millard United Sports.

Kids were playing on the fields when the plane went down Sunday morning.

It's a worry for parents and Frye, who hopes Sunday's tragedy will turn ignite a conversation.

"I think it's time to maybe look into additional restrictions or moving the facility," Frye said.

The last time the FAA inspected the Millard Airport was in 2015, recording an average of 198 planes landing and taking off each day.

The Omaha Airport Authority declined to comment on the airport's logistics until the investigation is complete.

National Transportation Safety Board officials are expected to arrive in Omaha Monday evening. Investigators said it could take five days to release a preliminary report, but plan to hold a press conference at 10 a.m. Tuesday to discuss the investigation.


Story and video ➤ http://www.ketv.com





OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) -- Authorities now say two people have died in the crash of a small plane at the Millard Airport Sunday morning. The second victim that was critically injured in the accident has since died from her injuries. The victims have been identified as 63-year-old M. David Steier and 61-year-old Arlene Steier.

Previously:

The crash was reported at approximately 8:45 a.m. on Sunday. First responders arrived to smoke and flames rising for an airport runway.

Assistant Omaha Fire Chief Joe Salcedo said, "The plane was fully involved, on fire."

Video shot moments after the crash shows a large plume of black smoke as emergency crews were arriving on scene where the small plane had hit the ground and burned.

Three medical units were dispatched and a medical helicopter was called.

The fire was quickly contained and authorities then confirmed that a man had died in the crash. Omaha Airport Authority Fire Chief Bernie Kanger said, "There is one fatality."

A woman was taken to the hospital in serious condition. Dispatch told 6 News that her condition deteriorated while en route to the hospital.

Wreckage was strewn across the area as officials began their preliminary investigation.

Traffic restrictions were in place as authorities began to piece together what happened. 132nd Street had been shut down between Q and Z but was reopened in both directions later in the morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified. They will send teams to take over the investigation.

The airport was shut down after the crash. Authorities on scene did not specify when operations would resume.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wowt.com

5 comments:

Steve Huntley said...

airports are usually built away from populations,then the area builds up and people complain. you know there is an airport there. no one has the right to whine. a family has lost loved ones. show some respect.

Anonymous said...

Forgot to remove control lock?

Anonymous said...

As usual, the same old "an airplane crashed so let's close down the airport" or "let's move it". Do people actually think before they insert foot in mouth? People die on freeways every day, let's close 'em down. An airplane can crash near an airport or many miles away from one. There is always an inherent risk anywhere you live. I observe flight training over my neighborhood on a daily basis. I've watched them practice stall recovery. What are you going do? That's life and they are within FAA guidelines. And there is no "procedure" for those on the ground when an aircraft suffers catastrophic engine failure. As a pilot you try to get your aircraft down safely but the ending is not always the one we want.

Anonymous said...

Control lock? That would also imply he hadn't completed the check list. Go figure. But who knows.

a said...

I wonder if something jammed the rudder peddles according to the guys who saw it happen the engine never seemed to reduce power. One would think if you veered off runway onto grass would cut the power. It's also possible the PIC had a medical problem on take off jammed the controls. Still you would think the other person would just cut the engine.