Sunday, October 16, 2016

Van's RV-4, N2626C: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2016 in Oregonia, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N2626C 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05


NTSB Identification: CEN17FA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2016 in Oregonia, OH
Aircraft: MAKELA URHO J RV 4, registration: N2626C
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2016, at 1740 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built experimental Makela Urho J RV-4, N2626C, collided with an aerial cable and the terrain in Oregonia, Ohio. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were both fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The aircraft was registered to the pilot and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from a private airstrip in Wilmington, Ohio, about 1708.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane flying at low altitudes at different locations prior to the accident. Three witnesses near the accident site reported seeing the airplane flying low just prior to the accident. One witness estimated the airplane was at an altitude of about 30 feet above the river and the other estimated about 50 feet above the tree tops. Both of these witnesses reported the engine sounded "strong" and at "full power." One of the witnesses momentarily lost sight of the airplane and when it came back into view, it descended into the trees.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Eric Hackney


TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP —

The Warren County coroner has identified two people killed in a Sunday evening plane crash.

Eric Hackney, 43, and Jesse Loy, 36, both of Punta Gorda, Florida, died of blunt force trauma as a result of the Sunday crash, coroner Doyle Burke said.

Scorched debris from the a single-engine plane crash remains on the side of a remote Turtle Creek Township hillside as investigators try to determine what went wrong.

The plane went down about a half-mile from Morgan’s Riverside Campground in a wooded area just off the bike path near Fort Ancient.

In the moments after the crash, people on the bike trail began to call 911.

“I think it obviously exploded when it crashed,” one caller said.

“God and them two are the only ones who know what happened for sure, but we can only think they had some sort of a malfunction,” said Clint Hackney, Eric Hackney’s brother. “The plane belonged to the pilot, the guy that was flying it. They left our personal runway and flew over to the Waynesville airport to get fuel, they got a full load of fuel and were doing some sightseeing.”

Witness Dirk Morgan said he saw a single-engine plane flying low, which was unusual. Moments later, he started hearing from friends nearby about a plane crash.

The plane went down in an area so remote, firefighters had to hand-carry gear to put the flames out. Morgan helped crews get through the thick underbrush.

“In many cases, we’re going through the underbrush and you could only see 10 feet in front of you.” Morgan said.

Even more challenging was the steep terrain, Morgan said.

“Incredibly steep. We were literally crawling on our hands and knees in some cases,” Morgan said. “I could grab a tree and grab a firefighter’s hand and help pull them up to the next level.”

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board remained on the scene into Monday afternoon. The cause of the crash has not been determined.


Story and video:   http://www.wlwt.com



TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP —   Scorched debris from a single-engine plane crash remains on the side of a remote Turtle Creek Township hillside as investigators try to determine what went wrong. 

The plane went down about a half mile from Morgan’s Riverside Campground in a wooded area just off the bike path near Fort Ancient.

In the moments after the crash, people on the bike trail began to call 911.

“I think it obviously exploded when it crashed,” one caller said.

“God and them two are the only ones who know what happened for sure, but we can only think they had some sort of a malfunction,” said a man who claims his brother was one of the victims in the plane.

WLWT is only identifying the man as “Clint” until a positive identification has been made on the two victims.

“The plane belonged to the pilot, the guy that was flying it. They left our personal runway and flew over to the Waynesville airport to get fuel, they got a full load of fuel and were doing some sightseeing,” Clint said.

Dirk Morgan said he saw a single-engine plane flying low, which was unusual.

Moments later, he started hearing from friends nearby about a plane crash.

The plane went down in an area so remote, firefighters had to hand-carry gear to put the flames out.

Morgan helped crews get through the thick underbrush.

“In many cases we’re going through the underbrush and you could only see 10 feet in front of you.” Morgan said.

Even more challenging was the steep terrain, according to Morgan.

“Incredibly steep. We were literally crawling on our hands and knees in some cases,” Morgan said. “I could grab a tree and grab a firefighter’s hand and help pull them up to the next level.”

Investigators with the FAA and the NTSB remained on the scene into Monday afternoon. No cause has been determined.


A forensic dental team is working to make a positive identification on the victims.

UPDATE@4:10 p.m.

Alan Wolfson, manager of the Warren County Airport outside Lebanon, said the crash did not involve a plane based there. Likewise, staff at the Red Stewart Airfield outside Waynesville said the plane was not based there.

The Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport north of Springboro has been closed for construction since Friday.

UPDATE @ 10:42 a.m.

Investigators suspect the victims of yesterday’s fatal plane crash in Warren County have local ties to the area.

But results of autopsies under way at the Miami Valley Crime Lab will also be used in determining the identities of the victims of the third fatal plane crash in the area in less than three months.

