Friday, June 17, 2016

Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk, N2412D: Fatal accident occurred June 16, 2016 near Madison Municipal Airport (KIMS), Jefferson County, Indiana


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2412D

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA220 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 16, 2016 in Madison, IN
Aircraft: PIPER PA-38-112, registration: N2412D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 16, 2016, at 1106 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-38-112, N2412D, collided with power lines and terrain shortly after takeoff from Madison Municipal Airport (IMS), Madison, Indiana. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

An employee at the fixed base operator (FBO) reported that, before the airplane departed, she assisted the pilot with operating the self-serve fuel pump. She stated that she helped him swipe his credit card and remove the hose from the pump. She then went inside while he continued to fuel the airplane. She stated that she watched through the window as he took off and that the airplane appeared stable, but it was low as it passed by her field of vision. Shortly thereafter, FBO building momentarily lost power.

An individual who lived across from the accident site stated that he had just walked into his home and noted that the time was 1106. He then heard a loud impact and the lights flickered. He went outside to see what had happened and saw flames in the neighboring field. He ran toward the accident site to render assistance and the airplane's right wing was "sticking straight up," and the flames were about treetop height.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land that was issued in 1969. He also held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. The pilot was issued a third-class Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate on July 22, 2015, with the limitation "not valid for any class after July 31, 2016." On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight time of 216 hours, with 0 hours in the previous 6 months. Pilot logbooks were not located during the investigation.

The pilot flew with a flight instructor on November 14, 2015, for the purpose of receiving a flight review. The instructor reported that the pilot was "very rusty" and he had difficulty with "pitch control, airspeed control, flaring on landing & maintaining directional control." The pilot did not pass the flight review. The instructor reported that he told the pilot that he needed additional dual instruction to pass the flight review. The instructor flew with the pilot again on March 14, 2016, and again would not endorse the pilot for a flight review because he felt the pilot needed additional instruction. A few weeks later, the pilot approached the CFI and he was upset that the instructor would not sign off on his flight review. He told the instructor he was going to fly anyway. A few days later, the pilot saw the instructor again and admitted that the instructor was right.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The aircraft and engine logbooks were not located during the investigation. According to the mechanic who last worked on the airplane, the most recent annual inspection was performed on February 6, 2016. The airplane had a total time of 4,920.2 hours at that time. The engine had a total time since major overhaul of 962.9 hours.

The airplane was fueled with 12.27 gallons of 100LL fuel just before the accident flight. The total amount of fuel onboard at takeoff was unknown.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

AIRPORT INFORMATION

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located ½ mile south of the departure end of runway 21. The airplane came to rest in a field under two sets of power transmission lines that were about 55 ft apart. A transmission wire on the second set of lines was damaged, with only a few strands of wire holding it together. The support structures (towers) were about 80 ft tall; the wreckage was about 72 ft southwest of the closest tower. The top wooden structure on one of the H-tower supports was broken, and pieces of wood were scattered on the ground near the wreckage site.

The airplane was damaged by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The cockpit/cabin area was destroyed by the fire. The empennage sustained impact and thermal damage. The empennage was separated from the fuselage due to the fire, remaining attached only by the elevator and rudder control cables. The left elevator and horizontal stabilizer sustained impact damage, but were intact and remained attached to the empennage. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator remained attached to the empennage. The outboard end of both surfaces was destroyed by the fire and impact forces.

The inboard section of the left wing was partially consumed by the fire, with a small inboard section of the flap still attached to the wing. The fuel cap remained in place. The outboard 3 ft of the wing and aileron, including the wingtip and aileron counterweight, were present.

The right wing was separated at the wing root and was inverted and lying on top of the cockpit/engine. The right aileron remained attached to the wing. The inboard fuel tank section of the wing sustained impact and fire damage; the fuel tank was breached and the fuel cap was secured. A portion of the flap remained attached to the wing and the inboard section of the flap was destroyed by fire. The wingtip was located about 30 ft from the main wreckage. The wingtip exhibited scrape marks that matched the color of the wooden H-tower structures.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to the control surfaces.
The flap handle/rod assembly was separated from its mount. The pushrod assembly remained attached to the flap torque tube. The pin was in the middle detent position of the flap bracket, which correlated to 21° flap extension. This setting could not be verified by the position of the flaps.

The position of the fuel selector could not be determined due to thermal damage, which melted the inside of the fuel valve.

The engine was subjected to thermal damage but was intact with impact damage to the bottom exhaust stack.

The carburetor was secure on its mount. The inlet fuel line and carburetor airbox were destroyed by fire. The engine-driven fuel pump was secure on its mount; however, much of the pump was destroyed by fire. No fuel was present in either the carburetor or fuel pump.

