Sunday, May 29, 2016

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N29601: Accident occurred May 29, 2016 at Pine Bluff Regional Airport / Grider Field (KPBF), Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N29601 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA266 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 29, 2016 in Pine Bluff, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 177, registration: N29601
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, during a flour bomb competition at a local airport, she was making a bomb run parallel to runway 18 and slowed the airplane to 80 knots, with zero flaps, mixture was rich, throttle was about 75 percent, and carburetor heat was used. About 300 feet above the ground she dropped the bag of flour. She reported that after dropping the flour, she immediately advanced the throttle to full, ensured the mixture was full rich, zero flaps, and carburetor heat was placed in the cold position, but the engine hesitated when full throttle was applied. She reported that she lowered the nose in order to increase the airspeed and made a left turn to re-enter the pattern before establishing a positive rate of climb. She recalled that when she lowered the nose, the airspeed increased to about 100 knots indicated, she turned to the left, and the airplane did not climb. She recalled that the airplane continued to descend into a cornfield, bounced, and when the airplane settled back to the ground, the left main landing gear wheel became stuck in the mud and the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the empennage.

Per the Pilot’s Aircraft Accident Report in the (NTSB Form 6120.1 rev. 2013), the pilot reported that when full throttle was applied, the heading of 180 degrees should have been maintained until adequate airspeed was attained before turning crosswind. She asserted that, if the heading of 180 degrees was maintained when full power was not achieved, the plane could have landed on the runway.

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector that traveled to the accident site, interviewed witnesses and inspected the airplane. The Inspector reported that per the witness statements, the airplane was below the flour bomb designated minimum altitude of 200 feet above the ground and very slow. He reported that according to witnesses the aircraft stalled, lost altitude and landed in a corn field just off the airport property.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and her exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack during a low-altitude turn, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

According to the pilot, during a flour bomb competition at a local airport, she was making a bomb run parallel to runway 18 and slowed the airplane to 80 knots, with zero flaps, mixture was rich, throttle was about 75 percent, and carburetor heat was used. About 300 feet above the ground she dropped the bag of flour. She reported that after dropping the flour, she immediately advanced the throttle to full, ensured the mixture was full rich, zero flaps, and carburetor heat was placed in the cold position, but the engine hesitated when full throttle was applied. She reported that she lowered the nose in order to increase the airspeed and made a left turn to re-enter the pattern before establishing a positive rate of climb. She recalled that when she lowered the nose, the airspeed increased to about 100 knots indicated, she turned to the left, and the airplane did not climb. She recalled that the airplane continued to descend into a cornfield, bounced, and when the airplane settled back to the ground, the left main landing gear wheel became stuck in the mud and the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the empennage.

Per the Pilot's Aircraft Accident Report in the (NTSB Form 6120.1 rev. 2013), the pilot reported that when full throttle was applied, the heading of 180 degrees should have been maintained until adequate airspeed was attained before turning crosswind. She asserted that, if the heading of 180 degrees was maintained when full power was not achieved, the plane could have landed on the runway.

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector that traveled to the accident site, interviewed witnesses and inspected the airplane. The Inspector reported that per the witness statements, the airplane was below the flour bomb designated minimum altitude of 200 feet above the ground and very slow. He reported that according to witnesses the aircraft stalled, lost altitude and landed in a corn field just off the airport property.


A small plane containing a mother and daughter from Georgia crashed Sunday while participating in the Black Pilots of America fly-in at Pine Bluff Regional Airport.

Airport manager Doug Hale said the plane was not carrying children but was involved in one of the weekend’s activities held every year as part of Operation Skyhook.

“They’re OK,” Hale said Monday. “They got out and walked away. They went to the hospital to get checked out and were released and in fact they flew out this morning.”

Names of the two were not immediately available.

The crash occurred at about 10 a.m. east of the runway, Hale said.

“How and why it occurred I am not going to speculate, and the FAA has been called in to investigate,” he said.

This was the 20th anniversary of the Black Pilots event in Pine Bluff, and Hale said this was the first crash that has occurred.

“That’s a pretty good safety record,” Hale said. “Our fire department responded in a timely manner and got out to where the crash was, and in fact, it’s sitting in a corn field.”

Despite the weather, Hale said the weekend was a “good one” for the annual event.

“Of course Friday was a total washout but Saturday they were able to get in most of their flying events,” he said. “On Sunday, when the rain storm hit, we were able to get 30 airplanes that were participating in the event into hangars in 30 minutes and I was really proud of the staff out here.

“We got some of them into general aviation hangars and the rest into other hangars that the owners gave us permission to use,” he said. “We’ve received many complements from the pilots today who said they were impressed with what we were able to do.”

- See more at: http://pbcommercial.com

PINE BLUFF (KATV) — At least one person was injured in a small plane crash at the Pine Bluff Regional Airport Sunday morning.

The plane was part of a Memorial Day fly-in with the Black Pilots of America Organization.

Arkansas State Police officials say two people, a woman and child, were in the plane when the crash happened.

The child was taken to an area hospital. The condition of those involved have not been released.

The FAA has been called in to investigate.

Original article can be found here:  http://katv.com

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