“If it’s who we think it is, they have local ties,” Doyle Burke, chief investigator for the Warren County Coroner’s Office, said Monday morning.

However Burke said the apparent victims did not live in the area.

Burke declined to identify the apparent victims, pending confirmation through dental records and notification of next of kin.

Today investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) were expected to arrive at the crash site, on state land near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

Emergency crews were first dispatched around 5:45 p.m. Sunday after callers reported smoke and flames coming from a low-flying plane.

The crash scene is in a remote, wooded area, east of Lebanon in Turtlecreek Twp., on property near a Church of God camp between the YMCA camp and Moore-Saur Road.

ATVs and boats were used to get to the site and a fire was put out without it spreading beyond the crash area.

The two-seat prop plane was heavily damaged and authorities were still working on Monday to identify its tail number.

It was not known where the plane was headed, nor from where it came.

Dirk Morgan said he looked up to see the smoking plane fall out of the sky Sunday.

“It came right through the treetops and then crashed to the floor,” said Morgan, owner of Morgan Riverside Camps on the Little Miami River.

Morgan used his knowledge of the rough terrain to help firefighters and first responders reach the crash site – roughly at the bottom of a cliff near the river.

“It’s an extremely steep hill, probably 300 vertical feet just to get down to the river valley - no roads, no trails,” said Morgan, a member of the family also operating a canoe rental business on the river.

“I went up to Moore-Saur Road to my neighbors’ property — the Church of God camp. First responders were there, and I helped them go over the hill and carry equipment down the hill,” Morgan said.

“I had to make two trips down to try to help them bring fire extinguishers and pick axes. … It was so steep you had to hold onto small saplings to keep from sliding 50 feet down the hill. So coming back up it was almost all fours, and I felt bad for the firefighters because they were in full turnout gear.”

Morgan said firefighters had to stop three times before reaching the spot.

Other firefighters arriving later took boats on the river or ATVs guided by GPS to get there.

“It’s along the Little Miami River between Strout Road and Fort Ancient SR 350. Those are the two bridges that it’s between,” Morgan said.

Morgan, one of the first at the scene, said he cringed at what he saw. The plane had sawed off trees as it fell.

“There were pieces of trees and then I kind of looked up. There was an opening in the big Sycamore trees that were down there and there were parts of the plane hanging from the tree limbs,” Morgan said.

“I just know I saw the smoking remains of what appeared to be a plane and parts, and I prayed for the families who lost their loved ones.

“I don’t think anyone survived,” he said before officials confirmed the worst. “I don’t know how they could.”

Burke and Sgt. Robert Burd of the Ohio State Highway Patrol briefed reporters at the staging area near Camp Kern.

“The plane’s burnt. It is a complete loss,” said Burd, assistant commander of the Lebanon Post.

Burke said it was impossible to tell even the sex or ages of the victims at the crash site.

He said the victims can be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.

At the time of the crash, winds of 8 mph were reported at the nearest reporting station, the Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport north of Springboro. There was possibly some light rain, but no reports of severe weather, according to WHIO TV Meteorologist Brett Collar.

Rain and thunderstorms are believed to have contributed to the crash that killed a Michigan man and his wife in Clark County on July 22, according to the NTSB.

Levon King, 81, and his wife, Gloria King, 85, died when their experimental aircraft crashed in a cornfield in Harmony Twp. The plane crashed seven miles east of Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport.

The couple were flying home to Michigan from Georgia, relatives said, when the RV-9A plane that Levon King built himself went down.

The NTSB continues to investigate the fatal crash involving Clayton Heins, 20, a student pilot from Arcanum, and his friend, Jacob Turner, 19, of Greenville, on Sept. 14, in Darke County. The plane was reportedly headed for the Moraine Air Park when it crashed in a cornfield.

Heins was flying a single-engine Piper PA-11 aircraft, owned by his father, when it crashed off Dull Road near Arcanum, according to reports.

On Sunday, investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the fatal crash scene in Warren County. The NTSB joined the investigation Monday.

INITIAL REPORT

Emergency crews were first dispatched around 5:45 p.m. Sunday after callers reported smoke and flames coming from a low-flying plane. The crash scene was located in a remote, wooded area near the Little Miami River, on property between Camp Kern and Moore-Saur Road, the Warren County Sheriff’s Office said.

Investigators said they had to use ATVs and boats to access the wreck. The plane was heavily burned and authorities were still working to identify its tail number.

It was not known where the plane was headed, nor from where it came.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the scene Sunday night, and members from the National Transportation Safety Board are expected to arrive Monday.