The accessory section of the engine sustained impact and thermal damage. The magnetos were thermally damaged and could not be tested. The vacuum pump sustained fire damage and the coupling was melted.

All the rocker arms, valve springs, and connecting rods were in place. An attempt to rotate the engine by hand failed, so the accessory housing was removed. The engine was then free to rotate. Valve train continuity was established. Thumb suction and compression was verified on all cylinders.

The engine was equipped with Champion REM37BY spark plugs, which appeared to have normal wear signatures. The No. 2 cylinder bottom plug was oil-soaked.

The airplane was equipped with a Sensenich propeller, Model 72CK-0-56, serial number K8884. One of the propeller blades was straight with a ½-inch gouge in the leading edge located about 12 inches from the blade tip. The other blade was bent rearward about 50° starting at a point about 10 inches from the hub. The outboard 8 inches of the blade tip were bent forward. There was a gouge in the leading edge of the blade tip with a portion of the tip missing. The inside of the propeller hub sustained torsional impact damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was conducted at Kings Daughters Health, Madison, Indiana. The cause of death was attributed to multiple traumatic injuries sustained in the accident.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and tested-for drugs.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 16, 2016, at 1106 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-38-112, N2412D, collided with power lines and terrain shortly after takeoff from Madison Municipal Airport (IMS), Madison, Indiana. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

An employee at the fixed base operator (FBO) reported that, before the airplane departed, she assisted the pilot with operating the self-serve fuel pump. She stated that she helped him swipe his credit card and remove the hose from the pump. She then went inside while he continued to fuel the airplane. She stated that she watched through the window as he took off and that the airplane appeared stable, but it was low as it passed by her field of vision. Shortly thereafter, FBO building momentarily lost power.
An individual who lived across from the accident site stated that he had just walked into his home and noted that the time was 1106. He then heard a loud impact and the lights flickered. He went outside to see what had happened and saw flames in the neighboring field. He ran toward the accident site to render assistance and the airplane's right wing was "sticking straight up," and the flames were about treetop height.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land that was issued in 1969. He also held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. The pilot was issued a third-class Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate on July 22, 2015, with the limitation "not valid for any class after July 31, 2016." On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight time of 216 hours, with 0 hours in the previous 6 months. Pilot logbooks were not located during the investigation.

The pilot flew with a flight instructor on November 14, 2015, for the purpose of receiving a flight review. The instructor reported that the pilot was "very rusty" and he had difficulty with "pitch control, airspeed control, flaring on landing & maintaining directional control." The pilot did not pass the flight review. The instructor reported that he told the pilot that he needed additional dual instruction to pass the flight review. The instructor flew with the pilot again on March 14, 2016, and again would not endorse the pilot for a flight review because he felt the pilot needed additional instruction. A few weeks later, the pilot approached the CFI and he was upset that the instructor would not sign off on his flight review. He told the instructor he was going to fly anyway. A few days later, the pilot saw the instructor again and admitted that the instructor was right.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The aircraft and engine logbooks were not located during the investigation. According to the mechanic who last worked on the airplane, the most recent annual inspection was performed on February 6, 2016. The airplane had a total time of 4,920.2 hours at that time. The engine had a total time since major overhaul of 962.9 hours.

The airplane was fueled with 12.27 gallons of 100LL fuel just before the accident flight. The total amount of fuel onboard at takeoff was unknown.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

AIRPORT INFORMATION

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located ½ mile south of the departure end of runway 21. The airplane came to rest in a field under two sets of power transmission lines that were about 55 ft apart. A transmission wire on the second set of lines was damaged, with only a few strands of wire holding it together. The support structures (towers) were about 80 ft tall; the wreckage was about 72 ft southwest of the closest tower. The top wooden structure on one of the H-tower supports was broken, and pieces of wood were scattered on the ground near the wreckage site.

The airplane was damaged by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The cockpit/cabin area was destroyed by the fire. The empennage sustained impact and thermal damage. The empennage was separated from the fuselage due to the fire, remaining attached only by the elevator and rudder control cables. The left elevator and horizontal stabilizer sustained impact damage, but were intact and remained attached to the empennage. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator remained attached to the empennage. The outboard end of both surfaces was destroyed by the fire and impact forces.

The inboard section of the left wing was partially consumed by the fire, with a small inboard section of the flap still attached to the wing. The fuel cap remained in place. The outboard 3 ft of the wing and aileron, including the wingtip and aileron counterweight, were present.

The right wing was separated at the wing root and was inverted and lying on top of the cockpit/engine. The right aileron remained attached to the wing. The inboard fuel tank section of the wing sustained impact and fire damage; the fuel tank was breached and the fuel cap was secured. A portion of the flap remained attached to the wing and the inboard section of the flap was destroyed by fire. The wingtip was located about 30 ft from the main wreckage. The wingtip exhibited scrape marks that matched the color of the wooden H-tower structures.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to the control surfaces.
The flap handle/rod assembly was separated from its mount. The pushrod assembly remained attached to the flap torque tube. The pin was in the middle detent position of the flap bracket, which correlated to 21° flap extension. This setting could not be verified by the position of the flaps.

The position of the fuel selector could not be determined due to thermal damage, which melted the inside of the fuel valve.

The engine was subjected to thermal damage but was intact with impact damage to the bottom exhaust stack.

The carburetor was secure on its mount. The inlet fuel line and carburetor airbox were destroyed by fire. The engine-driven fuel pump was secure on its mount; however, much of the pump was destroyed by fire. No fuel was present in either the carburetor or fuel pump.

The accessory section of the engine sustained impact and thermal damage. The magnetos were thermally damaged and could not be tested. The vacuum pump sustained fire damage and the coupling was melted.

All the rocker arms, valve springs, and connecting rods were in place. An attempt to rotate the engine by hand failed, so the accessory housing was removed. The engine was then free to rotate. Valve train continuity was established. Thumb suction and compression was verified on all cylinders.

The engine was equipped with Champion REM37BY spark plugs, which appeared to have normal wear signatures. The No. 2 cylinder bottom plug was oil-soaked.

The airplane was equipped with a Sensenich propeller, Model 72CK-0-56, serial number K8884. One of the propeller blades was straight with a ½-inch gouge in the leading edge located about 12 inches from the blade tip. The other blade was bent rearward about 50° starting at a point about 10 inches from the hub. The outboard 8 inches of the blade tip were bent forward. There was a gouge in the leading edge of the blade tip with a portion of the tip missing. The inside of the propeller hub sustained torsional impact damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was conducted at Kings Daughters Health, Madison, Indiana. The cause of death was attributed to multiple traumatic injuries sustained in the accident.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and tested-for drugs.


BRIEF
The private pilot had departed the airport in visual meteorological conditions, when, about ½ mile from the departure end of the runway, the airplane collided with a power transmission line support structure that was about 80 ft tall. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire. There were no known witnesses to the accident, but a witness who saw the airplane take off stated that its altitude was low during the initial climb. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
In the months before the accident, the pilot flew with a flight instructor on two separate occasions for a flight review. The instructor stated that the pilot's skills were "very rusty" and that the pilot had difficulty controlling the airplane's airspeed, pitch, and landing flare. The instructor did not endorse the pilot for a flight review, and recommended that he receive additional dual instruction; however, it is unknown if the pilot followed this recommendation as his personal logbook was not located after the accident. Given the lack of preimpact mechanical anomalies, it is likely that the pilot did not maintain an appropriate rate of climb after takeoff, which resulted in collision with the powerline structure.

PC
The pilot's failure to maintain a proper climb rate after takeoff, which resulted in a collision with a power transmission line structure.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA220
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 16, 2016 in Madison, IN
Aircraft: PIPER PA 38-112, registration: N2412D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 16, 2016, at 1106 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-38-112, N2412D, collided with powerlines and the terrain following a loss of control shortly after takeoff from the Madison Municipal Airport (IMS), Madison, Indiana. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post impact fire. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident. 

The airplane came to rest in a field ½ mile south of the departure end of runway 21. The wreckage was located under two sets of Duke Energy transmission lines that were about 55 feet apart. The top wooden structure on one of the H-towers was broken and pieces of wood were scattered on the ground near the accident site. A transmission wire on the second set of lines was broken with only a few strands of wire holding the wire intact. The towers were about 80 feet tall. The wreckage was located about 72 feet from the closest tower.


Steven Douglas Kreuzburg
April 15, 1939 - June 16, 2016

Let Us Pause To Honor the Memory of Mr. Steven Douglas Kreuzburg 

Mr. Steven Douglas Kreuzburg, age 77, of Madison, Indiana grew up in Baltimore, MD, graduating from Milford Mills High School in Pikesville, MD. He attended Georgia Tech (aeronautical engineering); entered the USAF Aviation Cadet Reserves (‘60-61); graduated from PACE University. Steve provided systems design and development to early adopters of computer technology in the late ‘60s (Readers’ Digest, RCA, etc.) and continued in the technology world focused on the telecom industry. Later in his career, Steve shifted to aviation, working for airline legends Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines. In between, Steve drove limos and trucks, co-founded a computer/telephony company, sold synthetic oil, and was a census-taker and E911 Field Checker. He enjoyed many sports, especially tennis, skiing, rock-climbing, mountaineering and paddling, and was an avid aviation enthusiast holding Airframe & Powerplant Certificates and Private Pilot License. Steve enjoyed web site design and created a site to coincide with the Hanover College Duggan Library’s Captain Cook exhibit. He volunteered with the American Red Cross (including after Sept. 11 and hurricane Ivan), and was a volunteer water tester with the Muscatatuck Watershed project. Steven died on Thursday, June 16, 2016, at 1:30 p.m. in an airplane crash near Madison, Indiana. 