Doyle Burke, chief investigator with the Warren County Coroner’s Office, said they took two unidentified bodies to the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab. The victims are expected to be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.


Story and video:  http://www.whio.com





TURTLECREEK TWP.

UPDATE @ 10:20 p.m.

A two-seater prop plane was still burning when crews arrived this evening.

The plane crashed in a heavily wooded inaccessible area on state property near Camp Kern. Crews had to use ATVs and boats to access the wreck. The plane is heavily burned and authorities are still working to get its tail number. It’s undetermined where the plane was headed, nor from where it came. the FAA was on scene tonight, and the NTSB is expected on Monday.

A 911 caller reported hearing some noises and noticed a low-flying plane before the crash.

Late tonight, Doyle Burke, chief investigator with the Warren County Coroner’s Office, was taking two unidentified bodies to the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab. The victims are expected to be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.

UPDATE @ 9:30 p.m.

Officials from the FAA and NTSB were expected to arrive this evening to inspect the wreckage of a small plane crash near Camp Kern.

The crash site is in a heavily wooded area that is difficult to access. An Ohio State Highway Patrol helicopter, based in Columbus, was flying above, shining its light over the area.

UPDATE @ 7:55 p.m.

A Warren County Coroner’s investigator confirmed tonight that two people died in the crash of a small aircraft near Camp Kern.

Investigators at the scene were awaiting the arrival of members of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane’s tail number could not be seen because it was facing the ground. The mangled plane crashed in a heavily wooded area, investigators said.

The identities and genders of the crash victims are unknown.

UPDATE @ 6:50 p.m.

The Warren County Coroner’s Office confirms it was called tonight to the scene of the plane crash, which possibly involves multiple fatalities.

UPDATE @ 6:40 p.m.

The plane crash is under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

An updated location of the crash is on property off Gilmour Road, still near Camp Kern. No further information was available about how many people were aboard, the type of aircraft or whether there were any survivors.

FIRST REPORT

Emergency crews found the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in Turtlecreek Twp. this evening near Camp Kern.

The first calls came in around 5:45 p.m. to Warren County dispatch that a plane was flying low and that smoke and flames could be seen.

The crash was found near the Little Miami River on property between Camp Kern, 5291 Ohio 350, and Moore-Saur Road, according to the sheriff’s office.

Story and video:   http://www.journal-news.com

UPDATE:

The highway patrol says a 911 call came in about a low flying plane near the waterfront in Warren County.

The two seater prop plane went down somewhere around 6 oclock this evening, October 17, 2016 on the border of Turtlecreek Township and Salem Township.

Firefighters and other first responders hurried to the scene.

They had boats, ATVs and portable fire extinguishers.

First responders had to go about 3/4 of a mile to get to the plane which caught on fire once it crashed

"When I arrived on scene the plane was still on fire. Most if the fuel had already burned out of it, mostly a rubber fire. And we were able to put that out bit it was contained. We didn't have any fire brush or anything else catch fire, so pretty we'll contained," said Sargeant Robert Burd with the Highway Patrol Lebanon Post.

"Every incident is different. It' just a matter for the family's sake we need to make sure we get the victims positively identified and find out what happened," said Warren County Coroner.Doyle Burke.

The coroner said dental records will probably have to be used to help identify the victims.

It's not known if they were males or females.

The bodies were taken to the Montgomery County Coroner's Office.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will be coming to the crash site Monday to start it's investigation

UPDATE: Investigators confirm two people are dead after a small plane crash near Camp Kern.

They tell us the bodies will be taken to Dayton for identification.

Investigators say it was a fiery crash.

"When I arrived on scene the plane was still on fire. Most if the fuel had already burned out of it, mostly a rubber fire. And we were able to put that out bit it

was contained. We didn't have any fire brush or anything else catch fire, so pretty we'll contained," said Sgt. Robert Burd, Ohio Highway Patrol.

The bodies are burned beyond recognition, and the coroner will have to use dental records to ID the bodies.

UPDATE: Warren County Sheriff's Dispatch confirmed a small airplane has crashed in the southern part of the county.

The plane went down in Turtlecreek Township near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

The wreckage was reportedly found on a steep hill facing the river off of Route 350.

Dispatch also confirmed that the coroner has been called to the scene. It is unclear at this time how many were onboard the aircraft.

Ohio State Patrol is now investigating the accident.

UPDATE: Warren County Dispatch has confirmed the coroner has been called to the scene of the crash.

TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WKRC) - Warren County Sheriff's Dispatch confirmed a small airplane has crashed in southern Warren County.

Details are scarce at this point, but they did say the plane went down in Turtlecreek Township near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

Source:   http://abc22now.com

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