A LOVING FAMILY 
Steven will be missed by his loving wife, Kim Childs Kreuzburg of Madison, Indiana; his sons, Greg Kreuzburg and Todd Kreuzburg; his siblings, Sandy Rommel, Jimmy, Don, Ken and Janice Kreuzburg; his grandsons, Matt and Dave; his niece and grandniece, Jennifer and Haley Mettrick. He was preceded in death by his parents, Harvey and Betty Weigle Kreuzburg, and his brother, Wil Kreuzburg. 

MEMORIAL CEREMONY
Cremation was chosen and other arrangements are undecided at this time.

MEMORIAL EXPRESSIONS 
Memorial contributions may be made to the donor's Choice or the Madison Jefferson County Public Library. Cards are available at the funeral home.


Read more here:   http://www.morgan-nay.com

MADISON, Ind. (WHAS11) – The pilot who was killed in a plane crash in Madison has been identified.

Steven Douglas Kreuzburg, 76, was identified through dental records. He died of a traumatic spinal injury consistent with a plane crash.

The crash happened around 11:30 a.m. Thursday, leaving the small community mourning.

Jefferson County Indiana Sheriff John Wallace said, “Any loss of life is tragic and we worship all life and it is tough on the community, absolutely."

Indiana authorities said a small engine plane crashed less than a mile from the Madison Municipal Airport. They said it clipped high voltage power lines, and then hit the ground, bursting into flames.

It is not clear what caused the crash, but officials said getting those answers is a top priority.


NTSB and FAA officials are expected on scene Thursday night and Friday morning to continue the investigation.




MADISON, Ind. (WHAS11) -- Indiana authorities are investigating after a fiery plane crash that left one dead near Madison.

The crash happened around 11:30 a.m. Thursday, leaving the small community mourning.

Jefferson County Indiana Sheriff John Wallace said, “Any loss of life is tragic and we worship all life and it is tough on the community, absolutely."

Indiana authorities said a small engine plane crashed less than a mile from the Madison Municipal Airport. They said it clipped high voltage power lines, and then hit the ground, bursting into flames. The pilot, who has not yet been identified, was pronounced dead on the scene.

"It’s always tough when you speak with family members of someone who has died in a tragic accident or in any other way for that manner,” Wallace said.

WHAS11 was there when the sheriff delivered the difficult news to a woman who approached the scene, claiming the pilot was her husband.

The scene was deemed dangerous for hours as electrical teams worked to secure the power lines and neighbors left home with their pets as a safety precaution.

"We'll do a thorough investigation through the coroner's office and through the NTSB and hopefully get all the answers we can for them. That’s not much anytime someone loses their life, but it’s the best we can do,” Wallace said.

Officials said getting those answers is a top priority.

NTSB and FAA officials are expected on scene Thursday night and Friday morning to continue the investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.whas11.com





MADISON, IN (WAVE) - One man is dead after his small plane crashed and burned in Madison, Indiana.

Air 3 captured images of the plane, a Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk, on the ground and smoking just before noon on Thursday.

The small aircraft struck a wood beam and high-voltage power line after departure from the Madison Municipal Airport and crashed.

Jefferson County, Indiana Sheriff John Wallace said the crash happened at 11:20 a.m. The single engine plane burst into flames.

The name of the pilot has not been released. A woman came to the scene and told a sheriff's deputy that the pilot was her husband. 

Duke Energy crews were at the scene to assist authorities with the crash investigation. 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) are investigating the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.fox19.com






LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The Jefferson County Sheriff's Office in Indiana says one person has died after a small plane crashed near the Madison Municipal Airport.

According to Jefferson County Sheriff John Wallace, the crash took place just after 11 a.m., near Grange Hall Road and Chicken Run Road. Wallace said a single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft struck a wooden frame and then power lines near the airport, and that emergency responders had to wait for representatives of Duke Energy to arrive to secure the area before they could approach the plane.

"He had just taken off from the Madison Municipal Airport, which is just three quarters of a mile from the scene of the crash," Wallace said. "The plane was on fire when we arrived – and with the high-voltage power lines in play, we had to obviously play it safe for our first responders. Once we secure that area, we will be able to do an additional investigation to find out more."

Shortly after the plane crashed, a woman showed up at the scene, saying she believed the pilot who was killed was her husband, but his identity has not been released.

Late Thursday, the FAA and NTSB arrived on site to further investigate and determine what went wrong. 

The road is expected to be closed through Friday morning. 

Story and video:  http://www.wdrb.com

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